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2019 Themes and Programming
Review the themes and programming for the 2019 Summer Assembly Season at Chautauqua here www.chq.org/2019 or click on the "INFO" button below. It won't be Chautauqua without you.

Judy Collins and Madeleine Peyroux    Amphitheater
Opening night 2019 will feature a double bill evening of singer-songwriters that will delight and inspire: Born in Athens, Georgia and often found in her adopted home of Paris, singer-songwriter Madeleine Peyroux has become one of the most acclaimed jazz singers of her generation. Eight albums and 22 years since her debut with Dreamland, Peyroux continues to challenge the confines of jazz, venturing into the fertile fields of contemporary music with unfading curiosity. She has remained one of the most respected jazz artists of the modern age, as celebrated for her diverse set of covers as for her own songwriting skills, as exemplified in her new album Anthem. "The album is a finely polished production, each performance in crisp servitude to the song. Occasional sonic curveballs, such as sound effects, add a playfulness that keeps listeners on their toes." —DownBeat http://madeleinepeyroux.com/ https://youtu.be/WKB8t8rPw9Y/ Judy Collins has inspired audiences with sublime vocals and boldly vulnerable songwriting for over five decades, and her luminescent presence shines brightly as new generations bask in the glow of her iconic 50-album body of work. Having garnered several top-ten hits and gold and platinum selling albums, Collins’ stunning rendition of Joni Mitchell's “Both Sides Now” from her landmark 1967 album, Wildflowers, has been entered into the Grammy Hall of Fame. Prolific as ever, Ms. Collins released a collaborative and Grammy-nominated album in June 2016, Silver Skies Blue. She continues to create music of hope and healing that lights up the world and speaks to the heart. Judy Collins will be the closing half of Chautauqua Institution's 2019 opening night — an iconic artist for an iconic Amphitheater. http://www.judycollins.com/ https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MqpmqcKrC7M&feature=youtu.be
Morning Devotional: Rabbi Sharon Brous    Amphitheater
Rabbi Sharon Brous is a leading voice in reanimating religious life in America, working to develop a spiritual roadmap for soulful, multi-faith justice work in Los Angeles and around the country. She is the senior and founding rabbi of IKAR, which was started in 2004 and has become a model for Jewish revitalization in the US and beyond. With the goal of reinvigorating Jewish practice and inspiring people of faith to reclaim a moral and prophetic voice, IKAR quickly became one of the fastest growing and most influential Jewish congregations in the country. Today it is credited with sparking a rethinking of religious life in a time of unprecedented disaffection and declining affiliation. Brous’s 2016 TED talk, “Reclaiming Religion,” has been viewed by more than 1.3 million people and translated into 20 languages. In 2013, she blessed President Obama and Vice President Biden at the Inaugural National Prayer Service, and Mayor Eric Garcetti at his inauguration in LA in 2017. She spoke at the Women’s March in Washington, DC in 2017, and at the national launch of the Poor People’s Campaign and the opening of the National Memorial for Peace and Justice in 2018. Brous was named #1 on the Newsweek/The Daily Beast list of the most influential Rabbis in America, and has been recognized by The Forwardand the Jerusalem Post as one of the fifty most influential Jews. She was featured on the cover of TIME magazine in 2018 based on Norman Rockwell’s Four Freedoms. Brous is in the inaugural cohort of Auburn Seminary's Senior Fellows program, which unites top faith leaders working on the frontlines for justice. Brous also sits on Mayor’s Interfaith Collective and on the faculty of the Shalom Hartman Institute-North America and REBOOT, and serves on the International Council of the New Israel Fund and the national steering committee for the Poor People’s Campaign. Rabbi Brous is a graduate of Columbia University, was ordained by the Jewish Theological Seminary, and lives in Los Angeles with her husband and three children.
