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World-renowned and prominent speakers present on each week's theme at the Chautauqua Amphitheater in the Chautauqua Lecture Series. Other lecture series include:

The Interfaith Lecture Series at the Hall of Philosophy
The Chautauqua Literary and Scientific Circle (CLSC) Best Selling Author lecture series at the Hall of Philosophy
The Contemporary Issues Forum hosted by The Chautauqua Women's Club at the Hall of Philosophy
The African American Heritage House Lectures
The Heritage Lecture Series at the Hall of Christ and other locations
2020 Themes and ProgrammingAD
Review the themes and programming for the 2020 Summer Assembly Season at Chautauqua here www.chq.org/2020 or click on the "INFO" button below. It won't be Chautauqua without you.
Morning Lecture: Anna Deavere Smith; playwright, actor, pr..    Amphitheater
Founding director of the Institute on the Arts and Civic Dialogue, now housed at New York University, Anna Deavere Smith opens the week on “Art and Democracy” with her singular brand of theatre to explore issues of community, character, and diversity in America. Among Smith’s accolades is a “Genius” Fellowship from the MacArthur Foundation for creating “a new form of theatre — a blend of theatrical art, social commentary, journalism, and intimate reverie.” Best known for crafting more than 15 one-woman shows drawn from hundreds of interviews, Smith interweaves her presentations with portrayals of her interviewees to illustrate the diversity of emotions and points of view on controversial issues. Her most recent play, Notes from the Field — which won an Obie Award and the 2017 Nortel Award for Outstanding Solo Show — looks at the school-to-prison pipeline and injustice and inequality in low-income communities. Fires in the Mirror, a runner-up for the Pulitzer Prize, and the Tony-nominated Twilight: Los Angeles, tackle issues of race and social inequality. Her portrayals of patients and medical professionals in Let Me Down Easy delivered a vivid look at healthcare in the United States. Smith’s television work includes ABC’s “Black-ish” and “For the People,” Showtime’s “Nurse Jackie” and NBC’s “The West Wing.” Her films include “The American President,” “Rachel Getting Married,” and “Philadelphia.” At NYU, Smith is a professor at Tisch School of the Arts. Her books include Letters to a Young Artist and Talk to Me: Listening Between the Lines. In 2012, Smith was awarded the National Humanities Medal, and in 2015 was named the Jefferson Lecturer by the National Endowment for the Humanities. She is also the recipient of the Dorothy and Lillian Gish Prize, a Guggenheim Fellowship, and most recently, the 2017 Ridenhour Courage Prize and the George Polk Career Award for authentic journalism. She holds an M.F.A. in acting from the American Conservatory Theater.
Interfaith Lecture Series: Ori Soltes    Hall of Philosophy
Ori Z. Soltes teaches art history, theology, philosophy and political history at Georgetown University. He is former Director of the B’nai B’rith Klutznick National Jewish Museum, and has curated more than 85 exhibitions on history, ethnography and modern and contemporary art there and at other venues across the country and overseas. He is the author of over 280 books, articles, exhibition catalogues, and essays on a variety of topics. Recent books include Our Sacred Signs: How Jewish, Christian and Muslim Art Draw from the Same Source; Searching for Oneness: Mysticism in Judaism, Christianity and Islam; Untangling the Web of the Middle East; Magic and Religion in the Greco-Roman World: The Beginnings of Judaism and Christianity, and most recently, God and the Goalposts: A Brief History of Sports, Religion, Politics, War and Art. Professor Soltes leads study tours to different parts of the world, including, most recently, to Russia’s museums, monasteries, and sacred sites. This week will present a first-time interactive experience opportunity for the 2:00 audience as they access selected photos and art relevant to the lectures on their smart devices! As part of their City Makers: American Futures project in partnership with The Atlantic and Marketplace, the Fallowses visited smaller and medium-sized cities, meeting civic leaders, factory workers, recent immigrants, and young entrepreneurs to take the pulse and understand the prospects of places that usually draw notice only after a disaster or during a political campaign. The Fallowses’ book, Our Towns, is the story of their journey — and an account of a country busy remaking itself, despite the challenges and paralysis of national politics. London-based national correspondent James Fallows has written for The Atlantic since the late 1970s, living and reporting in Seattle, Berkeley, Austin, Tokyo, Kuala Lumpur, Shanghai, and Beijing. In addition to working for The Atlantic, he spent two years as chief White House speechwriter for Jimmy Carter and two years as the editor of US News & World Report. James Fallows has been a finalist for the National Magazine Award five times and has won once; he has also won the American Book Award for nonfiction and a N.Y. Emmy award for the documentary series “Doing Business in China.” He was the founding chairman of the New America Foundation. He is the author of numerous books, including Breaking the News: How the Media Undermines American Democracy and China Airborne; as well as Blind Into Baghdad and Postcards From Tomorrow Square, which are based on his writings for The Atlantic.
Morning Lecture: Darren Walker; president, Ford Foundation    Amphitheater
Darren Walker is president of the Ford Foundation, an international social justice philanthropy with a $13 billion endowment and $600 million in annual grant making. As part of a week on “Art and Democracy,” Walker will examine the way transformational philanthropy can strengthen the intersection of arts and social justice. Before joining Ford, Walker was vice president at the Rockefeller Foundation, and in the 1990s served as COO of the Abyssinian Development Corporation — Harlem’s largest community development organization. Earlier, he had a decade-long career in international law and finance at Cleary Gottlieb Steen & Hamilton and UBS. He chaired the philanthropy committee that brought a resolution to the city of Detroit’s historic bankruptcy and is co-founder and chair of the US Impact Investing Alliance. Walker co-chairs New York City’s Commission on City Art, Monuments, and Markers, and serves on the Commission on the Future of Rikers Island Correctional Institution and the UN International Labor Organization Commission on the Future of Work. He also serves on the boards of Carnegie Hall, the Smithsonian’s National Museum of African American History and Culture, the National Gallery of Art, Art Bridges and the High Line, among other organizations, and has been recognized by numerous annual media lists, including Time’s 100 Most Influential People in the World, Rolling Stone’s 25 People Shaping the Future, and Out magazine’s Power 50. Walker holds a Bachelor of Arts in government and a Bachelor of Science in speech communication from the University of Texas at Austin, and a J.D. from the University of Texas School of Law.
Interfaith Lecture Series: David Moss    Hall of Philosophy
David Moss views himself as an illuminator, animator, and transformer of Jewish texts, objects, spaces, and souls. He began his career in Jewish art when he fell in love with Hebrew calligraphy. He is responsible for the revival of the hand-decorated Jewish Marriage Contract— Ketubah—spent three years on a commission to create an illuminated Haggadah—the Passover book celebrating the Exodus—and is a partner in the Tree of Life Shtender—an intricate study/prayer stand containing virtually all the Jewish ritual objects. Whether creating books, prints, objects, educational programs, or designing communal buildings, each of his projects draws deeply on Jewish text and tradition, and contains the spark of creativity and is executed with meticulous craftsmanship. David lives in Jerusalem and is a co-founder of Kol HaOt which harnesses the power of the arts for Jewish inspiration and education. He is the coordinator of the Teacher Institute for the Art, a fully funded year-long program to bring his educational vision into Jewish schools in North America. He currently is producing an ongoing series of limited-editions works for a group of private and institutional subscribers. David’s Works are exhibited at or in the permanent collections of: the British Museum, Duke University Library, Harvard’s Widener Library, Hebrew Union College Library, Getty Museum, Israel Museum, Jewish Theological Seminary Library, Library of Congress, Magnes Museum, National Library of Canada, New York Public Library, Princeton University Library, Skirball Museum, Stanford University Library, Tel Aviv Museum, Yale’s Beinecke Rare Book and Manuscript Library, and Yeshivah University Museum. As part of their City Makers: American Futures project in partnership with The Atlantic and Marketplace, the Fallowses visited smaller and medium-sized cities, meeting civic leaders, factory workers, recent immigrants, and young entrepreneurs to take the pulse and understand the prospects of places that usually draw notice only after a disaster or during a political campaign. The Fallowses’ book, Our Towns, is the story of their journey — and an account of a country busy remaking itself, despite the challenges and paralysis of national politics. London-based national correspondent James Fallows has written for The Atlantic since the late 1970s, living and reporting in Seattle, Berkeley, Austin, Tokyo, Kuala Lumpur, Shanghai, and Beijing. In addition to working for The Atlantic, he spent two years as chief White House speechwriter for Jimmy Carter and two years as the editor of US News & World Report. James Fallows has been a finalist for the National Magazine Award five times and has won once; he has also won the American Book Award for nonfiction and a N.Y. Emmy award for the documentary series “Doing Business in China.” He was the founding chairman of the New America Foundation. He is the author of numerous books, including Breaking the News: How the Media Undermines American Democracy and China Airborne; as well as Blind Into Baghdad and Postcards From Tomorrow Square, which are based on his writings for The Atlantic.
Interfaith Lecture Series: Eugene Friesen    Hall of Philosophy
Four-time Grammy Award-winner Eugene Friesen is active internationally as a concert and recording artist, composer, conductor and teacher. Eugene has worked and recorded with such diverse artists as Dave Brubeck, Martin Sexton, Toots Thielemans, Betty Buckley, Dar Williams, Will Ackerman, and Dream Theater. Eugene's passion for improvised music has been featured in concerts all over the world with the Paul Winter Consort and with Trio Globo (Friesen, Howard Levy and Glen Velez). He appeared on Garrison Keillor's "A Prairie Home Companion" playing with Keillor and soprano Renée Fleming and has performed as a soloist at the International Cello Festival in Manchester, England; Rencontres d'Ensembles de Violoncelles in Beauvais, France; the World Cello Congress in Baltimore, Maryland; and the Rio International Cello Encounter in Rio de Janeiro. A love for children and music education led Eugene to create his popular program for young audiences, CelloMan, and has fueled his work teaching new cello techniques and improvisation in the United States, Asia, Europe, Egypt, and South America. His book, “Improvisation for Classical Musicians” was published in 2012 by Berklee Press/Hal Leonard. Recording credits include eight albums of original music, more than 30 CDs with the Paul Winter Consort, and hundreds of tracks featuring his rapturous cello playing on instrumental albums, films, and television scores. Eugene is an artist-in-residence at the Cathedral of St. John the Divine in New York City, and on the faculty of the Berklee College of Music in Boston. He creates “healing prayer-in-concert from a cellist” – and, yes, he will also speak through his cello here at Chautauqua. As part of their City Makers: American Futures project in partnership with The Atlantic and Marketplace, the Fallowses visited smaller and medium-sized cities, meeting civic leaders, factory workers, recent immigrants, and young entrepreneurs to take the pulse and understand the prospects of places that usually draw notice only after a disaster or during a political campaign. The Fallowses’ book, Our Towns, is the story of their journey — and an account of a country busy remaking itself, despite the challenges and paralysis of national politics. London-based national correspondent James Fallows has written for The Atlantic since the late 1970s, living and reporting in Seattle, Berkeley, Austin, Tokyo, Kuala Lumpur, Shanghai, and Beijing. In addition to working for The Atlantic, he spent two years as chief White House speechwriter for Jimmy Carter and two years as the editor of US News & World Report. James Fallows has been a finalist for the National Magazine Award five times and has won once; he has also won the American Book Award for nonfiction and a N.Y. Emmy award for the documentary series “Doing Business in China.” He was the founding chairman of the New America Foundation. He is the author of numerous books, including Breaking the News: How the Media Undermines American Democracy and China Airborne; as well as Blind Into Baghdad and Postcards From Tomorrow Square, which are based on his writings for The Atlantic.
Morning Lecture: Paula A. Kerger; president and CEO, PBS    Amphitheater
Paula A. Kerger is president and chief executive officer of PBS, the nation’s largest non-commercial media organization, with more than 330-member stations throughout the country. Having joined PBS in March 2006, Kerger is the longest-serving president and CEO in the organization's history. She joins the Chautauqua Lecture Series during a week exploring “Art and Democracy” with a discussion of “PBS American Portrait,” a national storytelling project aimed to highlight who we are as Americans. Under Kerger’s leadership, PBS has grown its audiences across genres and platforms. PBS has moved from the 14th most-watched network in America to number seven in the past decade. Since Kerger’s arrival, PBS has consistently presented high-quality, groundbreaking content that delivers on the founding mission of public television — to educate, inspire and entertain the American people. In the past year, PBS and its producing partners have been recognized with several prestigious honors, including seven Peabody Awards, six Alfred I. DuPont-Columbia University Awards and nine News & Documentary Emmy Awards. Kerger led the historic launch of the PBS KIDS 24/7 broadcast and streaming channel and oversaw the development of PBS Learning Media, which empowers teachers across America to engage and inspire their students with high-quality digital content. She also serves as president of the PBS Foundation, an independent organization that raises private sector funding — a significant source of revenue for new projects at PBS. Among her numerous awards and honors, in 2017 Kerger received the Advancing American Democracy Award from the Benjamin Harrison Presidential Site. Prior to joining PBS, Kerger served for more than a decade at Educational Broadcasting Corporation (EBC), the parent company of Thirteen/WNET and WLIW21 New York, where her ultimate position was executive vice president and chief operating officer. Kerger received her bachelor’s degree from the University of Baltimore, where she serves on the Merrick School of Business Dean’s Advisory Council.
Interfaith Lecture Series: Azzah Sultan    Hall of Philosophy
Azzah Sultan is a celebrated artist, having received her BFA from Parsons School of Design, and who is working to receive an MFA shortly from Washington State University. Born in Abu Dhabi, and a Malaysian native who grew up in Malaysia, Saudi, Finland, and Bahrain, she has spent six years living in America working on her artistic practice. Her art has been exhibited in The New School, Parsons Paris Gallery, S.A.D. Gallery, The Bushwick Collective, BUFU Studios, The Ely Center, Sotheby’s Institute of Art, Blackfish Gallery, Chase Gallery, Terrain 12, KMAC Gallery, and Egoless Gallery, and she was also a panelist for “Muslim Women Reclaim Their Identities” at Amherst College in Massachusetts. While living in New York, Azzah served as a program coordinator at Triangle Arts Association and as an artist assistant for Artist of Color Block. Before starting her Masters she worked at the Islamic Art Museum as a graphic designer. Her work strives to transcend the fallacy that Muslim women like herself are oppressed by the nature of their religious customs. Her work also speaks to the issues of finding her identity through culture and immigration. Here is her Artist Statement: I use my experiences of being a brown Muslim woman and highlight stereotypes ingrained within my community through installation strategies; my body of work debunks cultural myths created by society and explores stigmas related to my identity. I aim to give authority to myself in my work by being the performer, the author, and the subject, and I play on this idea of the self by also exploring my relationship with my parents, language, and my Malaysian nationality. Being an immigrant in a country can shape and form the way you live your life. You struggle to identify yourself whether you are a part of your environment or still considered an outsider. The traditions and cultural practices that come from the homeland may not be the norm to follow where one has chosen to live. Traditional garments, and passing down of familial lineage and practices, are what I am currently interested in exploring in my artistic practice. As part of their City Makers: American Futures project in partnership with The Atlantic and Marketplace, the Fallowses visited smaller and medium-sized cities, meeting civic leaders, factory workers, recent immigrants, and young entrepreneurs to take the pulse and understand the prospects of places that usually draw notice only after a disaster or during a political campaign. The Fallowses’ book, Our Towns, is the story of their journey — and an account of a country busy remaking itself, despite the challenges and paralysis of national politics. London-based national correspondent James Fallows has written for The Atlantic since the late 1970s, living and reporting in Seattle, Berkeley, Austin, Tokyo, Kuala Lumpur, Shanghai, and Beijing. In addition to working for The Atlantic, he spent two years as chief White House speechwriter for Jimmy Carter and two years as the editor of US News & World Report. James Fallows has been a finalist for the National Magazine Award five times and has won once; he has also won the American Book Award for nonfiction and a N.Y. Emmy award for the documentary series “Doing Business in China.” He was the founding chairman of the New America Foundation. He is the author of numerous books, including Breaking the News: How the Media Undermines American Democracy and China Airborne; as well as Blind Into Baghdad and Postcards From Tomorrow Square, which are based on his writings for The Atlantic.
