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The CLSC has been a leader in adult education, community reading, and literary engagement for nearly 150 years. Each summer, the CLSC adds at least nine more exceptional books to our Historic Booklist of more than 800 selections—and the authors visit Chautauqua to present their works. Readers can become members of the CLSC Class of 2018 and the Alumni Association by reading any 12 books from the Historic Booklist.

The CLSC also presents a Young Readers program, with weekly activities and discussions of children’s and young adult literature. For CLSC and Young Readers Program information visit CLSC.chq.org.

Purchasing your CLSC and Young Readers books online from our Bookstore directly supports our programs! Visit Bookstore.chq.org (http://www.chautauquabookstore.com/)
2019 Themes and Programming
Review the themes and programming for the 2019 Summer Assembly Season at Chautauqua here www.chq.org/2019 or click on the "INFO" button below. It won't be Chautauqua without you.

Join Giving Clubs at Chautauqua!
Your gate pass helps to cover only a portion of the expense of operating Chautauqua Institution and offering the world-class programs and experiences you love. There are many levels of giving that will benefit Chautauqua. Please consider supporting the Institution according to your means and comfort level. We are deeply grateful for all donations. Benefactor Club $25,000 Patron Club $10,000 Sponsor Club $5,000 President's Club $3,500 The 1874 Society $1,874 to $3499 Community Support Levels of $1,000+, $500+, $125+, and up to $125 https://giving.chq.org/
Morning Lecture: Dan Egan, author,   Amphitheater
Dan Egan The Death and Life of the Great Lakes 10:45 a.m. Tuesday, June 25, 2019 - Amphitheater For thousands of years the pristine Great Lakes were separated from the Atlantic Ocean by the roaring Niagara Falls and from the Mississippi River basin by a “sub-continental divide.” Beginning in the late 1800s, these barriers were circumvented to attract freighters from the Atlantic and to allow Chicago’s sewage to float out to the Mississippi. These were engineering marvels in their time?and the changes in Chicago arrested a deadly cycle of waterborne illnesses?but they have had horrendous unforeseen consequences. In an age when dire problems like the Flint water crisis or the California drought bring ever more attention to the indispensability of safe, clean, easily available water, Dan Egan’s The Death and the Life of the Great Lakes is a powerful paean to what is arguably our most precious resource, an urgent examination of what threatens it and a convincing call to arms about the relatively simple things we need to do to protect it. Dan Egan is a reporter at the Milwaukee Journal Sentinel and the Brico Fund Senior Water Policy Fellow in Great Lakes Journalism at the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee's School of Freshwater Sciences’ Center for Water Policy. The author of The Death and Life of the Great Lakes, he has twice been a finalist for the Pulitzer Prize, and he has won the Alfred I. duPont–Columbia University Award, John B. Oakes Award, AAAS Kavli Science Journalism Award, and J. Anthony Lukas Work-in-Progress Award. A native of Green Bay, Wisconsin, he grew to love Lake Michigan by spending summer weekends and vacations on the Door Peninsula, where both sets of his grandparents had summer homes. After graduating from the University of Michigan with a degree in history in 1989, Egan moved out West and worked as an assistant park historian at Yellowstone National Park. In 1992 he began his newspaper career at the Idaho Mountain Express in Sun Valley Idaho. From there he moved on to newspapers in Idaho Falls, Idaho and Salt Lake City, Utah. During his decade out West, Egan covered a range of environmental issues, including efforts to restore threatened and endangered species like wolves, salmon and grizzly bears. He also covered the Alpine skiing for the Salt Lake Tribune during the 2002 Winter Games. Egan is a graduate of the University of Michigan and the Columbia School of Journalism.
CLSC Author Presentation: Elizabeth Rush,   Hall of Philosophy
With every passing day, and every record-breaking hurricane, it grows clearer that climate change is neither imagined nor distant?and that rising seas are transforming the coastline of the United States in irrevocable ways. In Rising, Elizabeth Rush guides readers through places where this change has been most dramatic, from the Gulf Coast to Miami, and from New York City to the Bay Area. For many of the plants, animals, and humans in these places, the options are stark: retreat or perish in place. Weaving firsthand testimonials from those facing this choice?a Staten Islander who lost her father during Sandy, the remaining holdouts of a Native American community on a drowning Isle de Jean Charles, a neighborhood in Pensacola settled by escaped slaves hundreds of years ago?with profiles of wildlife biologists, activists, and other members of these vulnerable communities, Rising privileges the voices of those too often kept at the margins. Elizabeth Rush is also the author of Still Lifes from a Vanishing City: Essays and Photographs from Yangon, Myanmar. Her work explores how humans adapt to changes enacted upon them by forces seemingly beyond their control, from ecological transformation to political revolution. Her writing has appeared or is forthcoming in The New York Times, The Guardian, Harpers, Guernica, Granta, Orion, Creative Nonfiction, The Washington Post, Le Monde Diplomatique and The New Republic, among others.
CLSC Author Presentation: Sarah Ruhl,   Hall of Philosophy