Morning Lecture: Annie Griffiths, photojournalist    Amphitheater
One of the first women photographers to work for National Geographic, Annie Griffiths has photographed in nearly 150 countries during her illustrious career, and has experienced first-hand how photographs can bear witness to history and serve as catalysts for change. ?She has worked on dozens of magazine and book projects for National Geographic, including stories on Lawrence of Arabia, Baja California, Galilee, Petra, Sydney, New Zealand, and Jerusalem. In addition to her magazine work, Griffiths is deeply committed to photographing for aid organizations around the world.?She is the founder and executive director of Ripple Effect Images, a collective of photographers who document the programs that are empowering women and girls in the developing world.?In less than five years, Ripple’s work has helped 24 nonprofits raise over a million dollars. Griffiths’ work has also appeared in LIFE, Geo, Smithsonian, Fortune, Stern, and many other publications. Along with author Barbara Kingsolver, she produced?Last Stand: America’s Virgin Lands, a book celebrating the last pristine wilderness in North America.?Griffiths is also the author of A Camera, Two Kids and a Camel and Simply Beautiful Photographs, which was named the top photo/art book of the year by both Amazon and Barnes and Noble.? She is currently at work on two new books. Griffiths is a fellow with The International League of Conservation Photographers and has received awards from the National Press Photographers Association, Heifer International, the National Organization of Women, The University of Minnesota and the White House News Photographers Association.
Morning Devotional: Rabbi Sharon Brous    Amphitheater
Rabbi Sharon Brous is a leading voice in reanimating religious life in America, working to develop a spiritual roadmap for soulful, multi-faith justice work in Los Angeles and around the country. She is the senior and founding rabbi of IKAR, which was started in 2004 and has become a model for Jewish revitalization in the US and beyond. With the goal of reinvigorating Jewish practice and inspiring people of faith to reclaim a moral and prophetic voice, IKAR quickly became one of the fastest growing and most influential Jewish congregations in the country. Today it is credited with sparking a rethinking of religious life in a time of unprecedented disaffection and declining affiliation. Brous’s 2016 TED talk, “Reclaiming Religion,” has been viewed by more than 1.3 million people and translated into 20 languages. In 2013, she blessed President Obama and Vice President Biden at the Inaugural National Prayer Service, and Mayor Eric Garcetti at his inauguration in LA in 2017. She spoke at the Women’s March in Washington, DC in 2017, and at the national launch of the Poor People’s Campaign and the opening of the National Memorial for Peace and Justice in 2018. Brous was named #1 on the Newsweek/The Daily Beast list of the most influential Rabbis in America, and has been recognized by The Forwardand the Jerusalem Post as one of the fifty most influential Jews. She was featured on the cover of TIME magazine in 2018 based on Norman Rockwell’s Four Freedoms. Brous is in the inaugural cohort of Auburn Seminary's Senior Fellows program, which unites top faith leaders working on the frontlines for justice. Brous also sits on Mayor’s Interfaith Collective and on the faculty of the Shalom Hartman Institute-North America and REBOOT, and serves on the International Council of the New Israel Fund and the national steering committee for the Poor People’s Campaign. Rabbi Brous is a graduate of Columbia University, was ordained by the Jewish Theological Seminary, and lives in Los Angeles with her husband and three children.
Morning Lecture: Nikole Hannah-Jones, reporter,   Amphitheater
MacArthur Genius Grant Fellow Nikole Hannah-Jones covers racial injustice for The New York Times Magazine, and has spent years chronicling the way official policy has created — and maintains — racial segregation in housing and schools. She has written extensively on the history of racism — from 1619 and the first recorded slave ship arriving in the Americas to the present day — as well as school resegregation, and the decades-long failure of the federal government to enforce the landmark 1968 Fair Housing Act. Her piece “Worlds Apart” in The New York Times Magazine won the National Magazine Award for “journalism that illuminates issues of national importance” as well as the Hillman Prize for Magazine Journalism. In 2016, she was awarded a Peabody Award and George Polk Award for radio reporting for her “This American Life” story, “The Problem We All Live With.” She was named Journalist of the Year by the National Association of Black Journalists, and was also named to The Root 100. Her reporting has also won Deadline Club Awards, Online Journalism Awards, the Sigma Delta Chi Award for Public Service, the Fred M. Hechinger Grand Prize for Distinguished Education Reporting, the Emerson College President’s Award for Civic Leadership, and was a previous finalist for the National Magazine Award. Additionally, Hannah-Jones co-founded the Ida B. Wells Society for Investigative Reporting with the goal of increasing the number of reporters and editors of color. She holds a Master of Arts in Mass Communication from the University of North Carolina and earned her BA in History and African-American studies from the University of Notre Dame.