CLSC Author Presentation: John Hoppenthaler, presents Toni..    Hall of Philosophy
John Hoppenthaler, presents Toni Morrison's Here is Toni Morrison in her own words: a rich gathering of her most important essays and speeches, spanning four decades. These pages give us her searing prayer for the dead of 9/11, her Nobel lecture on the power of language, her searching meditation on Martin Luther King Jr., her heart-wrenching eulogy for James Baldwin. She looks deeply into the fault lines of culture and freedom: the foreigner, female empowerment, the press, money, “black matter(s),” human rights, the artist in society, the Afro-American presence in American literature. And she turns her incisive critical eye to her own work (The Bluest Eye, Sula, Tar Baby, Jazz, Beloved, Paradise) and that of others. An essential collection from an essential writer, The Source of Self-Regard shines with the literary elegance, intellectual prowess, spiritual depth, and moral compass that have made Toni Morrison our most cherished and enduring voice. For nine years, he served as Personal Assistant to Toni Morrison. John Hoppenthaler is the author of the poetry collections Lives of Water, Anticipate the Coming Reservoir, and Domestic Garden. With Kazim Ali, he has co-edited a volume of essays and interviews on the poetry of Jean Valentine, This-World Company. He received his MFA in Poetry Writing from Virginia Commonwealth University. He is on the advisory board for Backbone Press, a press dedicated to marginalized voices. He is a Professor of Creative Writing and Literature at East Carolina University.
Morning Lecture: Samantha Power; former U.N. Ambassador    Amphitheater
Former U.S. Ambassador to the United Nations Samantha Power brings her experience of years of public service to the Amphitheater stage with an examination of the role arts and humanities can play in diplomacy and as a representation of a healthy, enriched democracy to the world. Power spent half of her career explaining complex geopolitical events and eight years at the UN helping to shape them. As the 28th U.S. Ambassador to the U.N., Power became the public face of U.S. opposition to Russian aggression in Ukraine and Syria, negotiated the toughest sanctions in a generation against North Korea, lobbied to secure the release of political prisoners, and helped mobilize global action against ISIL. From 2009 to 2013, she served on the National Security Council as Special Assistant to the President and Senior Director for Multilateral Affairs and Human Rights. Before joining the U.S. government, Power was the founding executive director of the Carr Center for Human Rights Policy at the Harvard Kennedy School, a columnist for Time, and a National Magazine Award-winning contributor to the Atlantic, the New Yorker, and the New York Review of Books. Beginning her career as a journalist, Power reported from places such as Bosnia, East Timor, Kosovo, Rwanda, Sudan and Zimbabwe. Winner of the 2016 Henry A. Kissinger Prize from the American Academy in Berlin, Power is the author of, most recently, The Education of an Idealist. Her book, A Problem from Hell: America and the Age of Genocide, won the Pulitzer Prize and the National Book Critics Circle Award in 2003. The Anna Lindh Professor of Practice at Harvard Kennedy School and Harvard Law School, Power earned a B.A. from Yale University and a J.D. from Harvard Law School.
Interfaith Lecture Series: Eryl and Wayman Kubicka    Hall of Philosophy
Wayman Kubicka graduated from Beloit College in Wisconsin in 1965 with a degree in philosophy. Through the study of philosophy he became deeply interested in Zen Buddhism and meditation. In 1967 Wayman joined an American Friends Service Committee (Quaker) team in Vietnam, helping to build and run a rehabilitation center for injured civilians in the war-torn province of Quang Ngai. On leaving Vietnam he suffered a serious period of PTSD that was gradually alleviated by practicing meditation under the guidance of Roshi Philip Kapleau, founder of the Rochester Zen Center. In 2001 Wayman moved to Batavia, New York, to help build and run the Rochester Zen Center’s country retreat center, where he currently is in charge of training and teaches meditation. He was ordained as a Buddhist priest in 2010. Eryl Kubicka was born in England in 1941 during the Second World War. The experience of growing up in the precarious and unpredictable environment of a country at war influenced a later search that led to the practice of Zen meditation. Eryl graduated as a physical therapist in1963, and in1969 joined the AFSC (Quaker) project as a physical therapist and practicing Buddhist in Quang Ngai, where she met Wayman. They were married in 1970, and spent eight more years involved with the AFSC in post-war reconstruction projects. They have practiced Zen meditation for four decades under the guidance, first of Roshi Philip Kapleau, and later under the current abbot, Roshi Bodhin Kjolhede. Eryl currently teaches meditation and coordinates the youth program at the Rochester Zen Center. Both Eryl and Wayman have been teachers of Buddhist meditation in Chautauqua’s Mystic Heart Program for ten years. As part of their City Makers: American Futures project in partnership with The Atlantic and Marketplace, the Fallowses visited smaller and medium-sized cities, meeting civic leaders, factory workers, recent immigrants, and young entrepreneurs to take the pulse and understand the prospects of places that usually draw notice only after a disaster or during a political campaign. The Fallowses’ book, Our Towns, is the story of their journey — and an account of a country busy remaking itself, despite the challenges and paralysis of national politics. London-based national correspondent James Fallows has written for The Atlantic since the late 1970s, living and reporting in Seattle, Berkeley, Austin, Tokyo, Kuala Lumpur, Shanghai, and Beijing. In addition to working for The Atlantic, he spent two years as chief White House speechwriter for Jimmy Carter and two years as the editor of US News & World Report. James Fallows has been a finalist for the National Magazine Award five times and has won once; he has also won the American Book Award for nonfiction and a N.Y. Emmy award for the documentary series “Doing Business in China.” He was the founding chairman of the New America Foundation. He is the author of numerous books, including Breaking the News: How the Media Undermines American Democracy and China Airborne; as well as Blind Into Baghdad and Postcards From Tomorrow Square, which are based on his writings for The Atlantic.
Morning Lecture: Nicholas Thompson; editor-in-chief,    Amphitheater
The story of how science and tech will change our lives is one of the most important in the world. Nicholas Thompson, the editor-in-chief of Wired, is the first person to know — and investigate — both the technological and ethical developments as they unfold in Silicon Valley. Championing tech’s role in making the world a better place, at Wired, Thompson is staking out a bold, optimistic vision for covering, and responding to, the changing realm of digital culture: from artificial intelligence to entertainment, privacy to social media, ethics to war — topics he’ll discuss to open the week. Thompson served previously as a senior editor at Wired from 2005 to 2010, then played a pivotal role with The New Yorker — first as senior editor, then as editor of the magazine’s digital platform, where he helped re-design the website, launch the New Yorker app, spark an eight-fold increase in monthly readers, and quadruple the number of new digital subscribers each month. Earlier in his career, Thompson worked as a senior editor at Legal Affairs, as an editor at the Washington Monthly, and co-founded The Atavist, a National Magazine Award-winning publishing company. He is also the author of The Hawk and the Dove: Paul Nitze, George Kennan, and the History of the Cold War. Thompson is the recipient of the 21st Century Leader Award from The National Committee on American Foreign Policy and was a Future Tense Fellow at the New America Foundation. He graduated from Stanford University, where he was a United States Truman Scholar.
Interfaith Lecture Series: Dr. Gerard Magill    Hall of Philosophy
Since 2007 Dr. Gerard Magill has held the Vernon F. Gallagher Chair for the Integration of Science, Theology, Philosophy, and Law at Duquesne University in Pittsburgh, where he is a tenured Professor in the Center for Healthcare Ethics. Dr. Magill is also a board member for the Carl G. Grefenstette Center for Ethics in Science, Technology, and Law at Duquesne University, and is actively involved in its mission. Dr. Magill graduated with his Ph.D. degree In 1987 from Edinburgh University in Scotland, and then developed his scholarly career at Saint Louis University, where in 1996 he was appointed as the Department Chair of the Center for Healthcare Ethics in the University’s Health Sciences Campus. As Executive Director of that Center from 1999 he held multiple appointments, including being a member of the Council of Deans for the University’s Health Sciences Campus, a Division Director in the Department of Internal Medicine at the University Hospital, a member of the University’s Institutional Review Board, a member of the Hospital Ethics Committee, a Professor in the School of Medicine (secondary appointment), and a Professor in the School of Public Health (secondary appointment). Dr. Magill has authored, co-authored, or edited 12 books, including a co-authored textbook on healthcare ethics. His most recent co-authored book (2020) deals with governance ethics for healthcare organizations. He has published over 70 scholarly articles and has given over 200 presentations at academic and professional conferences. A member of 15 Professional Associations, he has extensive experience on Institutional Review Boards, Ethics Consultation Services, and Hospital Ethics Committees. In the Center for Healthcare Ethics at Duquesne University, Dr. Magill teaches courses on ethics in the doctoral program. His current research includes: Governance Ethics and Organizational Ethics in Healthcare; Vascularized Composite Allotransplantation (e.g., Face & Limb transplants); Hospital Ethics Committees; Research Ethics, Human Subjects Protection, and Institutional Review Boards; Medical Error and Patient Safety; and Human Genomics & Digital/Bio-Technology. As part of their City Makers: American Futures project in partnership with The Atlantic and Marketplace, the Fallowses visited smaller and medium-sized cities, meeting civic leaders, factory workers, recent immigrants, and young entrepreneurs to take the pulse and understand the prospects of places that usually draw notice only after a disaster or during a political campaign. The Fallowses’ book, Our Towns, is the story of their journey — and an account of a country busy remaking itself, despite the challenges and paralysis of national politics. London-based national correspondent James Fallows has written for The Atlantic since the late 1970s, living and reporting in Seattle, Berkeley, Austin, Tokyo, Kuala Lumpur, Shanghai, and Beijing. In addition to working for The Atlantic, he spent two years as chief White House speechwriter for Jimmy Carter and two years as the editor of US News & World Report. James Fallows has been a finalist for the National Magazine Award five times and has won once; he has also won the American Book Award for nonfiction and a N.Y. Emmy award for the documentary series “Doing Business in China.” He was the founding chairman of the New America Foundation. He is the author of numerous books, including Breaking the News: How the Media Undermines American Democracy and China Airborne; as well as Blind Into Baghdad and Postcards From Tomorrow Square, which are based on his writings for The Atlantic.
Interfaith Lecture Series: Jason Thacker    Hall of Philosophy
Jason Thacker serves as Associate Research Fellow and Creative Director at The Ethics and Religious Liberty Commission of the Southern Baptist Convention. He writes and speaks on topics that include human dignity, ethics, technology and artificial intelligence, and his work has been featured in Christianity Today, The Gospel Coalition, Slate, Politico and many more. He is the author of The Age of AI: Artificial Intelligence and the Future of Humanity (Zondervan, March 2020). Jason holds a Master of Divinity from The Southern Baptist Theological Seminary, where he is currently pursuing a PhD in Ethics and Public Theology. Married to Dorie, they are blessed with two sons. As part of their City Makers: American Futures project in partnership with The Atlantic and Marketplace, the Fallowses visited smaller and medium-sized cities, meeting civic leaders, factory workers, recent immigrants, and young entrepreneurs to take the pulse and understand the prospects of places that usually draw notice only after a disaster or during a political campaign. The Fallowses’ book, Our Towns, is the story of their journey — and an account of a country busy remaking itself, despite the challenges and paralysis of national politics. London-based national correspondent James Fallows has written for The Atlantic since the late 1970s, living and reporting in Seattle, Berkeley, Austin, Tokyo, Kuala Lumpur, Shanghai, and Beijing. In addition to working for The Atlantic, he spent two years as chief White House speechwriter for Jimmy Carter and two years as the editor of US News & World Report. James Fallows has been a finalist for the National Magazine Award five times and has won once; he has also won the American Book Award for nonfiction and a N.Y. Emmy award for the documentary series “Doing Business in China.” He was the founding chairman of the New America Foundation. He is the author of numerous books, including Breaking the News: How the Media Undermines American Democracy and China Airborne; as well as Blind Into Baghdad and Postcards From Tomorrow Square, which are based on his writings for The Atlantic.
Interfaith Lecture Series    Hall of Philosophy
As part of their City Makers: American Futures project in partnership with The Atlantic and Marketplace, the Fallowses visited smaller and medium-sized cities, meeting civic leaders, factory workers, recent immigrants, and young entrepreneurs to take the pulse and understand the prospects of places that usually draw notice only after a disaster or during a political campaign. The Fallowses’ book, Our Towns, is the story of their journey — and an account of a country busy remaking itself, despite the challenges and paralysis of national politics. London-based national correspondent James Fallows has written for The Atlantic since the late 1970s, living and reporting in Seattle, Berkeley, Austin, Tokyo, Kuala Lumpur, Shanghai, and Beijing. In addition to working for The Atlantic, he spent two years as chief White House speechwriter for Jimmy Carter and two years as the editor of US News & World Report. James Fallows has been a finalist for the National Magazine Award five times and has won once; he has also won the American Book Award for nonfiction and a N.Y. Emmy award for the documentary series “Doing Business in China.” He was the founding chairman of the New America Foundation. He is the author of numerous books, including Breaking the News: How the Media Undermines American Democracy and China Airborne; as well as Blind Into Baghdad and Postcards From Tomorrow Square, which are based on his writings for The Atlantic.
Morning Lecture: Deborah G. Johnson; Anne Shirley Carter O..    Amphitheater
Deborah G. Johnson recently retired as the Anne Shirley Carter Olsson Professor of Applied Ethics in the University of Virginia’s Department of Engineering and Society; she holds that title with emeritus status, continuing her research which largely focuses on ethics and information technology. She takes the Amphitheater stage to discuss new technologies that challenge both cybersecurity and the integrity of elections, and how we as citizens can ethically and responsibly navigate a digital world of disinformation, deepfakes, and general foreign interference. Throughout her career, Johnson has taught engineering students at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, Georgia Institute of Technology, and the University of Virginia. She is best known for her work on computer ethics and engineering ethics, and published one of the first textbooks on computer ethics in 1985. Drawing on her training in philosophy and ethics, she has published on a wide range of topics all directly or indirectly having to do with ethical, social, and policy implications of technology, especially information technology. Her research has repeatedly received support from the National Science Foundation. Among several honors, Johnson was awarded the Covey Award from the International Association for Computing and Philosophy in 2018, and the Joseph Weizenbaum Award for life-long contributions to information and computer ethics from the International Society for Ethics and Information Technology in 2015. Johnson has served as President of the Society for Philosophy and Technology, President of the International Society for Ethics and Information Technology (INSEIT), Treasurer of the ACM Special Interest Group on Computers and Society, Chair of the American Philosophical Association Committee on Computers and Philosophy, and a member of the Executive Board of the Association for Practical and Professional Ethics. She earned her Ph.D. in Philosophy from the University of Kansas.