In 2012, Sarah Ruhl was a distinguished author and playwright, twice a finalist for the Pulitzer Prize. Max Ritvo, a student in her playwriting class at Yale University, was an exuberant, opinionated, and highly gifted poet. He was also in remission from pediatric cancer. Over the next four years?in which Ritvo’s illness returned and his health declined, even as his productivity bloomed?the two exchanged letters that spark with urgency, humor, and the desire for connection. Reincarnation, books, the afterlife as an Amtrak quiet car, good soup: in Ruhl and Ritvo’s exchanges, all ideas are fair, nourishing game, shared and debated in a spirit of generosity and love. Studded with poems and songs, Letters from Max is a deeply moving portrait of a friendship, and a shimmering exploration of love, art, mortality, and the afterlife. Sarah Ruhl is a playwright, two-time Pulitzer Prize finalist, Tony Award nominee, and author of the book 100 Essays I Don’t Have Time to Write, which was a New York Times Notable Book of the Year. She has been the recipient of many awards, including the MacArthur Fellowship and the Whiting Writers’ Award. She is currently on the faculty of the Yale School of Drama and lives in Brooklyn with her family. Max Ritvo (1990–2016) was the author, with Sarah Ruhl, of Letters from Max. He was also the author of two collections of poems, Four Reincarnations and The Final Voicemails, which were published by Milkweed Editions in 2016 and 2018. His chapbook, Aeons, was chosen by Jean Valentine to receive the Poetry Society of America Chapbook Fellowship in 2014. Ritvo’s poetry has also appeared in The New Yorker and Poetry, among many other publications.
CLSC Author Presentation: Kanishk Tharoor,   Hall of Philosophy
In one of this collection’s singularly imaginative stories, despondent diplomats entertain themselves by playing table tennis in zero gravity?for after rising seas destroy Manhattan, the United Nations moves to an orbiting space hotel. In other tales, a team of anthropologists treks to a remote village to record a language’s last surviving speaker intoning her native tongue; and Genghis Khan’s marauding army steadily approaches an unnamed city’s walls. With exuberant originality and startling vision, Tharoor cuts against the grain of literary convention, drawing equally from ancient history and current events. His world-spanning stories speak to contemporary challenges of environmental collapse and cultural appropriation, but also to the workings of legend and their timeless human truths. Whether refashioning the romances of Alexander the Great or confronting the plight of today’s refugees, Tharoor writes with distinctive insight and remarkable assurance. Swimmer Among the Stars announces the arrival of a vital, enchanting talent. Kanishk Tharoor’s journalism and fiction have been published in The New York Times, The Guardian, The Atlantic, The Nation, The Paris Review, and The New Yorker, and his work has been nominated for the National Magazine Award. He is the presenter and writer of the BBC radio series "Museum of Lost Objects" and a columnist for the Hindustan Times and the Hindu Business Line in India. He lives in Brooklyn with his wife and son.
CLSC Author Presentation: Joy Harjo,   Hall of Philosophy
A musical, magical, resilient volume from one of our most celebrated and essential Native American voices: In these poems, the joys and struggles of the everyday are played against the grinding politics of being human. Beginning in a hotel room in the dark of a distant city, we travel through history and follow the memory of the Trail of Tears from the bend in the Tallapoosa River to a place near the Arkansas River. Stomp dance songs, blues, and jazz ballads echo throughout. Lost ancestors are recalled. Resilient songs are born, even as they grieve the loss of their country. Called a "magician and a master" (San Francisco Chronicle), Joy Harjo is at the top of her form in Conflict Resolution for Holy Beings. Joy Harjo’s eight books of poetry include How We Became Human: New and Selected Poems and She Had Some Horses, and her memoir Crazy Brave won the American Book Award, among other honors. She is the recipient of the Poetry Foundation’s Ruth Lilly Prize for Lifetime Achievement and the Wallace Stevens Award from the Academy of American Poets for proven mastery in the art of poetry. A renowned musician, Harjo performs with her saxophone internationally. The stunning second novel from National Book Award finalist Andrew Krivák is a heartbreaking, captivating story about a family awaiting the return of their youngest son from the Vietnam War. In a small town in Pennsylvania’s Endless Mountains Hannah and her son Bo mourn the loss of the family patriarch, Jozef Vinich. They were three generations under one roof. Three generations, but only one branch of a scraggy tree; they are a war-haunted family in a war-torn century, from World War I through the Vietnam War, where Hannah’s prodigal younger son, Sam, has been reported missing in action. Bo is left to grieve but also to hope for reunion, to create a new life, to embrace the land and work its soil through the seasons. The Signal Flame is a stirring novel about generations of men and women and the events that define them, brothers who take different paths, the old European values yielding to new world ways, and the convalescence of memory and war. Andrew Krivák’s first novel, The Sojourn, was a finalist for the National Book Award, and received the Dayton Literary Peace Prize for fiction and the inaugural Chautauqua Prize in 2012. He is also the author of a memoir about his time in the Jesuit order, A Long Retreat: In Search of a Religious Life, and editor of The Letters of William Carlos Williams to Edgar Irving Williams, 1902-1912.

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