Morning Devotional: Rabbi Sharon Brous    Amphitheater
Rabbi Sharon Brous is a leading voice in reanimating religious life in America, working to develop a spiritual roadmap for soulful, multi-faith justice work in Los Angeles and around the country. She is the senior and founding rabbi of IKAR, which was started in 2004 and has become a model for Jewish revitalization in the US and beyond. With the goal of reinvigorating Jewish practice and inspiring people of faith to reclaim a moral and prophetic voice, IKAR quickly became one of the fastest growing and most influential Jewish congregations in the country. Today it is credited with sparking a rethinking of religious life in a time of unprecedented disaffection and declining affiliation. Brous’s 2016 TED talk, “Reclaiming Religion,” has been viewed by more than 1.3 million people and translated into 20 languages. In 2013, she blessed President Obama and Vice President Biden at the Inaugural National Prayer Service, and Mayor Eric Garcetti at his inauguration in LA in 2017. She spoke at the Women’s March in Washington, DC in 2017, and at the national launch of the Poor People’s Campaign and the opening of the National Memorial for Peace and Justice in 2018. Brous was named #1 on the Newsweek/The Daily Beast list of the most influential Rabbis in America, and has been recognized by The Forwardand the Jerusalem Post as one of the fifty most influential Jews. She was featured on the cover of TIME magazine in 2018 based on Norman Rockwell’s Four Freedoms. Brous is in the inaugural cohort of Auburn Seminary's Senior Fellows program, which unites top faith leaders working on the frontlines for justice. Brous also sits on Mayor’s Interfaith Collective and on the faculty of the Shalom Hartman Institute-North America and REBOOT, and serves on the International Council of the New Israel Fund and the national steering committee for the Poor People’s Campaign. Rabbi Brous is a graduate of Columbia University, was ordained by the Jewish Theological Seminary, and lives in Los Angeles with her husband and three children.
Morning Lecture: Dan Egan, author,   Amphitheater
Dan Egan The Death and Life of the Great Lakes 10:45 a.m. Tuesday, June 25, 2019 - Amphitheater For thousands of years the pristine Great Lakes were separated from the Atlantic Ocean by the roaring Niagara Falls and from the Mississippi River basin by a “sub-continental divide.” Beginning in the late 1800s, these barriers were circumvented to attract freighters from the Atlantic and to allow Chicago’s sewage to float out to the Mississippi. These were engineering marvels in their time?and the changes in Chicago arrested a deadly cycle of waterborne illnesses?but they have had horrendous unforeseen consequences. In an age when dire problems like the Flint water crisis or the California drought bring ever more attention to the indispensability of safe, clean, easily available water, Dan Egan’s The Death and the Life of the Great Lakes is a powerful paean to what is arguably our most precious resource, an urgent examination of what threatens it and a convincing call to arms about the relatively simple things we need to do to protect it. Dan Egan is a reporter at the Milwaukee Journal Sentinel and the Brico Fund Senior Water Policy Fellow in Great Lakes Journalism at the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee's School of Freshwater Sciences’ Center for Water Policy. The author of The Death and Life of the Great Lakes, he has twice been a finalist for the Pulitzer Prize, and he has won the Alfred I. duPont–Columbia University Award, John B. Oakes Award, AAAS Kavli Science Journalism Award, and J. Anthony Lukas Work-in-Progress Award. A native of Green Bay, Wisconsin, he grew to love Lake Michigan by spending summer weekends and vacations on the Door Peninsula, where both sets of his grandparents had summer homes. After graduating from the University of Michigan with a degree in history in 1989, Egan moved out West and worked as an assistant park historian at Yellowstone National Park. In 1992 he began his newspaper career at the Idaho Mountain Express in Sun Valley Idaho. From there he moved on to newspapers in Idaho Falls, Idaho and Salt Lake City, Utah. During his decade out West, Egan covered a range of environmental issues, including efforts to restore threatened and endangered species like wolves, salmon and grizzly bears. He also covered the Alpine skiing for the Salt Lake Tribune during the 2002 Winter Games. Egan is a graduate of the University of Michigan and the Columbia School of Journalism.