Interfaith Lecture Series: Noreen Herzfeld    Hall of Philosophy
Noreen Herzfeld is the Nicholas and Bernice Reuter Professor of Science and Religion at St. John’s University and the College of St. Benedict, and a research associate with ZRS Koper. In this week Professor Herzfeld, who is also a public intellectual, will bring a significant breadth of wisdom and perspective to the conversation of ethics and the evolving realities and implications of the Technological Age. Professor Herzfeld holds degrees in Computer Science and Mathematics from The Pennsylvania State University and a Ph.D. in Theology from The Graduate Theological Union at Berkeley. She is the author of In Our Image: Artificial Intelligence and the Human Spirit (Fortress, 2002), Technology and Religion: Remaining Human in a Co-Created World (Templeton, 2009), The Limits of Perfection in Technology, Religion, and Science (Pandora, 2010) and editor of Religion and the New Technologies (MDPI, 2017). Dr. Herzfeld has published numerous articles and book chapters, and is a frequent speaker on the prospects for AI, ethical issues in technology, and Islam. She is the founder and a writer for the Avon Hills Salon (avonhillssalon.com), a group of scholars who strive to connect their scholarship to the myriad of issues and contemporary problems that shape everyday life in the United States and abroad. As part of their City Makers: American Futures project in partnership with The Atlantic and Marketplace, the Fallowses visited smaller and medium-sized cities, meeting civic leaders, factory workers, recent immigrants, and young entrepreneurs to take the pulse and understand the prospects of places that usually draw notice only after a disaster or during a political campaign. The Fallowses’ book, Our Towns, is the story of their journey — and an account of a country busy remaking itself, despite the challenges and paralysis of national politics. London-based national correspondent James Fallows has written for The Atlantic since the late 1970s, living and reporting in Seattle, Berkeley, Austin, Tokyo, Kuala Lumpur, Shanghai, and Beijing. In addition to working for The Atlantic, he spent two years as chief White House speechwriter for Jimmy Carter and two years as the editor of US News & World Report. James Fallows has been a finalist for the National Magazine Award five times and has won once; he has also won the American Book Award for nonfiction and a N.Y. Emmy award for the documentary series “Doing Business in China.” He was the founding chairman of the New America Foundation. He is the author of numerous books, including Breaking the News: How the Media Undermines American Democracy and China Airborne; as well as Blind Into Baghdad and Postcards From Tomorrow Square, which are based on his writings for The Atlantic.
Morning Lecture: Michael Sandel; Anne T. and Robert M. Bas..    Amphitheater
Harvard political philosopher and bestselling author Michael Sandel returns to the Chautauqua Amphitheater to close Week Six’s exploration of “The Ethics of Tech” with a Socratic discussion on what audiences have learned throughout the week, drawing on his Harvard course “Tech Ethics: AI, Biotech, and the Future of Human Nature.” That course, co-taught with Douglas Melton, explores the moral, social, and political implications of new technologies and asks how science and technology are transforming the way we work, learn, make friends, raise children, care for our health, conduct our politics, and understand what it means to be human. One of Foreign Policy’s Top 100 Global Thinkers, Sandel has been described as “the most relevant living philosopher,” “a rock-star moralist”, and “the most famous teacher of philosophy in the world.” His writings — on justice, democracy, morals, and markets — have been translated into 27 languages. Sandel’s legendary course "Justice" has enrolled over 15,000 students and was the first Harvard course to be made freely available online and on public television. Sandel is the author of numerous books, three of which — Justice: What’s the Right Thing to Do?, What Money Can't Buy: The Moral Limits of Markets, and The Case Against Perfection: Ethics in the Age of Genetic Engineering — have been Chautauqua Literary and Scientific Circle selections throughout the years. For his strong work “on the normative foundations of liberal democracy as well as the defense of civic virtues,” Sandel won the Princess of Asturias Award in Social Sciences from Spain, in 2018. Sandel graduated Phi Beta Kappa from Brandeis University with a bachelor's degree in politics, and received his doctorate from Balliol College, Oxford, as a Rhodes Scholar.
Interfaith Lecture Series: Lisa Sharon Harper    Hall of Philosophy
Lisa Sharon Harper is the founder and president of Freedom Road, a groundbreaking consulting group that crafts experiences that bring common understanding and common commitments that lead to common action toward a more just world. Lisa is a public theologian whose writing, speaking, activism, and training has sparked and fed the fires of re-formation in the church from Ferguson and Charlottesville to South Africa, Brazil, Australia and Ireland. A columnist at Sojourners Magazine and an Auburn Theological Seminary Senior Fellow, Ms. Harper has appeared onTVOne, FoxNews Online, NPR, and Al Jazeera America. Her writing has been featured in CNN Belief Blog, The National Civic Review, Sojourners, The Huffington Post, Relevant Magazine, and Essence Magazine. She writes extensively on shalom and governance, immigration reform, health care reform, poverty, racial and gender justice, climate change, and transformational civic engagement. Ms. Harper earned her Master’s degree in Human Rights from Columbia University in New York City, and served as Sojourners Chief Church Engagement Officer. Her book, The Very Good Gospel, was named 2016 “Book of the Year,” and the Huffington Post identified her as one of 50 Women Religious Leaders to Celebrate on International Women’s Day. As part of their City Makers: American Futures project in partnership with The Atlantic and Marketplace, the Fallowses visited smaller and medium-sized cities, meeting civic leaders, factory workers, recent immigrants, and young entrepreneurs to take the pulse and understand the prospects of places that usually draw notice only after a disaster or during a political campaign. The Fallowses’ book, Our Towns, is the story of their journey — and an account of a country busy remaking itself, despite the challenges and paralysis of national politics. London-based national correspondent James Fallows has written for The Atlantic since the late 1970s, living and reporting in Seattle, Berkeley, Austin, Tokyo, Kuala Lumpur, Shanghai, and Beijing. In addition to working for The Atlantic, he spent two years as chief White House speechwriter for Jimmy Carter and two years as the editor of US News & World Report. James Fallows has been a finalist for the National Magazine Award five times and has won once; he has also won the American Book Award for nonfiction and a N.Y. Emmy award for the documentary series “Doing Business in China.” He was the founding chairman of the New America Foundation. He is the author of numerous books, including Breaking the News: How the Media Undermines American Democracy and China Airborne; as well as Blind Into Baghdad and Postcards From Tomorrow Square, which are based on his writings for The Atlantic.
Morning Lecture: Elaine Weiss; author,    Amphitheater
Elaine Weiss is an award-winning journalist and author whose most recent work, The Woman’s Hour: The Great Fight to Win the Vote, is an account of one of the greatest political battles in American history: the ratification of the constitutional amendment that granted women the right to vote. Weiss opens the week on “The Women’s Vote Centennial and Beyond” with a discussion of her highly acclaimed book, which last year was optioned by Steven Spielberg’s Amblin Television for either a TV movie or limited series. Hillary Clinton will serve as executive producer on the project. Weiss’ work has appeared in The Atlantic, Harper’s, The New York Times, The Boston Globe, The Philadelphia Inquirer, and The Christian Science Monitor, as well as in reports and documentaries for National Public Radio and Voice of America. Her magazine feature writing has been recognized with prizes from the Society of Professional Journalists, and her long-form writing garnered a Pushcart Prize “Editor’s Choice” award. A MacDowell Colony Fellow, Weiss is also the author of Fruits of Victory: The Woman’s Land Army in the Great War, an inspiring story of a long-forgotten women’s movement. Weiss has worked as a Washington correspondent, congressional aide and speechwriter, magazine editor, and university journalism instructor. She holds a graduate degree from the Medill School of Journalism of Northwestern University.
Interfaith Lecture Series: Sr. Joan Chittister, OSB    Hall of Philosophy
Joan Chittister is one of the most articulate social analysts and influential religious leaders of this age. For over 40 years she has dedicated herself to advocating for universal recognition of the critical questions impacting the global community. Courageous, passionate, and charged with energy, she is a much-sought after speaker, commentator, counselor, and clear voice across all religions. A Benedictine Sister of Erie, PA, Sister Joan is an international lecturer and award-winning author of 60 books. She has won 16 Catholic Press Association awards as well as numerous awards for her work for justice, peace, and equality, especially for women, in church and in society. Her latest book, The Time is Now: a call for uncommon courage, was published by Random House in spring 2019 and quickly become a best-seller. Sister Joan is an international and national lecturer who has been a guest on “Super Soul Sunday” with Oprah Winfrey in 2015 and in 2019. Additionally, she has been an interview guest on countless podcasts, radio programs, and for magazines and documentaries. A founding member of The Global Peace Initiative of Women, a partner organization of the UN, she works to develop a worldwide network of women peace builders. As co-chair of this group she has facilitated gatherings of spiritual leaders throughout the world in an effort to spread an interfaith commitment to peace building, equality and justice for all peoples. Sister Joan has served as president of the Leadership Conference of Women Religious, an organization of the leaders/superiors of Catholic religious women in the US, and was prioress of the Benedictine Sisters of Erie for 12 years. A regular online columnist for the National Catholic Reporter, she has received numerous awards and recognition for her work as well as 12 honorary degrees from US colleges and universities. Sister Joan received her Master’s degree from the University of Notre Dame and her doctorate from Penn State University in Speech Communications Theory. In 1996 she was an elected fellow at St. Edmund's College, Cambridge University, and the Von Huegel lecturer there. She is the founder and executive director of Benetvision, a resource and research center for contemporary spirituality located in Erie. She is one of Chautauqua’s treasures, having presented lectures at Chautauqua for over 30 years. As part of their City Makers: American Futures project in partnership with The Atlantic and Marketplace, the Fallowses visited smaller and medium-sized cities, meeting civic leaders, factory workers, recent immigrants, and young entrepreneurs to take the pulse and understand the prospects of places that usually draw notice only after a disaster or during a political campaign. The Fallowses’ book, Our Towns, is the story of their journey — and an account of a country busy remaking itself, despite the challenges and paralysis of national politics. London-based national correspondent James Fallows has written for The Atlantic since the late 1970s, living and reporting in Seattle, Berkeley, Austin, Tokyo, Kuala Lumpur, Shanghai, and Beijing. In addition to working for The Atlantic, he spent two years as chief White House speechwriter for Jimmy Carter and two years as the editor of US News & World Report. James Fallows has been a finalist for the National Magazine Award five times and has won once; he has also won the American Book Award for nonfiction and a N.Y. Emmy award for the documentary series “Doing Business in China.” He was the founding chairman of the New America Foundation. He is the author of numerous books, including Breaking the News: How the Media Undermines American Democracy and China Airborne; as well as Blind Into Baghdad and Postcards From Tomorrow Square, which are based on his writings for The Atlantic.
Morning Lecture: Kimberly Churches; CEO, American Associat..    Amphitheater
Kimberly Churches is the chief executive officer of the American Association of University Women, a leading voice in advancing equity for women and girls through research, advocacy and education. In her first visit to Chautauqua, Churches will discuss gender equity through a past, present and future lens, and explore why barriers still exist, how intersectionality and inclusion is or is not at play, and what roles policymakers, employers, education and individuals can play in closing the gaps once and for all. Prior to joining AAUW, Churches was the managing director of the Brookings Institution, an internationally recognized public policy think tank. She also served as associate vice chancellor at the University of Denver, a director of development at the University of North Florida, and a division director at the American Heart Association. She has extensive experience working collaboratively on education as well as on capacity building among grassroots groups and national and international nonprofits. In addition to her work at AAUW, Churches is the current chair of the BUILD Metro DC board, which focuses on the power of experiential learning through entrepreneurship for under-resourced communities, and the board treasurer of 1455, a new center for the literary arts in Virginia. She also serves as a director on the board of the Leadership Conference on Civil & Human Rights, and is a member of the International Women’s Forum of Washington, D.C., and the Association of Fundraising Professionals.
Interfaith Lecture Series: Mirabai Starr    Hall of Philosophy
Mirabai Starr is an award-winning author of creative nonfiction and contemporary translations of sacred literature. She taught Philosophy and World Religions at the University of New Mexico-Taos for twenty years, and now teaches and speaks internationally on contemplative practice and inter-spiritual dialog. A certified bereavement counselor, Mirabai helps mourners harness the transformational power of loss. Her latest book is WILD MERCY: Living the Fierce & Tender Wisdom of the Women Mystics. In Wild Mercy, Mirabai turns her encyclopedic knowledge of all wisdom traditions and rituals to the women mystics she so loves and lives by – to Mother Earth, to the mothers of all ages and all genders who have nourished and comforted – giving life, joy, healing, and light by which to see anew. She affirms that “The feminine… is shifting the global paradigm from one of dominance and individualized salvation to one of collective awakening and service to all beings.” Mirabai is on the 2020 Watkins List of the “100 Most Spiritually Influential Living People of the World.” She is often among the guest faculty at Fr. Richard Rohr’s Center for Action and Contemplation, and is frequently quoted in the Center’s publications. She is also a legacy teacher in Ram Dass’ lineage. Mirabai lives with her extended family in the mountains of northern New Mexico. As part of their City Makers: American Futures project in partnership with The Atlantic and Marketplace, the Fallowses visited smaller and medium-sized cities, meeting civic leaders, factory workers, recent immigrants, and young entrepreneurs to take the pulse and understand the prospects of places that usually draw notice only after a disaster or during a political campaign. The Fallowses’ book, Our Towns, is the story of their journey — and an account of a country busy remaking itself, despite the challenges and paralysis of national politics. London-based national correspondent James Fallows has written for The Atlantic since the late 1970s, living and reporting in Seattle, Berkeley, Austin, Tokyo, Kuala Lumpur, Shanghai, and Beijing. In addition to working for The Atlantic, he spent two years as chief White House speechwriter for Jimmy Carter and two years as the editor of US News & World Report. James Fallows has been a finalist for the National Magazine Award five times and has won once; he has also won the American Book Award for nonfiction and a N.Y. Emmy award for the documentary series “Doing Business in China.” He was the founding chairman of the New America Foundation. He is the author of numerous books, including Breaking the News: How the Media Undermines American Democracy and China Airborne; as well as Blind Into Baghdad and Postcards From Tomorrow Square, which are based on his writings for The Atlantic.
Morning Lecture: Carol Jenkins; Co-President, CEO, ERA Coa..    Amphitheater
Carol Jenkins is Co-President and CEO of the ERA Coalition and the Fund for Women’s Equality, sister organizations dedicated to the passage and enactment of the Equal Rights Amendment. The Coalition is comprised of over 100 organizations and leaders across the country, and provides research, education and advocacy on the issues of constitutional equality, working on the state and federal levels with advocates and legislators. In April 2019 the Coalition was instrumental in bringing about the first hearing in Congress on the ERA in 36 years; in her first visit to Chautauqua, Jenkins will discuss this progress on what she calls an “extremely essential” Constitutional amendment. A women’s rights activist, author and Emmy Award-winning former television journalist, Jenkins hosts the three-time New York Emmy-nominated interview show, “Black America,” on CUNY TV, and is also executive producer, writer and correspondent of its documentaries. Founding president of The Women’s Media Center and a pioneering African American television reporter, Jenkins was an anchor and correspondent for WNBC-TV in New York for nearly 25 years. She hosted “Carol Jenkins Live,” her own daily talk show, on WNYW-TV. Early in her career she co-hosted one of the first daily public affairs programs in New York City, “Straight Talk” on WOR-TV; and co-hosted “Positively Black” for WNBC TV, one of the earliest television programs dedicated to Black issues in the United States. She was a 2017 recipient of the Sackler First Award, given to women who are pioneers in their fields. Among other numerous honors are the Lifetime Achievement and International Reporting Awards from The Association of Black Journalists/NY; the 2008 Women’s Equality Award from The National Council of Women’s Organizations; and the North Star News Prize. Jenkins earned a B.A. from Boston University and an M.A. from New York University; both institutions have honored her as a Distinguished Alumna.
CLSC Author Presentation: Susan Straight,    Hall of Philosophy
Susan Straight, In the Country of Women is a valuable social history and a personal narrative that reads like a love song to America and indomitable women. In inland Southern California, near the desert and the Mexican border, Susan Straight, a self-proclaimed book nerd, and Dwayne Sims, an African American basketball player, started dating in high school. After college, they married and drove to Amherst, Massachusetts, where Straight met her teacher and mentor, James Baldwin, who encouraged her to write. Once back in Riverside, Straight—and eventually her three daughters—heard for decades the stories of Dwayne’s female ancestors. Some women escaped violence in post-slavery Tennessee, some escaped murder in Jim Crow Mississippi, and some fled abusive men. Straight’s mother-in-law, Alberta Sims, is the descendant at the heart of this memoir. Straight’s family, too, reflects the hardship and resilience of women pushing onward—from Switzerland, Canada, and the Colorado Rockies to California. Susan Straight has published eight novels. She was a finalist for the National Book Award, the Los Angeles Times Book Prize, and the National Magazine Award. She is the recipient of the Robert Kirsch Award for lifetime achievement from the Los Angeles Times Book Prize, the Edgar Award for Best Short Story, the O. Henry Prize, the Lannan Literary Award for Fiction, and a Guggenheim Fellowship. Her stories and essays have been published in The New Yorker, The New York Times, the Los Angeles Times, The Guardian, Granta, McSweeney's, Black Clock, Harper's, and other journals. She was born in Riverside, California, where she lives with her family.
Interfaith Lecture Series:Michael Martin    Hall of Philosophy
Michael Martin is the executive Director of the Native American Community Services of Erie and Niagara Counties, Inc. He is an Onondaga of the Beaver Clan from the Six Nations of the Grand River territory in Southern Ontario, but was born and raised in Buffalo, New York, and currently resides in North Tonawanda, NY. Mr. Martin is a graduate of both Babson College with an MS in Accounting and Entrepreneurial Finance, and SUNY Buffalo State College with a BS in Economics, which included one year on exchange at the University of Hawaii at Manoa. In February of 2004 he was named the Executive Director of Native American Community Services of Erie and Niagara Counties, Inc. (NACS), after having served in an interim capacity since July of 2003. In 2016, he was named by his Clan Mother as a Faithkeeper for his Onondaga, Beaver Clan. He was formally acknowledged with his Chief by the Haudenosaunee Confederacy condolence in June of 2018. Prior to joining NACS, Mr. Martin had started his own company, “XLerent Services,” which focused on consulting, personal coaching, and organizational development to help individuals and companies to “accel,” excel, transform, and perform. In his earlier career, he held senior financial and business management positions with such companies as AT&T, Lucent Technologies, and Praxair. Most importantly, he is a proud father of his son Dawit with whom he shares a love of lacrosse, with Michael often helping with his son’s teams as either a manager, coach, or trainer. Mr. Martin’s honors and awards include: a 2019 Honorary Doctorate Degree in Humane Letters from Medaille College in Buffalo; the 2019 Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. Dream Award for Racial Relationship Building in the City of Buffalo, presented by Mayor Byron Brown; a 2018 Tradition Bearers for Bio-Cultural Diversity Fellowship from Seventh Generation Fund for Indigenous Peoples (CA); and the 2010 National Federation for Just Communities, Inc. Community Leader Award for Community Service. As part of their City Makers: American Futures project in partnership with The Atlantic and Marketplace, the Fallowses visited smaller and medium-sized cities, meeting civic leaders, factory workers, recent immigrants, and young entrepreneurs to take the pulse and understand the prospects of places that usually draw notice only after a disaster or during a political campaign. The Fallowses’ book, Our Towns, is the story of their journey — and an account of a country busy remaking itself, despite the challenges and paralysis of national politics. London-based national correspondent James Fallows has written for The Atlantic since the late 1970s, living and reporting in Seattle, Berkeley, Austin, Tokyo, Kuala Lumpur, Shanghai, and Beijing. In addition to working for The Atlantic, he spent two years as chief White House speechwriter for Jimmy Carter and two years as the editor of US News & World Report. James Fallows has been a finalist for the National Magazine Award five times and has won once; he has also won the American Book Award for nonfiction and a N.Y. Emmy award for the documentary series “Doing Business in China.” He was the founding chairman of the New America Foundation. He is the author of numerous books, including Breaking the News: How the Media Undermines American Democracy and China Airborne; as well as Blind Into Baghdad and Postcards From Tomorrow Square, which are based on his writings for The Atlantic.
Morning Lecture: Sir Ken Robinson; Professor Emeritus, Uni..    Amphitheater
Sir Ken Robinson is an internationally recognized leader in the development of education, creativity and innovation, who works with governments, education systems, international agencies, global corporations and some of the world’s leading cultural organizations to unlock the creative energy of people and organizations. The most watched speaker in TED’s history, Robinson’s 2006 talk, “Do Schools Kill Creativity” has been viewed online over 60 million times and seen by an estimated 380 million people in 160 countries. He opens Chautauqua’s week on “Rebuilding Public Education” with a sweeping look at the state of education in the United States. For 12 years, Robinson was professor of arts education at the University of Warwick in the United Kingdom, where he is now professor emeritus. In 1999, he led a national commission on creativity, education and the economy for the UK Government. All Our Futures: Creativity, Culture and Education (The Robinson Report) was published to wide acclaim. He was the central figure in developing a strategy for creative and economic development as part of the Peace Process in Northern Ireland, working with the ministers for training, education enterprise and culture. The resulting blueprint for change, Unlocking Creativity, was adopted by politicians of all parties and by business, education and cultural leaders across the Province. He was one of four international advisors to the Singapore Government for its strategy to become the creative hub of Southeast Asia, and the guiding force in Oklahoma’s statewide strategy to cultivate creativity and innovation in culture, commerce and education. A New York Times bestselling author, his books include The Element: How Finding Your Passion Changes Everything; Out of Our Minds: Learning to be Creative; and, most recently, Creative Schools: The Grassroots Revolution That’s Transforming Education. Fast Company calls him “one of the world’s elite thinkers on creativity and innovation” and he was named as one of Time/Fortune/CNN’s Principal Voices. He has been honored with the Athena Award of the Rhode Island School of Design for services to the arts and education; the Peabody Medal for contributions to the arts and culture in the United States; the LEGO Prize for international achievement in education; the Benjamin Franklin Medal of the Royal Society of Arts for outstanding contributions to cultural relations between the United Kingdom and the United States, and the Nelson Mandela Changemaker Award. In 2003, he received a knighthood from Queen Elizabeth II for his services to the arts. Robinson received his Bachelor of Education at Bretton Hall College of Education, and completed his PhD at the University of London.
Interfaith Lecture Series: Judy Beals    Hall of Philosophy
Judy Beals is the Associate Director of Harvard Divinity School’s Religious Literacy Project (RLP). Working with Dr. Diane Moore and her team, she provides overall leadership in building the institutional foundation, strategy, and sustainability of the RLP and its core programs. The RLP’s Religious Literacy and Education Initiative (RLEI) advances the public understanding of religion through active and ongoing support to educators with particular focus on those teaching at the 7-12th grade and community college levels. It provides resources, training, and support to help educators advance religious literacy through core humanities and social science curricula (history, literature, art, social studies) and through traditions-based coursework. Because religion is embedded in all aspects of culture, the RLEI seeks to help educators identify the religious dimensions of their existing coursework and teach it in pedagogically rich and constitutionally sound ways. We believe that by advancing a more complex understanding of the roles religions play in both history and contemporary affairs, educators can train students to be active participants in building a more just and peaceful society. Judy joined the Religious Literacy Project in 2017. She is an attorney with more than 25 years of experience in civil and human rights advocacy, public policy development, campaigning, and nonprofit and public management. She has served in the U.S. Senate, as a state Assistant Attorney General, and as a nonprofit CEO. Most recently, Judy served in senior roles at Oxfam America which has partnered with the RLP to advance religious literacy in humanitarian action. As part of their City Makers: American Futures project in partnership with The Atlantic and Marketplace, the Fallowses visited smaller and medium-sized cities, meeting civic leaders, factory workers, recent immigrants, and young entrepreneurs to take the pulse and understand the prospects of places that usually draw notice only after a disaster or during a political campaign. The Fallowses’ book, Our Towns, is the story of their journey — and an account of a country busy remaking itself, despite the challenges and paralysis of national politics. London-based national correspondent James Fallows has written for The Atlantic since the late 1970s, living and reporting in Seattle, Berkeley, Austin, Tokyo, Kuala Lumpur, Shanghai, and Beijing. In addition to working for The Atlantic, he spent two years as chief White House speechwriter for Jimmy Carter and two years as the editor of US News & World Report. James Fallows has been a finalist for the National Magazine Award five times and has won once; he has also won the American Book Award for nonfiction and a N.Y. Emmy award for the documentary series “Doing Business in China.” He was the founding chairman of the New America Foundation. He is the author of numerous books, including Breaking the News: How the Media Undermines American Democracy and China Airborne; as well as Blind Into Baghdad and Postcards From Tomorrow Square, which are based on his writings for The Atlantic.
Morning Lecture: Zaretta Hammond; educator, author,    Amphitheater
Zaretta Hammond is a former classroom English teacher who has been doing instructional design, school coaching, and professional development around the issues of equity, literacy, and culturally responsive teaching for nearly two decades — critical work within public education which she will discuss in her first visit to Chautauqua. Hammond is the author of Culturally Responsive Teaching and The Brain: Promoting Authentic Engagement and Rigor Among Culturally and Linguistically Diverse Students, in which she draws on cutting-edge neuroscience research to offer educators an innovative approach for designing and implementing culturally responsive instruction grounded in the science of learning. In the past, she has been on staff at education reform organizations, such as the National Equity Project and has taught in the teacher preparation program at Saint Mary’s College in Moraga, California. As a consultant, she works widely with school districts, charter school organizations, regional education service agencies, and coaching organizations across the country on ways to support students to accelerate their own learning through a responsive social-emotional learning model. In addition to consulting, Hammond is involved in a number of working groups and foundation advisory committees focused on understanding the science of learning through an equity lens. Along with a deep interest in culturally responsive teaching, Hammond has a strong research agenda around equity-focused literacy, vocabulary development, and writing development across disciplines. Hammond currents sits on the Board of Trustees of the Center for Collaborative Classroom, a national literacy provider. She shares research and observations from the field on her blog CRTandtheBrain.com blog. Hammond attended the University of California, Berkeley, as an undergrad, before completing her degree at New York University. She earned a Masters in Secondary English Education with a concentration in Writing Instruction at the University of Colorado, Boulder.
Interfaith Lecture Series: Benjamin P. Marcus    Hall of Philosophy
Benjamin P. Marcus is the religious literacy specialist with the Religious Freedom Center of the Freedom Forum Institute, where he examines the intersection of education, religious literacy, and identity formation in the United States. He has developed religious literacy programs for public schools, universities, businesses, U.S. government organizations, and private foundations, and he has delivered presentations on religion and education in the U.S. and abroad. He has worked closely with the U.S. State Department, International Baccalaureate, Interfaith Youth Core, and the Cambridge Inter-Faith Programme in the United Kingdom. He is a special advisor to the Foundation for Religious Literacy. In February 2018, Marcus was accepted as a Fulbright Specialist for a period of three years. As a Specialist, he traveled to Albania to share his expertise on religion and education with government and civil society institutions. Marcus chaired the writing group for the Religious Studies Companion Document to the C3 Framework, a nationally recognized set of guidelines used by state and school district curriculum experts for social studies standards and curriculum development. He is a contributing author in the Oxford Handbook on Religion and American Education, where he writes about the importance of religious literacy education. In 2015 he served as executive editor of the White Paper of the Sub-Working Group on Religion and Conflict Mitigation of the State Department’s Religion and Foreign Policy Working Group. Marcus earned an MTS with a concentration in Religion, Ethics, and Politics as a Presidential Scholar at Harvard Divinity School. He studied religion at the University of Cambridge and Brown University, where he graduated magna cum laude. As part of their City Makers: American Futures project in partnership with The Atlantic and Marketplace, the Fallowses visited smaller and medium-sized cities, meeting civic leaders, factory workers, recent immigrants, and young entrepreneurs to take the pulse and understand the prospects of places that usually draw notice only after a disaster or during a political campaign. The Fallowses’ book, Our Towns, is the story of their journey — and an account of a country busy remaking itself, despite the challenges and paralysis of national politics. London-based national correspondent James Fallows has written for The Atlantic since the late 1970s, living and reporting in Seattle, Berkeley, Austin, Tokyo, Kuala Lumpur, Shanghai, and Beijing. In addition to working for The Atlantic, he spent two years as chief White House speechwriter for Jimmy Carter and two years as the editor of US News & World Report. James Fallows has been a finalist for the National Magazine Award five times and has won once; he has also won the American Book Award for nonfiction and a N.Y. Emmy award for the documentary series “Doing Business in China.” He was the founding chairman of the New America Foundation. He is the author of numerous books, including Breaking the News: How the Media Undermines American Democracy and China Airborne; as well as Blind Into Baghdad and Postcards From Tomorrow Square, which are based on his writings for The Atlantic.
Morning Lecture: Jeb Bush; Founder and president, Foundati..    Amphitheater
Jeb Bush was the 43rd governor of the State of Florida, serving from 1999 through 2007. He was the third Republican elected to the state’s highest office and the first Republican in the state’s history to be reelected. He was most recently a candidate for the Republican presidential nomination in 2016. He is also president and chairman of the board of directors of the Foundation for Excellence in Education, a national non-profit organization he founded to work with education leaders, teachers, parents and advocates to develop and implement reforms that lead to rising student achievement. The first member of the Bush family to speak on the Amphitheater stage since Barbara Bush lectured in 1987, Bush will discuss the work being done by ExcelinEd to foster bold and transformational education reform. During his time as governor, Bush cut taxes, vetoed earmarks and championed major reform of government programs. He championed major reform of government, in areas ranging from health care and environmental protection to civil service and tax reform. His top priority was the overhaul of the state’s failing education system. Under Bush’s leadership, Florida established a bold accountability system in public schools and created the most ambitious school choice programs in the nation. Today, Florida remains a national leader in education and is one of the only states in the nation to significantly narrow the achievement gap. Bush joined the University of Pennsylvania as a non-resident Presidential Professor of Practice for the 2018-19 academic year. He has previously served as a visiting professor and fellow at Harvard University, an executive professor at Texas A&M University, and has been awarded several honorary doctorates from collegiate institutions across the country. Governor Bush has been recognized for his contributions to public policy by national organizations including the Manhattan Institute, The Lynde and Harry Bradley Foundation and the Jack Kemp Foundation. He currently serves as chairman of Finback Investments Partners LLC and Dock Square Capital LLC, both merchant banks headquartered in Coral Gables. He is a Phi Beta Kappa graduate of University of Texas at Austin, where he earned a bachelor’s degree in Latin American Studies.
Interfaith Lecture Series: Linda K. Wertheimer    Hall of Philosophy
Linda K. Wertheimer is the award-winning author of Faith Ed, Teaching about Religion in An Age of Intolerance (Beacon Press, 2015). She was a full-time journalist, including serving as The Boston Globe’s education editor and covering education for The Dallas Morning News and The Orlando Sentinel, for nearly 25 years before turning to freelancing, writing books, and public speaking. Her commentaries, essays and long-form journalism have appeared in many publications, including The Atlantic, The Washington Post, The Boston Globe Magazine, and The New York Times. Since Faith Ed was published, she has given talks around the country about the power of education to fight religious bigotry, religious minority youths’ experiences, and challenges educators face when teaching about religion. Her speaking engagements have included talks at Harvard Divinity School; Boston College’s Boisi Center for Religion and American Public Life; Northwestern University, her alma mater; and the National Council of the Social Studies annual conference. She has appeared on CNN and CBS national television programs and been interviewed on numerous NPR regional radio shows and podcasts. Linda, who was a 2017 prose writer-in-residence at the Chautauqua Writers’ Center, also teaches essay and commentary writing at Grub Street in Boston. An avid tennis player and fan of kayaking, singing, and making mosaic art, she lives outside of Boston with her husband and son. As part of their City Makers: American Futures project in partnership with The Atlantic and Marketplace, the Fallowses visited smaller and medium-sized cities, meeting civic leaders, factory workers, recent immigrants, and young entrepreneurs to take the pulse and understand the prospects of places that usually draw notice only after a disaster or during a political campaign. The Fallowses’ book, Our Towns, is the story of their journey — and an account of a country busy remaking itself, despite the challenges and paralysis of national politics. London-based national correspondent James Fallows has written for The Atlantic since the late 1970s, living and reporting in Seattle, Berkeley, Austin, Tokyo, Kuala Lumpur, Shanghai, and Beijing. In addition to working for The Atlantic, he spent two years as chief White House speechwriter for Jimmy Carter and two years as the editor of US News & World Report. James Fallows has been a finalist for the National Magazine Award five times and has won once; he has also won the American Book Award for nonfiction and a N.Y. Emmy award for the documentary series “Doing Business in China.” He was the founding chairman of the New America Foundation. He is the author of numerous books, including Breaking the News: How the Media Undermines American Democracy and China Airborne; as well as Blind Into Baghdad and Postcards From Tomorrow Square, which are based on his writings for The Atlantic.
Interfaith Lecture Series: Ari L. Goldman    Hall of Philosophy
Ari L. Goldman has taught at the Colombia Journalism School since 1993. He is the director of the school’s Scripps Howard Program in Religion, Journalism, and the Spiritual Life. The Scripps Program has enabled Professor Goldman to take students in his “Covering Religion” seminars on funded study-tours abroad during spring break. In the past, his class has visited India, Russia, Ukraine, Ireland, Italy, Israel, Jordan and the West Bank. In addition to the religion seminar, Professor Goldman also teaches Reporting, the Master’s Project, and the course “The Journalism of Death & Dying,” which looks at everything from writing obituaries to covering natural disasters and suicide. Before coming to Columbia, Goldman spent 20 years at The New York Times, most of it as a religion writer. In addition, he covered New York State politics, transportation and education. He was educated at Yeshiva University, Harvard, and Columbia. Goldman was a Visiting Fulbright Professor at Hebrew University in Jerusalem; a Skirball Fellow at the Oxford Centre for Hebrew and Jewish Studies in England; and a scholar-in-residence for a semester at Yeshiva’s Stern College for Women. In addition to his teaching on the university level, Goldman is on the faculty of the School of The New York Times, where his course, “Writing the Big City: Covering New York,” is one of the most popular offerings. Open to high school students of all ages, it includes a unit on religion. He occasionally contributes articles and reviews to The New York Times, The Washington Post, Salon, The New York Jewish Week, and the Forward. As part of their City Makers: American Futures project in partnership with The Atlantic and Marketplace, the Fallowses visited smaller and medium-sized cities, meeting civic leaders, factory workers, recent immigrants, and young entrepreneurs to take the pulse and understand the prospects of places that usually draw notice only after a disaster or during a political campaign. The Fallowses’ book, Our Towns, is the story of their journey — and an account of a country busy remaking itself, despite the challenges and paralysis of national politics. London-based national correspondent James Fallows has written for The Atlantic since the late 1970s, living and reporting in Seattle, Berkeley, Austin, Tokyo, Kuala Lumpur, Shanghai, and Beijing. In addition to working for The Atlantic, he spent two years as chief White House speechwriter for Jimmy Carter and two years as the editor of US News & World Report. James Fallows has been a finalist for the National Magazine Award five times and has won once; he has also won the American Book Award for nonfiction and a N.Y. Emmy award for the documentary series “Doing Business in China.” He was the founding chairman of the New America Foundation. He is the author of numerous books, including Breaking the News: How the Media Undermines American Democracy and China Airborne; as well as Blind Into Baghdad and Postcards From Tomorrow Square, which are based on his writings for The Atlantic.
Morning Lecture: Carey M. Wright, Mississippi Superintende..    Amphitheater
Carey M. Wright has served as State Superintendent of Education for Mississippi since 2013. Under her leadership, Mississippi has initiated aggressive education reforms that have resulted in unprecedented academic success and rising student achievement — work that Wright will share to close a week on “Rebuilding Public Education.” Wright spearheaded initiatives in Mississippi that pushed student achievement on the National Assessment of Educational Progress to improve at a faster rate than most other states, nearly doubled the Advancement Placement participation and success rate, more than tripled the number of school districts with more than 45 percent of students scoring proficient or advanced in English Language Arts and Mathematics, and pushed Mississippi’s graduation rate to an all-time high of 84 percent. Wright also implemented Mississippi’s first publicly funded Early Learning Collaborative program. Prior to her appointment as State Superintendent for Mississippi, Wright served as chief academic officer and the deputy chief for the Office of Teaching and Learning for the District of Columbia Public Schools and as a consultant to the Harvard Business School Public Education Leadership Project. Wright previously served as associate superintendent for the Office of Special Education and Student Services for the Montgomery County Public Schools in Maryland and spent the earlier part of her career in Howard County Public Schools as a teacher, a principal, and the director of Special Education and Student Services. She began her career as a teacher in Prince George’s County Public Schools in Maryland. Wright has been recognized as an outstanding educator by the National Center for Culturally Responsive Systems, nominated twice for The Washington Post’s Outstanding Principal Award, and awarded the Howard County Chamber of Commerce Outstanding Educator of the Year. Wright obtained her bachelor, master, and doctoral degrees from the University of Maryland, College Park.
Interfaith Lecture Series: Rabbi Chaim Seidler-Feller    Hall of Philosophy
Rabbi Chaim Seidler-Feller recently celebrated his fortieth year of working with students and faculty as the Executive Director of the Yitzhak Rabin Hillel Center for Jewish Life at UCLA, for which he is currently Director Emeritus. He was ordained in 1971 at Yeshiva University, where he completed a Masters in Rabbinic Literature. Rabbi Seidler-Feller has also been a lecturer in the Departments of Sociology and Near Eastern Languages and Cultures at UCLA, and in the Department of Theological Studies at Loyola Marymount University. He is also a faculty member of the Shalom Hartman Institute North America, and of the Wexner Heritage Foundation. He was the founding director of the Hartman Fellowship for Campus Professionals and a founding member of Americans for Peace Now. In 2014 Rabbi Seidler-Feller initiated a fact-finding mission for non-Jewish student leaders to Israel and the Palestine Authority, which is now offered on sixty campuses across the country. The International Hillel Center has granted Chaim the Hillel Professional Recognition Award “for blending the love of Jewish tradition with the modern intellectual approach of the university.” Chaim was a rabbinic consultant to Barbra Streisand during the making of the film Yentl. He is married to Dr. Doreen Seidler-Feller, a clinical psychologist, and is the father of Shulie, a photojournalist and Shaul, recently ordained and currently serving as a Judaica consultant at Sotheby’s while pursuing a doctorate in Jewish History at the Hebrew University. As part of their City Makers: American Futures project in partnership with The Atlantic and Marketplace, the Fallowses visited smaller and medium-sized cities, meeting civic leaders, factory workers, recent immigrants, and young entrepreneurs to take the pulse and understand the prospects of places that usually draw notice only after a disaster or during a political campaign. The Fallowses’ book, Our Towns, is the story of their journey — and an account of a country busy remaking itself, despite the challenges and paralysis of national politics. London-based national correspondent James Fallows has written for The Atlantic since the late 1970s, living and reporting in Seattle, Berkeley, Austin, Tokyo, Kuala Lumpur, Shanghai, and Beijing. In addition to working for The Atlantic, he spent two years as chief White House speechwriter for Jimmy Carter and two years as the editor of US News & World Report. James Fallows has been a finalist for the National Magazine Award five times and has won once; he has also won the American Book Award for nonfiction and a N.Y. Emmy award for the documentary series “Doing Business in China.” He was the founding chairman of the New America Foundation. He is the author of numerous books, including Breaking the News: How the Media Undermines American Democracy and China Airborne; as well as Blind Into Baghdad and Postcards From Tomorrow Square, which are based on his writings for The Atlantic.
Interfaith Lecture Series: Barbara Brown Taylor    Hall of Philosophy
Barbara Brown Taylor is a New York Times best-selling author, teacher, and Episcopal priest. Her first memoir, Leaving Church (2006), won an Author of the Year award from the Georgia Writers Association. Her book, Learning to Walk in the Dark (2014), was featured on the cover of TIME magazine. She has served on the faculties of Piedmont College, Columbia Theological Seminary, Candler School of Theology at Emory University, McAfee School of Theology at Mercer University, and the Certificate in Theological Studies program at Arrendale State Prison for Women in Alto, Georgia. In 2014 TIME included her on its annual list of Most Influential People; in 2015 she was named Georgia Woman of the Year; and in 2016 she received The President’s Medal at the Chautauqua Institution in New York. She currently serves on the Board of Trustees for Mercer University, and is receiving international acclaim for her fourteenth book, Holy Envy (HarperOne, April 2019). Her work has been translated into five languages. Barbara has served five times as a beloved Chaplain of the Week at Chautauqua, and graced us with her wisdom in 2019 during our week focusing on Grace: A Celebration of extraordinary Gifts. As part of their City Makers: American Futures project in partnership with The Atlantic and Marketplace, the Fallowses visited smaller and medium-sized cities, meeting civic leaders, factory workers, recent immigrants, and young entrepreneurs to take the pulse and understand the prospects of places that usually draw notice only after a disaster or during a political campaign. The Fallowses’ book, Our Towns, is the story of their journey — and an account of a country busy remaking itself, despite the challenges and paralysis of national politics. London-based national correspondent James Fallows has written for The Atlantic since the late 1970s, living and reporting in Seattle, Berkeley, Austin, Tokyo, Kuala Lumpur, Shanghai, and Beijing. In addition to working for The Atlantic, he spent two years as chief White House speechwriter for Jimmy Carter and two years as the editor of US News & World Report. James Fallows has been a finalist for the National Magazine Award five times and has won once; he has also won the American Book Award for nonfiction and a N.Y. Emmy award for the documentary series “Doing Business in China.” He was the founding chairman of the New America Foundation. He is the author of numerous books, including Breaking the News: How the Media Undermines American Democracy and China Airborne; as well as Blind Into Baghdad and Postcards From Tomorrow Square, which are based on his writings for The Atlantic.
Interfaith Lecture Series: Rabbi Naomi Levy    Hall of Philosophy
Rabbi Naomi Levy is the founder of Nashuva, a groundbreaking Jewish outreach community, based in Los Angeles. During Week Seven she will weave tapestries of spiritual truth that reveal the spirituality of “Us” from a Jewish perspective. A unique and passionate voice in the contemporary Jewish world, Naomi attended Cornell University, where she graduated Phi Beta Kappa and Summa Cum Laude. She was in the first class of women to attend The Jewish Theological Seminary’s Rabbinical School and the first female Conservative Rabbi to head a pulpit on the West Coast. Through Nashuva, Naomi has drawn thousands of unaffiliated Jews back to Judaism with a soulful approach, linking together prayer, spirituality and social justice. Rabbi Levy’s High Holidays Live webcast gives tens of thousands across the globe a chance to find uplift and deep meaning in Judaism. Naomi is a best-selling author, has appeared on NBC’s Today Show and on Oprah, and has been featured in NPR, Parade, Redbook, Self, LA Times, Boston Globe, Good Housekeeping, and LA magazine. Books authored by Naomi include To Begin Again; Talking to God; Hope Will Find You; and Einstein and the Rabbi: Searching for the Soul (Winner of the 2017 Nautilus Prize). Nashuva just released an album of prayers, featured in Billboard Magazine! and produced by Grammy Award winning music legend Don Was (Rolling Stones, Bonnie Raitt, John Mayer, Bob Dylan): Heaven on Earth: Songs of the Soul. Newsweek included Naomi in its “Top 50 Rabbis in America” list, and the Jewish Forward listed Rabbi Levy as one of the nation’s 50 most influential Jewish leaders. Naomi and her husband Rob Eshman, former publisher of the LA Jewish Journal, have two children, Adin and Noa. As part of their City Makers: American Futures project in partnership with The Atlantic and Marketplace, the Fallowses visited smaller and medium-sized cities, meeting civic leaders, factory workers, recent immigrants, and young entrepreneurs to take the pulse and understand the prospects of places that usually draw notice only after a disaster or during a political campaign. The Fallowses’ book, Our Towns, is the story of their journey — and an account of a country busy remaking itself, despite the challenges and paralysis of national politics. London-based national correspondent James Fallows has written for The Atlantic since the late 1970s, living and reporting in Seattle, Berkeley, Austin, Tokyo, Kuala Lumpur, Shanghai, and Beijing. In addition to working for The Atlantic, he spent two years as chief White House speechwriter for Jimmy Carter and two years as the editor of US News & World Report. James Fallows has been a finalist for the National Magazine Award five times and has won once; he has also won the American Book Award for nonfiction and a N.Y. Emmy award for the documentary series “Doing Business in China.” He was the founding chairman of the New America Foundation. He is the author of numerous books, including Breaking the News: How the Media Undermines American Democracy and China Airborne; as well as Blind Into Baghdad and Postcards From Tomorrow Square, which are based on his writings for The Atlantic.
Interfaith Lecture Series: Dr. Kent Nerburn    Hall of Philosophy
Dr. Kent Nerburn has been called “One of America’s living spiritual teachers” and “one of the few American writers who can respectfully bridge the gap between Native and non-Native cultures.” He is the author and editor of sixteen books on spiritual values and Native American themes, including the collections of spiritual essays: Simple Truths, Small Graces, Ordinary Sacred; Make Me an Instrument of Your Peace; Native Echoes, and Voices in the Stones, and the ground breaking creative non-fiction trilogy, Neither Wolf nor Dog: On Forgotten Roads with an Indian Elder; The Wolf at Twilight: An Indian Elder’s Journey through a Land of Ghosts and Shadows, and The Girl who Sang to the Buffalo: A Child, an Elder, and the Light from an Ancient Sky. Neither Wolf nor Dog has been made into an independent film of the same name, and Nerburn’s recounting in Make Me an Instrument of Your Peace of his time as a cab driver transporting an elderly woman to a hospice center became an internet sensation, garnering over 5 million views and resulting in its purchase by New Line Cinema for production into a major motion picture. Dr. Nerburn’s work has received praise from wide and diverse sources, both Native and non-Native. His book Letters to My Son, a collection of thoughts and essays about what constitutes a worthy manhood, was quoted by Prime Minister David Cameron in his annual Father’s Day address in 2011. The American Indian College fund called Neither Wolf nor Dog, “one of those rare works that, once you’ve read it, you can never look at the world, or at people, the same way again.” Abenaki writer and American Book Award winner, Joseph Bruchac, praised The Wolf at Twilight as “a poignant portrait of what it means to be a Native elder and a survivor of the often bitter experience of the Indian boarding schools of the twentieth century,” while Lakota writer, Joseph Marshall III, said it “offers a sensitive, insightful glimpse into a Lakota soul, a feat unattainable by most non-Native writers.” Ojibwe author Anton Treuer said The Girl Who Sang to the Buffalo “demonstrates Kent Nerburn's gift, not just to build bridges between the Native and non-Native world, but to transcend those differences with a narrative that speaks to the heart of the human experience." And Catholic theologian Richard Rohr has praised Voices in the Stones as a book that “speaks reverently of the bridge between our Judeo-Christian tradition and the spiritual gifts of the Native Americans.” From singer Robert Plant to historian Howard Zinn and novelist Louise Erdrich, Kent has garnered a following that makes him unique among American writers and cultural observers. In describing his work, Nerburn says, “Someone once called me a ‘guerilla theologian,’ and I think that is fairly accurate. I am deeply concerned with the human condition and our responsibility to the earth, the people on it, and the generations to come. I believe that we are, at heart, spiritual beings seeking spiritual meaning, and I try to honor this search wherever I discover it in the course of my daily life.” Kent Nerburn received his B.A. in American Studies summa cum laude from the University of Minnesota and his Ph.D. in Religion/Theology and Art with distinction from Graduate Theological Union in conjunction with the University of California at Berkeley. He and his wife, Louise, currently live outside of Portland, Oregon, with their geriatric yellow lab, Lucie, but think longingly on their days amid the lakes and pines of northern Minnesota and often threaten to return there. As part of their City Makers: American Futures project in partnership with The Atlantic and Marketplace, the Fallowses visited smaller and medium-sized cities, meeting civic leaders, factory workers, recent immigrants, and young entrepreneurs to take the pulse and understand the prospects of places that usually draw notice only after a disaster or during a political campaign. The Fallowses’ book, Our Towns, is the story of their journey — and an account of a country busy remaking itself, despite the challenges and paralysis of national politics. London-based national correspondent James Fallows has written for The Atlantic since the late 1970s, living and reporting in Seattle, Berkeley, Austin, Tokyo, Kuala Lumpur, Shanghai, and Beijing. In addition to working for The Atlantic, he spent two years as chief White House speechwriter for Jimmy Carter and two years as the editor of US News & World Report. James Fallows has been a finalist for the National Magazine Award five times and has won once; he has also won the American Book Award for nonfiction and a N.Y. Emmy award for the documentary series “Doing Business in China.” He was the founding chairman of the New America Foundation. He is the author of numerous books, including Breaking the News: How the Media Undermines American Democracy and China Airborne; as well as Blind Into Baghdad and Postcards From Tomorrow Square, which are based on his writings for The Atlantic.
Morning Lecture: Spencer Wells; geneticist, anthropologist..    Amphitheater
Spencer Wells is a geneticist, anthropologist, author and entrepreneur, who returns to Chautauqua to discuss the business and ethics of personal genetic information, and how that information is managed and used. For over a decade, Wells was an Explorer-in-Residence at the National Geographic Society and director of the Genographic Project, which collected and analyzed DNA samples from hundreds of thousands of people around the world in order to decipher how our ancestors populated the planet, in the process launching the consumer genomics industry. His work has taken him to more than 100 countries, where he has collaborated with everyone from heads of government and Fortune 500 corporations, to tribal chieftains eking out a precarious living in places as remote as Chad, Tajikistan and Papua New Guinea. Wells is the author of three books, including The Journey of Man: A Genetic Odyssey, which explains how genetic data has been used to trace human migrations over the past 50,000 years, when modern humans first migrated outside of Africa. Wells also produces a popular science podcast called “The Insight” and serves as an adjunct professor at the University of Texas and visiting professor at NYU-Abu Dhabi. Wells has started and run several personal genomics companies and projects including, most recently, Insitome, a genomic media company focused on immersive storytelling. Wells holds a Bachelor of Science in biology from the University of Texas at Austin, where he graduated Phi Beta Kappa, a Ph.D. in biology from Harvard University, and has conducted postdoctoral work at Stanford University and Oxford University.
Interfaith Lecture Series: Dr. Ingrid Mattson    Hall of Philosophy
Dr. Ingrid Mattson is a Muslim religious leader, a scholar of Islamic Studies, and an expert in interfaith relations. Since 2012 she has held the London and Windsor Community Chair in Islamic Studies at Huron University College at Western University in London, Canada. Dr. Mattson was born and raised in Canada, then moved to the United States to study at the University of Chicago, earning a PhD in 1999. From 1998 to 2012 she was Professor of Islamic Studies at Hartford Seminary in Connecticut where she developed and directed the first accredited graduate program for Muslim chaplains in America and served as Director of the Macdonald Center for the Study of Islam and Christian-Muslim Relations. From 2001-2010 Dr. Mattson served as vice-president, then as president of the Indiana-based Islamic Society of North America, the first woman to serve in either position. In that position she established an Office of Interfaith and Community Engagement in Washington, DC, and facilitated new partnerships with religious and civic organizations. Her writings, both academic and public, focus primarily on Qur’an interpretation, Islamic theological ethics, and interfaith relations. Her book, The Story of the Qur’an, is an academic best-seller and was distributed to libraries across the United States by the US National Endowment for the Humanities. Some of her writings can be found on her website: ingridmattson.org. In 2018, Dr. Mattson founded a major project to uphold the sacred inviolability (hurma) of those who enter Muslim spaces from exploitation and abuse by those holding religious power and authority. The Hurma Project is conducting research, training, and protocols for professional oversight for imams, chaplains, mosque boards, and others. Dr. Mattson is a Senior Fellow of the Royal Aal al-Bayt Institute for Islamic Thought in Amman, Jordan, is on the Board of Advisors of the Luce Foundation Theology Program, and was a member of the President Obama’s Interfaith Taskforce of the White House Office of Faith-Based and Neighborhood Partnerships. She is the recipient of numerous awards as well as honorary doctorates from Trinity College (Hartford), the Chicago Theological Seminary, and the University of Waterloo. As part of their City Makers: American Futures project in partnership with The Atlantic and Marketplace, the Fallowses visited smaller and medium-sized cities, meeting civic leaders, factory workers, recent immigrants, and young entrepreneurs to take the pulse and understand the prospects of places that usually draw notice only after a disaster or during a political campaign. The Fallowses’ book, Our Towns, is the story of their journey — and an account of a country busy remaking itself, despite the challenges and paralysis of national politics. London-based national correspondent James Fallows has written for The Atlantic since the late 1970s, living and reporting in Seattle, Berkeley, Austin, Tokyo, Kuala Lumpur, Shanghai, and Beijing. In addition to working for The Atlantic, he spent two years as chief White House speechwriter for Jimmy Carter and two years as the editor of US News & World Report. James Fallows has been a finalist for the National Magazine Award five times and has won once; he has also won the American Book Award for nonfiction and a N.Y. Emmy award for the documentary series “Doing Business in China.” He was the founding chairman of the New America Foundation. He is the author of numerous books, including Breaking the News: How the Media Undermines American Democracy and China Airborne; as well as Blind Into Baghdad and Postcards From Tomorrow Square, which are based on his writings for The Atlantic.
Morning Lecture: Flynn Coleman; author,    Amphitheater
Flynn Coleman is a writer, international human rights attorney, professor, and social innovator who has worked with the United Nations, the United States federal government, and international corporations and human rights organizations around the world. Her book, A Human Algorithm: How Artificial Intelligence is Redefining Who We Are, is a groundbreaking narrative on the urgency of ethically designed AI and a guidebook to reimagining life in the era of intelligent technology. In closing a week on “The Science of Us,” Coleman will discuss her book and examine the immense impact intelligent technology will have on humanity and how we can thrive as we move into our brave new world. Coleman has written extensively on issues of global citizenship, the future of work and purpose, emerging technologies, political reconciliation, war crimes, genocide, human and civil rights, humanitarian issues, innovation and design for social impact, and improving access to justice and education. She is a contributing writer for such publications as The Boston Globe, Literary Hub, HuffPost, Global Citizen, The Next Web, Darling Magazine, Caring Magazine, Thrive Global, Nautilus Magazine, and Dame Traveler. Coleman has taught at The New School, Parsons School of Design and was the founding fellow at the Grunin Center for Law and Social Entrepreneurship at NYU School of Law. She was the founding teacher at King’s College London Dickson Poon School of Law on redefining success in the law, and is a faculty member at The School of Life and General Assembly. Among her numerous honors includes the YFU Distinguished Alum Award and an NCP Visionary Award. She holds a BSFS from Georgetown University, a JD from the University of California, Berkeley, School of Law, and an LLM from the London School of Economics and Political Science.
Interfaith Lecture Series:Kainat Felicia Norton and Muinud..    Hall of Philosophy
Kainat Felicia Norton and Muinuddin Charles Smith are senior Sufi teachers, retreat guides, and interfaith ministers within the Inayati Sufi Order. Together they founded and facilitate the Light of Guidance Center for Sufi Studies in NYC (www.lightofguidance.org). They also facilitate the Ziraat activity, devoted to inner cultivation and sacred ecology, within the Inayati Order (www.ziraat.org). Charles teaches leadership and sustainability studies at Hofstra University, and Felicia teaches at the United Nations International School. They are married and live in New York City. Felicia has been touring the solo dance/theatre piece 'NOOR', depicting the life of Noor Inayat Khan, Sufi WW2 heroine, in London, Edinburgh, UK, France, and NYC. Most recently she performed 'NOOR' at Sarah Lawrence College. Together Felicia and Charles co-authored the book, An Emerald Earth – Cultivating a Natural Spirituality and Serving Creative Beauty in Our World (www.anemeraldearth.org). This book offers basic practices, poetry, and wisdom teachings from the Sufi tradition. They travel and offer retreats and workshops throughout the US, Canada, and in Europe. As part of their City Makers: American Futures project in partnership with The Atlantic and Marketplace, the Fallowses visited smaller and medium-sized cities, meeting civic leaders, factory workers, recent immigrants, and young entrepreneurs to take the pulse and understand the prospects of places that usually draw notice only after a disaster or during a political campaign. The Fallowses’ book, Our Towns, is the story of their journey — and an account of a country busy remaking itself, despite the challenges and paralysis of national politics. London-based national correspondent James Fallows has written for The Atlantic since the late 1970s, living and reporting in Seattle, Berkeley, Austin, Tokyo, Kuala Lumpur, Shanghai, and Beijing. In addition to working for The Atlantic, he spent two years as chief White House speechwriter for Jimmy Carter and two years as the editor of US News & World Report. James Fallows has been a finalist for the National Magazine Award five times and has won once; he has also won the American Book Award for nonfiction and a N.Y. Emmy award for the documentary series “Doing Business in China.” He was the founding chairman of the New America Foundation. He is the author of numerous books, including Breaking the News: How the Media Undermines American Democracy and China Airborne; as well as Blind Into Baghdad and Postcards From Tomorrow Square, which are based on his writings for The Atlantic.
Contemporary Issues Forum: Sherrod Brown, U.S. Senator fro..    Hall of Philosophy
Connie Schultz is a Pulitzer Prize-winning, nationally syndicated columnist for Creators Syndicate, and Professional in Residence at Kent State University School of Journalism. She won the Pulitzer Prize in 2005 for Commentary for columns that judges praised for providing “a voice for the underdog and the underprivileged.” She also won the Robert F. Kennedy Award for Social Justice Reporting and the Batten Medal, which honors “a body of journalistic work that reflects compassion, courage, humanity and a deep concern for the underdog.” Schultz is the author of two books published by Random House: Life Happens – And Other Unavoidable Truths, a collection of essays, and …and His Lovely Wife, a memoir about her husband Sherrod Brown’s successful 2006 race for the U.S. Senate. Her upcoming novel, The Daughters of Erietown will also be published by Random House June 2020. Since January of 2007, U.S. Senator Sherrod Brown has held more than 300 community roundtables across Ohio’s 88 counties with students, local leaders and business owners, entrepreneurs and educators, workers and families to find ways to rebuild the economy. Brown serves as the Ranking Member of the Senate Banking Committee, and serves on the Senate Committee on Finance. He is the first Ohio Senator in 40 years to serve on the Senate Agriculture, Nutrition, and Forestry Committee. He served as chairman of the Subcommittee on Jobs, Rural Economic Growth and Energy Innovation, and is the only Ohio Senator ever to serve a full Senate term on the Veterans' Affairs Committee. Prior to serving in the Senate, Brown served as a United States Representative for the 13th District, Ohio’s Secretary of State, a member of the Ohio General Assembly, and has taught in Ohio’s public schools and at The Ohio State University. This lecture is presented in partnership with the Department of Education.
Morning Lecture: Jeffrey Rosen; president and CEO, Nationa..    Amphitheater
Jeffrey Rosen is the president and chief executive officer of the National Constitution Center, a nonpartisan nonprofit organization whose mission is to educate the public about the U.S. Constitution. The center recently launched, in partnership with The Atlantic, a new project called “The Battle for the Constitution,” which Rosen will explore to open the week. Amidst our current political moment, and what Rosen has called the “Fourth Battle for the Constitution,” this project will cover issues from a constitutional rather than a political perspective — convening leading scholars and a diversity of voices to explore the issues and controversies surrounding America’s founding document. Rosen became president and CEO in 2013 and has developed the center’s acclaimed Interactive Constitution, an online resource which brings together the top conservative and liberal legal scholars in America to discuss areas of agreement and disagreement about every clause of the Constitution. Rosen is also a professor at The George Washington University Law School and a contributing editor of The Atlantic, whose essays and commentaries have appeared in the New York Times Magazine, on National Public Radio, in The New Republic, where he was the legal affairs editor, and The New Yorker, where he was a staff writer. Rosen is the author of six books including, most recently, a biography of William Howard Taft. His new book, Conversations with RBG: Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg on Life, Love, Liberty, and Law, will be published in November 2019. Rosen is a graduate of Harvard College; Oxford University, where he was a Marshall Scholar; and Yale Law School.
Interfaith Lecture Series; Fr. Richard Rohr    Hall of Philosophy
Fr. Richard Rohr moved Chautauqua audiences in droves during our 2019 season. The Franciscan mystic, theologian and movement-maker challenged us both as a chaplain of the week and in conversation each subsequent afternoon as part of our Interfaith Lecture Series. This year, we welcome Fr. Richard back during our week on “Reframing the Constitution” to more intentionally help citizens think about how they are reframing their own journey. Fr. Richard Rohr is a globally recognized ecumenical teacher whose work is grounded in Christian mysticism, practices of contemplation and self-emptying, and compassion for the marginalized. He is a Franciscan priest of the New Mexico province and founder of the Center for Action and Contemplation in Albuquerque, where he also serves as academic dean of the Living School for Action and Contemplation. Fr. Richard is the author of many books, including the bestsellers Falling Upward, The Divine Dance, Breathing Under Water, and, most recently,The Universal Christ. His work has been featured on Oprah’s SuperSoul Sunday, Krista Tippett’s On Being, and in the New York Times. As part of their City Makers: American Futures project in partnership with The Atlantic and Marketplace, the Fallowses visited smaller and medium-sized cities, meeting civic leaders, factory workers, recent immigrants, and young entrepreneurs to take the pulse and understand the prospects of places that usually draw notice only after a disaster or during a political campaign. The Fallowses’ book, Our Towns, is the story of their journey — and an account of a country busy remaking itself, despite the challenges and paralysis of national politics. London-based national correspondent James Fallows has written for The Atlantic since the late 1970s, living and reporting in Seattle, Berkeley, Austin, Tokyo, Kuala Lumpur, Shanghai, and Beijing. In addition to working for The Atlantic, he spent two years as chief White House speechwriter for Jimmy Carter and two years as the editor of US News & World Report. James Fallows has been a finalist for the National Magazine Award five times and has won once; he has also won the American Book Award for nonfiction and a N.Y. Emmy award for the documentary series “Doing Business in China.” He was the founding chairman of the New America Foundation. He is the author of numerous books, including Breaking the News: How the Media Undermines American Democracy and China Airborne; as well as Blind Into Baghdad and Postcards From Tomorrow Square, which are based on his writings for The Atlantic.
Morning Lecture: Martha S. Jones; Society of Black Alumni ..    Amphitheater
Martha S. Jones is the Society of Black Alumni Presidential Professor and Professor of History at The Johns Hopkins University, and a legal and cultural historian. In a week exploring how the history of the Constitution impacts contemporary American society, Jones will discuss the rare few times the Constitution has been amended, particularly in regards to the Fourteenth Amendment and birthright citizenship. Jones is the author of Birthright Citizens: A History of Race and Rights in Antebellum America and All Bound Up Together: The Woman Question in African American Public Culture 1830-1900, and a co-editor of Toward an Intellectual History of Black Women. Her latest, Vanguard: A History of African American Women’s Politics, is to be published in 2020 in conjunction with the 19th Amendment’s centennial. Jones has written for The Washington Post, The Atlantic, USA Today, Public Books, the Chronicle of Higher Education, and Time; the curatorship of museum exhibitions including “Reframing the Color Line” and “Proclaiming Emancipation” in conjunction with the William L. Clements Library; and collaborations with the Smithsonian’s National Portrait Gallery, the Charles Wright Museum of African American History, the Southern Poverty Law Center, PBS, Netflix, and Arte (France). Previously, Jones spent 16 years teaching history, law, and African American studies at the University of Michigan, where she was a Presidential Bicentennial Professor. Prior to her academic career, Jones was a public interest litigator in New York City, recognized for her work as a Charles H. Revson Fellow on the Future of the City of New York at Columbia University. She currently serves as a president of the Berkshire Conference of Women Historians, and on the Organization of American Historians Executive Board. Jones holds a Ph.D. in history from Columbia University and a J.D. from the CUNY School of Law.
Interfaith Lecture Series: Fr. Richard Rohr    Hall of Philosophy
Fr. Richard Rohr moved Chautauqua audiences in droves during our 2019 season. The Franciscan mystic, theologian and movement-maker challenged us both as a chaplain of the week and in conversation each subsequent afternoon as part of our Interfaith Lecture Series. This year, we welcome Fr. Richard back during our week on “Reframing the Constitution” to more intentionally help citizens think about how they are reframing their own journey. Fr. Richard Rohr is a globally recognized ecumenical teacher whose work is grounded in Christian mysticism, practices of contemplation and self-emptying, and compassion for the marginalized. He is a Franciscan priest of the New Mexico province and founder of the Center for Action and Contemplation in Albuquerque, where he also serves as academic dean of the Living School for Action and Contemplation. Fr. Richard is the author of many books, including the bestsellers Falling Upward, The Divine Dance, Breathing Under Water, and, most recently,The Universal Christ. His work has been featured on Oprah’s SuperSoul Sunday, Krista Tippett’s On Being, and in the New York Times. As part of their City Makers: American Futures project in partnership with The Atlantic and Marketplace, the Fallowses visited smaller and medium-sized cities, meeting civic leaders, factory workers, recent immigrants, and young entrepreneurs to take the pulse and understand the prospects of places that usually draw notice only after a disaster or during a political campaign. The Fallowses’ book, Our Towns, is the story of their journey — and an account of a country busy remaking itself, despite the challenges and paralysis of national politics. London-based national correspondent James Fallows has written for The Atlantic since the late 1970s, living and reporting in Seattle, Berkeley, Austin, Tokyo, Kuala Lumpur, Shanghai, and Beijing. In addition to working for The Atlantic, he spent two years as chief White House speechwriter for Jimmy Carter and two years as the editor of US News & World Report. James Fallows has been a finalist for the National Magazine Award five times and has won once; he has also won the American Book Award for nonfiction and a N.Y. Emmy award for the documentary series “Doing Business in China.” He was the founding chairman of the New America Foundation. He is the author of numerous books, including Breaking the News: How the Media Undermines American Democracy and China Airborne; as well as Blind Into Baghdad and Postcards From Tomorrow Square, which are based on his writings for The Atlantic.
Morning Lecture: Robert A. Levy; chairman, Cato Institute    Amphitheater
Robert A. Levy is chairman of the board of directors at the Cato Institute, a libertarian think tank in Washington, D.C., which he joined as senior fellow in constitutional studies in 1997 after 25 years in business. Levy brings his expertise to Chautauqua as he looks to the Founding Fathers and the intention of the Constitution as it was originally framed to strictly limit government, and argues how key Supreme Court decisions have eroded liberty. Levy serves as a director of the Institute for Justice and the Foundation for Government Accountability. He received his PhD in business from the American University in 1966, then founded CDA Investment Technologies, a major provider of investment information and software. At age 50, after leaving CDA in 1991, Levy went to George Mason University School of Law (now Antonin Scalia Law School), where he was chief articles editor of the law review and class valedictorian. He received his J.D. degree in 1994. The next two years he clerked for Judge Royce Lamberth on the US District Court and Judge Douglas Ginsburg on the U.S. Court of Appeals, both in Washington, D.C. For many years, Levy was an adjunct professor of law at Georgetown University. His writing has appeared in The New York Times, The Wall Street Journal, USA Today, The Washington Post, National Review, and numerous other publications. He has discussed public policy on national radio and TV programs, including ABC’s Nightline, Fox’s The O’Reilly Factor, PBS’s Newshour, and NBC’s Today Show. Levy’s latest book, co-authored with William Mellor, is The Dirty Dozen: How 12 Supreme Court Cases Radically Expanded Government and Eroded Freedom. Levy served as co-counsel in District of Columbia v. Heller, the successful Supreme Court challenge to Washington, D.C.’s gun ban.
Interfaith Lecture Series: Fr. Richard Rohr    Hall of Philosophy
Fr. Richard Rohr moved Chautauqua audiences in droves during our 2019 season. The Franciscan mystic, theologian and movement-maker challenged us both as a chaplain of the week and in conversation each subsequent afternoon as part of our Interfaith Lecture Series. This year, we welcome Fr. Richard back during our week on “Reframing the Constitution” to more intentionally help citizens think about how they are reframing their own journey. Fr. Richard Rohr is a globally recognized ecumenical teacher whose work is grounded in Christian mysticism, practices of contemplation and self-emptying, and compassion for the marginalized. He is a Franciscan priest of the New Mexico province and founder of the Center for Action and Contemplation in Albuquerque, where he also serves as academic dean of the Living School for Action and Contemplation. Fr. Richard is the author of many books, including the bestsellers Falling Upward, The Divine Dance, Breathing Under Water, and, most recently,The Universal Christ. His work has been featured on Oprah’s SuperSoul Sunday, Krista Tippett’s On Being, and in the New York Times. As part of their City Makers: American Futures project in partnership with The Atlantic and Marketplace, the Fallowses visited smaller and medium-sized cities, meeting civic leaders, factory workers, recent immigrants, and young entrepreneurs to take the pulse and understand the prospects of places that usually draw notice only after a disaster or during a political campaign. The Fallowses’ book, Our Towns, is the story of their journey — and an account of a country busy remaking itself, despite the challenges and paralysis of national politics. London-based national correspondent James Fallows has written for The Atlantic since the late 1970s, living and reporting in Seattle, Berkeley, Austin, Tokyo, Kuala Lumpur, Shanghai, and Beijing. In addition to working for The Atlantic, he spent two years as chief White House speechwriter for Jimmy Carter and two years as the editor of US News & World Report. James Fallows has been a finalist for the National Magazine Award five times and has won once; he has also won the American Book Award for nonfiction and a N.Y. Emmy award for the documentary series “Doing Business in China.” He was the founding chairman of the New America Foundation. He is the author of numerous books, including Breaking the News: How the Media Undermines American Democracy and China Airborne; as well as Blind Into Baghdad and Postcards From Tomorrow Square, which are based on his writings for The Atlantic.
Interfaith Lecture Series: Fr. Richard Rohr    Hall of Philosophy
Fr. Richard Rohr moved Chautauqua audiences in droves during our 2019 season. The Franciscan mystic, theologian and movement-maker challenged us both as a chaplain of the week and in conversation each subsequent afternoon as part of our Interfaith Lecture Series. This year, we welcome Fr. Richard back during our week on “Reframing the Constitution” to more intentionally help citizens think about how they are reframing their own journey. Fr. Richard Rohr is a globally recognized ecumenical teacher whose work is grounded in Christian mysticism, practices of contemplation and self-emptying, and compassion for the marginalized. He is a Franciscan priest of the New Mexico province and founder of the Center for Action and Contemplation in Albuquerque, where he also serves as academic dean of the Living School for Action and Contemplation. Fr. Richard is the author of many books, including the bestsellers Falling Upward, The Divine Dance, Breathing Under Water, and, most recently,The Universal Christ. His work has been featured on Oprah’s SuperSoul Sunday, Krista Tippett’s On Being, and in the New York Times. As part of their City Makers: American Futures project in partnership with The Atlantic and Marketplace, the Fallowses visited smaller and medium-sized cities, meeting civic leaders, factory workers, recent immigrants, and young entrepreneurs to take the pulse and understand the prospects of places that usually draw notice only after a disaster or during a political campaign. The Fallowses’ book, Our Towns, is the story of their journey — and an account of a country busy remaking itself, despite the challenges and paralysis of national politics. London-based national correspondent James Fallows has written for The Atlantic since the late 1970s, living and reporting in Seattle, Berkeley, Austin, Tokyo, Kuala Lumpur, Shanghai, and Beijing. In addition to working for The Atlantic, he spent two years as chief White House speechwriter for Jimmy Carter and two years as the editor of US News & World Report. James Fallows has been a finalist for the National Magazine Award five times and has won once; he has also won the American Book Award for nonfiction and a N.Y. Emmy award for the documentary series “Doing Business in China.” He was the founding chairman of the New America Foundation. He is the author of numerous books, including Breaking the News: How the Media Undermines American Democracy and China Airborne; as well as Blind Into Baghdad and Postcards From Tomorrow Square, which are based on his writings for The Atlantic.
Morning Lecture: Jon Meacham; historian, author,    Amphitheater
One of America’s most prominent public intellectuals, presidential historian and Pulitzer Prize-winning author Jon Meacham brings historical context to the issues and events impacting our daily lives. He will close the week by sharing his reflections on the lasting power of the Constitution, and the nation’s future. A contributing editor at Time, Meacham is the author of numerous books, a former executive editor and executive vice president at Random House, and served as Newsweek’s managing editor from 1998 to 2006 and editor from 2006 to 2010. His latest no. 1 New York Times bestseller, The Soul of America: The Battle for Our Better Angels, examines the present moment in American politics and life by looking back at critical times in U.S. history when hope overcame division and fear. Meacham is a co-author of the recently released book, Impeachment: An American History; his other books include Destiny and Power: The American Odyssey of George Herbert Walker Bush (Meacham delivered eulogies for both President George H.W. Bush and First Lady Barbara Bush); American Gospel: God, the Founding Fathers, and the Making of a Nation; and American Lion: Andrew Jackson in the White House, which won the Pulitzer Prize in 2009. His latest national bestseller is Songs of America: Patriotism, Protest, and the Music that Made a Nation. Meacham is a member of the Council on Foreign Relations, a fellow of the Society of American Historians, and chairs the National Advisory Board of the John C. Danforth Center on Religion and Politics at Washington University. He is a Distinguished Visiting Professor of History at The University of the South and a Visiting Distinguished Professor at Vanderbilt. Meacham is a graduate of The University of the South, where he earned his bachelor’s degree in English.
Interfaith Lecture Series: Rabbi Sid Schwarz    Hall of Philosophy
Rabbi Sid Schwarz is a social entrepreneur, author and teacher. He is currently a Senior Fellow at Hazon, a national organization based in New York. Rabbi Sid founded and led PANIM: The Institute for Jewish Leadership and Values for 21 years; its work centered on integrating Jewish learning, Jewish values and social responsibility. He is also the founding rabbi of Adat Shalom Reconstructionist Congregation in Bethesda, MD where he continues to teach and lead services. Dr. Schwarz holds a Ph.D. in Jewish history and is the author of two groundbreaking books--Finding a Spiritual Home: How a New Generation of Jews Can Transform the American Synagogue (Jewish Lights, 2000) and Judaism and Justice: The Jewish Passion to Repair the World (Jewish Lights, 2006). Rabbi Sid directs the Clergy Leadership Incubator (CLI), a program that trains rabbis to be visionary spiritual leaders. He also created and directs the Kenissa: Communities of Meaning Network, which is identifying, convening, and building the capacity of emerging new models of Jewish identity and community across the country. Rabbi Yitz Greenberg, founder of Clal and one of American Jewry’s most notable leaders, has written about Sid: “Rabbi Sid Schwarz’ life and career embody a unique mix of religious vision and an ability to implement that vision in the real world.” Sid was awarded the prestigious Covenant Award for his pioneering work in the field of Jewish education and was named by Newsweek as one of the 50 most influential rabbis in North America. Sid's most recent book is Jewish Megatrends: Charting the Course of the American Jewish Future (Jewish As part of their City Makers: American Futures project in partnership with The Atlantic and Marketplace, the Fallowses visited smaller and medium-sized cities, meeting civic leaders, factory workers, recent immigrants, and young entrepreneurs to take the pulse and understand the prospects of places that usually draw notice only after a disaster or during a political campaign. The Fallowses’ book, Our Towns, is the story of their journey — and an account of a country busy remaking itself, despite the challenges and paralysis of national politics. London-based national correspondent James Fallows has written for The Atlantic since the late 1970s, living and reporting in Seattle, Berkeley, Austin, Tokyo, Kuala Lumpur, Shanghai, and Beijing. In addition to working for The Atlantic, he spent two years as chief White House speechwriter for Jimmy Carter and two years as the editor of US News & World Report. James Fallows has been a finalist for the National Magazine Award five times and has won once; he has also won the American Book Award for nonfiction and a N.Y. Emmy award for the documentary series “Doing Business in China.” He was the founding chairman of the New America Foundation. He is the author of numerous books, including Breaking the News: How the Media Undermines American Democracy and China Airborne; as well as Blind Into Baghdad and Postcards From Tomorrow Square, which are based on his writings for The Atlantic.
Interfaith Lecture Series: Bishop Minerva G. Carcano    Hall of Philosophy
Bishop Minerva G. Carcaño is a third-generation Methodist. Active in the church all her life, Bishop Carcaño has served as a United Methodist leader on numerous boards, commissions, UM general conferences, committees and task forces. In the over 43 years since her ordination, she has served as a pastor, a chaplain, a lead organizer of an ecumenical parish, twice as a district superintendent in two different annual conferences, as a seminary program administrator and adjunct faculty member, and now as a bishop. Bishop Carcaño is currently a member of The California Endowment Board of Directors, the Council on Foreign Relations Religious Advisory Committee and the Southwest Industrial Education Fund Advisory Board of the IAF. She has served on the New Mexico Council of Churches, Ecumenical Ministries of Oregon, Arizona Ecumenical Council, and the Los Angeles Council of Religious Leaders. She is a recognized immigrant rights advocate and was a member of the founding class of the Auburn Senior Fellows. She has published articles on the rights of migrants in the Huffington Post and The Hill and has testified before the U.S. House of Representatives Judiciary Subcommittee on Immigration and Border Security. Carcaño has also long been an advocate for the full rights and inclusion of LGBTQIA+ persons joining her efforts to the work of such organizations as the Human Rights Campaign. She also collaborates with the work of the Children’s Defense Fund and has participated in leadership level dialogues around immigration and refugee concerns at the Center for American Progress and the Brookings Institution. As part of their City Makers: American Futures project in partnership with The Atlantic and Marketplace, the Fallowses visited smaller and medium-sized cities, meeting civic leaders, factory workers, recent immigrants, and young entrepreneurs to take the pulse and understand the prospects of places that usually draw notice only after a disaster or during a political campaign. The Fallowses’ book, Our Towns, is the story of their journey — and an account of a country busy remaking itself, despite the challenges and paralysis of national politics. London-based national correspondent James Fallows has written for The Atlantic since the late 1970s, living and reporting in Seattle, Berkeley, Austin, Tokyo, Kuala Lumpur, Shanghai, and Beijing. In addition to working for The Atlantic, he spent two years as chief White House speechwriter for Jimmy Carter and two years as the editor of US News & World Report. James Fallows has been a finalist for the National Magazine Award five times and has won once; he has also won the American Book Award for nonfiction and a N.Y. Emmy award for the documentary series “Doing Business in China.” He was the founding chairman of the New America Foundation. He is the author of numerous books, including Breaking the News: How the Media Undermines American Democracy and China Airborne; as well as Blind Into Baghdad and Postcards From Tomorrow Square, which are based on his writings for The Atlantic.
Morning Lecture: Fabrizio Hochschild; Under-Secretary-Gene..    Amphitheater
In his current role as Under-Secretary-General and Special Adviser to the Secretary-General, Fabrizio Hochschild is coordinating the preparation for the commemoration of the 75th anniversary of the United Nations in 2020 and related celebrations, through a system-wide process of consultations and reflections on the role of the United Nations in advancing international co-operation and in supporting Member States’ ability to respond to emerging challenges and frontier issues. He’ll discuss these efforts as part of Chautauqua’s week that, in part, honors the United Nation’s diamond anniversary. Prior to this appointment, Hochschild served as Assistant Secretary-General for Strategic Coordination in the Executive Office of the Secretary-General from 2017 to 2019. He has also served as Deputy Special Representative for the United Nations Multidimensional Integrated Stabilization Mission in the Central African Republic (MINUSCA) in 2016, UN Resident Coordinator, Humanitarian Coordinator and Resident Representative of the UN Development Programme (UNDP) in Colombia from 2013 to 2016, Director of the Field Personnel Division in the United Nations Department of Field Support, New York from 2010 to 2012; and as Chief of Field Operations and Technical Cooperation in the Office of the High Commissioner for Human Rights (OHCHR), Geneva from 2005 to 2009. Hochschild began his United Nations career in 1988 with the Office of the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees (UNHCR) in Sudan and served in subsequent postings with UNHCR, the United Nations Relief and Works Agency for Palestinian Refugees (UNRWA), the Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs (OCHA) and in peacekeeping. He was posted in Sudan, Jerusalem, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Geneva, New York, Timor-Leste, Serbia and the United Republic of Tanzania. Hochschild is a graduate of the University of Oxford.
Interfaith Lecture Series: Rev. Dr. Mitri Raheb    Hall of Philosophy
Rev. Dr. Mitri Raheb is Co-Founder of Bright Stars of Bethlehem and President of Dar al-Kalima University College of Arts and Culture in Bethlehem, Palestine. Born in Bethlehem, Rev. Dr. Mitri Raheb has long had a vision that his fellow Palestinians would not only survive but thrive. He sees creativity and, specifically, creative resistance as key to self-determination and hope. As such, Dr. Raheb has established numerous educational and cultural initiatives in Palestine, most notably Dar al-Kalima University of Arts and Culture in Bethlehem, where he is the President. During his time as Senior Pastor of Christmas Lutheran Church in Bethlehem from 1987-2017, Rev. Dr. Raheb was the most widely published Palestinian theologian to date, with 17 books including, ?The Cross in Contexts: Suffering and Redemption in Palestine, and ?Faith in the Face of Empire: The Bible through Palestinian Eyes. Dr. Raheb is the recipient of numerous international awards, including the Olof Palme Prize (2015) for peace and the German Media Prize (2012) for his local, regional, and international efforts to end the occupation in Palestine and to work towards a peaceful, equitable society for all in the Middle East. Other recipients of these awards include former ?President Barack Obama, the ?Dalai Lama, and UN Secretary General Kofi Annan. Skilled in over seven languages, Rev. Dr. Raheb is a sought-after voice regarding Palestine, its people, and Middle East diplomacy. He has been widely featured on international media outlets including CBS, CNN, ABC, BBC, PBS, The Economist, Washington Post, Boston Globe, Newsweek, and 60 minutes. Dr. Raheb holds a Doctorate in Theology from Philipps University of Marburg, Germany. As part of their City Makers: American Futures project in partnership with The Atlantic and Marketplace, the Fallowses visited smaller and medium-sized cities, meeting civic leaders, factory workers, recent immigrants, and young entrepreneurs to take the pulse and understand the prospects of places that usually draw notice only after a disaster or during a political campaign. The Fallowses’ book, Our Towns, is the story of their journey — and an account of a country busy remaking itself, despite the challenges and paralysis of national politics. London-based national correspondent James Fallows has written for The Atlantic since the late 1970s, living and reporting in Seattle, Berkeley, Austin, Tokyo, Kuala Lumpur, Shanghai, and Beijing. In addition to working for The Atlantic, he spent two years as chief White House speechwriter for Jimmy Carter and two years as the editor of US News & World Report. James Fallows has been a finalist for the National Magazine Award five times and has won once; he has also won the American Book Award for nonfiction and a N.Y. Emmy award for the documentary series “Doing Business in China.” He was the founding chairman of the New America Foundation. He is the author of numerous books, including Breaking the News: How the Media Undermines American Democracy and China Airborne; as well as Blind Into Baghdad and Postcards From Tomorrow Square, which are based on his writings for The Atlantic.
Morning Lecture: Rachel Bowen Pittman; Executive Director,..    Amphitheater
Throughout her career, Rachel Bowen Pittman has been committed to the idea that individuals, when brought together and motivated around a common vision, can be strong catalysts for change toward a brighter, more just, and more sustainable future — work she’ll discuss as part of a week of forward-looking action to address the world’s challenges. As Executive Director of the United Nations Association of the United States of America (UNA-USA), Pittman leads a grassroots advocacy movement of more than 20,000 Americans in 225+ chapters who are dedicated to supporting the work of the United Nations in their communities, on campuses, and on Capitol Hill. Pittman guides the UNA-USA’s strategic work and key partnerships, oversees membership expansion, and spearheads important advocacy initiatives to help the United States advance the far-reaching goals of the United Nations. She has been with the UNA-USA — a component of the United Nations Foundation — for more than four years. As Senior Director of Membership and Programs, she managed the UNA-USA’s national programs and events, including the annual Global Engagement Summit at UN Headquarters, Global Leadership Summit in Washington, D.C., and UN Day events across the United States. She also led a successful nationwide fundraising campaign to provide education to youth in refugee camps around the world. Previously, Pittman served on the leadership teams of several professional associations representing lawyers, surgeons, regulators, and engineers. In those positions, she strengthened membership programs, directed rebranding initiatives, and secured agreements with national associations representing China, Korea, Argentina, India, Peru, Egypt and Mexico. She holds a B.S.B.A in international business from American University and an MBA in marketing from Johns Hopkins University.
Interfaith Lecture Series; Jeremy Ben-Ami    Hall of Philosophy
Jeremy Ben-Ami is the President of J Street, bringing to the organization deep experience in American politics, a strong belief in the power of diplomacy and a passionate commitment to the state of Israel. In this role, he has been at the center of the evolving debate around Israel and US foreign policy in Washington and in the American Jewish community. As a leading national commentator on US foreign policy and the Israeli-Palestinian conflict, Ben-Ami has been profiled in The New York Times, Washington Post and CQ. His writing has been published in The New York Times, Washington Post, Los Angeles Times, New Republic, Politico, The Guardian and many other outlets. Ben-Ami appeared as a guest on CNN, MSNBC and the Colbert Report, and has headlined lectures, debates and public discussions in communities across the United States. Ben-Ami was one of the leading advocates in the successful campaign to secure congressional approval for the Iran nuclear agreement. He consults regularly with leading policymakers, officials and experts on foreign policy, national security and the US-Israel relationship. A veteran political staffer, he served in the White House in the mid-1990s as an adviser to President Bill Clinton. He has worked on seven Presidential and numerous state and local campaigns, serving as Howard Dean’s National Policy Director in 2004 and co-managing a New York City mayoral campaign in 2001. Ben-Ami received a law degree from New York University and is a graduate of the Woodrow Wilson School of Public and International Relations at Princeton University. He lives in the suburbs of Washington DC with his wife and their two children. As part of their City Makers: American Futures project in partnership with The Atlantic and Marketplace, the Fallowses visited smaller and medium-sized cities, meeting civic leaders, factory workers, recent immigrants, and young entrepreneurs to take the pulse and understand the prospects of places that usually draw notice only after a disaster or during a political campaign. The Fallowses’ book, Our Towns, is the story of their journey — and an account of a country busy remaking itself, despite the challenges and paralysis of national politics. London-based national correspondent James Fallows has written for The Atlantic since the late 1970s, living and reporting in Seattle, Berkeley, Austin, Tokyo, Kuala Lumpur, Shanghai, and Beijing. In addition to working for The Atlantic, he spent two years as chief White House speechwriter for Jimmy Carter and two years as the editor of US News & World Report. James Fallows has been a finalist for the National Magazine Award five times and has won once; he has also won the American Book Award for nonfiction and a N.Y. Emmy award for the documentary series “Doing Business in China.” He was the founding chairman of the New America Foundation. He is the author of numerous books, including Breaking the News: How the Media Undermines American Democracy and China Airborne; as well as Blind Into Baghdad and Postcards From Tomorrow Square, which are based on his writings for The Atlantic.
Interfaith Lecture Series: Dr. Robert J. Wicks    Hall of Philosophy
For over thirty-five years, Dr. Robert J. Wicks, has been called upon to speak calm into chaos by individuals and groups experiencing great stress, anxiety, and confusion. Holder of a doctorate in Psychology (Psy.D.) from Hahnemann Medical College and Hospital, he is Professor Emeritus at Loyola University Maryland, has taught in universities and professional schools of psychology, medicine, nursing, theology, education, business, and social work, and has been honored as the Commencement Speaker for Wright State School of Medicine in Dayton, Ohio, and was both Visiting Scholar and Commencement Speaker at Stritch School of Medicine in Chicago. He is the recipient of honorary doctorates from Georgian Court University, Caldwell College, and Marywood University. Over the past several years he has spoken on his major areas of expertise—resilience, self-care, maintaining a healthy perspective and the prevention of secondary stress (the pressures encountered in reaching out to others) on Capitol Hill to Members of Congress and their Chiefs of Staff, at Johns Hopkins School of Medicine, the U.S. Air Force Academy, the Mayo Clinic, the North American Aerospace Defense Command, and the Defense Intelligence Agency, as well as at Boston’s Children’s Hospital, Harvard Divinity School, Yale School of Nursing, Princeton Theological Seminary, and to members of the NATO Intelligence Fusion Center in England. He has spoken at the Boston Public Library’s commemoration of the Boston Marathon bombing, addressed 10,000 educators in the Air Canada Arena in Toronto, and was the opening keynote speaker to 1,500 physicians for the American Medical Directors Association. He has also spoken at the FBI and New York City Police Academies, led a course on resilience in Beirut for caregivers from Aleppo, Syria, and addressed helping professionals in China, Vietnam, India, Thailand, Haiti, Northern Ireland, Scotland, Hungary, Guatemala, Malta, New Zealand, Australia, France, England, and South Africa. He was responsible for the psychological debriefing of NGOs/relief workers evacuated from Rwanda during their genocide, and worked in Cambodia with professionals from the English-speaking community who were present to help the Khmer people rebuild their nation following years of terror and torture. In 2006, he also delivered presentations on self-care at the National Naval Medical Center in Bethesda Maryland and Walter Reed Army Hospital to those health care professionals responsible for Iraq and Afghan war veterans evacuated to the U. S. with multiple amputations and severe head injuries. More recently, during the Ebola crisis, he addressed U.S. Army health care professionals returning from helping in Africa. Author of over 50 books for both professionals and the general public, including the bestselling Riding the Dragon, among his latest books for the general public are: The Tao of Ordinariness: Humility and Simplicity in a Narcissistic Age; Perspective: The Calm within the Storm; and Bounce: Living the Resilient Life. In 2006, Dr. Wicks received the first annual Alumni Award for Excellence in Professional Psychology from Widener University and is the recipient of the Humanitarian of the Year Award from the American Counseling Association’s Division on Spirituality, Ethics, and Religious Values in Counseling. In the military, he was as an officer in the U.S. Marine Corps. As part of their City Makers: American Futures project in partnership with The Atlantic and Marketplace, the Fallowses visited smaller and medium-sized cities, meeting civic leaders, factory workers, recent immigrants, and young entrepreneurs to take the pulse and understand the prospects of places that usually draw notice only after a disaster or during a political campaign. The Fallowses’ book, Our Towns, is the story of their journey — and an account of a country busy remaking itself, despite the challenges and paralysis of national politics. London-based national correspondent James Fallows has written for The Atlantic since the late 1970s, living and reporting in Seattle, Berkeley, Austin, Tokyo, Kuala Lumpur, Shanghai, and Beijing. In addition to working for The Atlantic, he spent two years as chief White House speechwriter for Jimmy Carter and two years as the editor of US News & World Report. James Fallows has been a finalist for the National Magazine Award five times and has won once; he has also won the American Book Award for nonfiction and a N.Y. Emmy award for the documentary series “Doing Business in China.” He was the founding chairman of the New America Foundation. He is the author of numerous books, including Breaking the News: How the Media Undermines American Democracy and China Airborne; as well as Blind Into Baghdad and Postcards From Tomorrow Square, which are based on his writings for The Atlantic.
Interfaith Lecture Series: Dr. Satpal Singh    Hall of Philosophy
Dr. Satpal Singh is a Professor at the State University of New York at Buffalo. He received a Ph.D. in Molecular Biology from the Tata Institute of Fundamental Research in Mumbai, India, and received further training in Germany and the US. His current research focuses on suppressing neurodegeneration in animal models of Alzheimer’s disease, Parkinson’s disease and other neurodegenerative disorders. He has founded and directs an annual summer-long research program at the University of Cambridge, UK. Having narrowly survived an anti-Sikh pogrom in India, he focuses on bringing peace and harmony to a world torn by hate and violence perpetrated in the name of religion, race, gender, and other divisions in society. He is a Founding Trustee of the Sikh Council for Interfaith Relations, and a former Chairperson of the World Sikh Council - America Region. He is a member of the Executive Council of Religions for Peace, USA, and is on the Religious Leaders Circle of the Multi-faith Alliance for Syrian Refugees. Dr. Singh often participates in interfaith dialogues on diversity, religion, and peace, and is one of the main organizers of retreats between Sikhs and Catholics, and between Sikhs and the National Council of Churches. He has represented the Sikh faith in many forums, including delivering a prayer on peace and harmony along with Pope Francis at the 9/11 Memorial in NY City, and organizing Sikh participation in the Parliament of the World’s Religions in Salt Lake City in 2015 and in Toronto in 2018. He has presented the Sikh perspective in gatherings, and on television and radio programs, in the US, Canada, UK, Ukraine, New Zealand, and India, and has been featured in Spotlights on religious leaders by the Council on Foreign Relations. Dr. Singh is active in the area of social justice, and has written opinion pieces in The Washington Post, The Huffington Post, The Interfaith Observer, PBS Newshour, and other print media. In particular, he advocates for complete equality among women and men. He is on the Board of Directors of the Family Justice Center in Buffalo, NY; holds forums on the issue of violence against women; and has organized national and international panel discussions on the issue, particularly on what leaders of faith can do to address it. As part of their City Makers: American Futures project in partnership with The Atlantic and Marketplace, the Fallowses visited smaller and medium-sized cities, meeting civic leaders, factory workers, recent immigrants, and young entrepreneurs to take the pulse and understand the prospects of places that usually draw notice only after a disaster or during a political campaign. The Fallowses’ book, Our Towns, is the story of their journey — and an account of a country busy remaking itself, despite the challenges and paralysis of national politics. London-based national correspondent James Fallows has written for The Atlantic since the late 1970s, living and reporting in Seattle, Berkeley, Austin, Tokyo, Kuala Lumpur, Shanghai, and Beijing. In addition to working for The Atlantic, he spent two years as chief White House speechwriter for Jimmy Carter and two years as the editor of US News & World Report. James Fallows has been a finalist for the National Magazine Award five times and has won once; he has also won the American Book Award for nonfiction and a N.Y. Emmy award for the documentary series “Doing Business in China.” He was the founding chairman of the New America Foundation. He is the author of numerous books, including Breaking the News: How the Media Undermines American Democracy and China Airborne; as well as Blind Into Baghdad and Postcards From Tomorrow Square, which are based on his writings for The Atlantic.

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