Morning Devotional: Rabbi Sharon Brous    Amphitheater
Rabbi Sharon Brous is a leading voice in reanimating religious life in America, working to develop a spiritual roadmap for soulful, multi-faith justice work in Los Angeles and around the country. She is the senior and founding rabbi of IKAR, which was started in 2004 and has become a model for Jewish revitalization in the US and beyond. With the goal of reinvigorating Jewish practice and inspiring people of faith to reclaim a moral and prophetic voice, IKAR quickly became one of the fastest growing and most influential Jewish congregations in the country. Today it is credited with sparking a rethinking of religious life in a time of unprecedented disaffection and declining affiliation. Brous’s 2016 TED talk, “Reclaiming Religion,” has been viewed by more than 1.3 million people and translated into 20 languages. In 2013, she blessed President Obama and Vice President Biden at the Inaugural National Prayer Service, and Mayor Eric Garcetti at his inauguration in LA in 2017. She spoke at the Women’s March in Washington, DC in 2017, and at the national launch of the Poor People’s Campaign and the opening of the National Memorial for Peace and Justice in 2018. Brous was named #1 on the Newsweek/The Daily Beast list of the most influential Rabbis in America, and has been recognized by The Forwardand the Jerusalem Post as one of the fifty most influential Jews. She was featured on the cover of TIME magazine in 2018 based on Norman Rockwell’s Four Freedoms. Brous is in the inaugural cohort of Auburn Seminary's Senior Fellows program, which unites top faith leaders working on the frontlines for justice. Brous also sits on Mayor’s Interfaith Collective and on the faculty of the Shalom Hartman Institute-North America and REBOOT, and serves on the International Council of the New Israel Fund and the national steering committee for the Poor People’s Campaign. Rabbi Brous is a graduate of Columbia University, was ordained by the Jewish Theological Seminary, and lives in Los Angeles with her husband and three children.
Morning Lecture: Hugh Hewitt, host, "The Hugh Hewitt Show"    Amphitheater
Hugh Hewitt Host, “The Hugh Hewitt Show” Political analyst and contributor, NBC News and MSNBC 10:45 a.m. Thursday, June 27, 2019 Hugh Hewitt is the acclaimed host of “The Hugh Hewitt Show” on the Salem Radio Network, heard nationally every weekday morning; an NBC News and MSNBC political analyst; a professor of law at Chapman University Fowler School of Law; and a contributing columnist for The Washington Post. Hewitt began his career as a research assistant for David Eisenhower; he then joined the staff of former President Richard Nixon as an editorial assistant. Hewitt left Nixon’s staff to attend law school, then clerked on the U.S. Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia Circuit for Judges Roger Robb and George MacKinnon. He served as special assistant to Attorneys General William Smith and Edwin Meese, assistant counsel in the White House and as general counsel to two federal agencies before ending his time in the Reagan Administration as deputy director of the Office of Personnel Management. Hewitt returned to California at Nixon’s request to oversee the construction and opening of the Nixon Library and Birthplace in Yorba Linda, California. His broadcast career began in 1990 on Los Angeles radio station KFI AM 640 and on television in 1992 as host of PBS LA affiliate KCET nightly news and public affairs program “Life & Times Tonight,” for which he received three Emmy Awards. He is the author of a dozen books including his memoir The Happiest Life, and prior to joining NBC in the spring of 2016 was a regular on all networks’ Sunday shows. Since leaving the federal government, Hewitt has served as Governor Pete Wilson’s appointee to the South Coast Air Quality Management District, as the Speaker of the California Assembly’s appointee on the California Arts Council, and as a member of the Orange County Children & Families Commission. Hewitt is a graduate of Harvard College and the University of Michigan Law School.
Morning Devotional: Rabbi Sharon Brous    Amphitheater
Rabbi Sharon Brous is a leading voice in reanimating religious life in America, working to develop a spiritual roadmap for soulful, multi-faith justice work in Los Angeles and around the country. She is the senior and founding rabbi of IKAR, which was started in 2004 and has become a model for Jewish revitalization in the US and beyond. With the goal of reinvigorating Jewish practice and inspiring people of faith to reclaim a moral and prophetic voice, IKAR quickly became one of the fastest growing and most influential Jewish congregations in the country. Today it is credited with sparking a rethinking of religious life in a time of unprecedented disaffection and declining affiliation. Brous’s 2016 TED talk, “Reclaiming Religion,” has been viewed by more than 1.3 million people and translated into 20 languages. In 2013, she blessed President Obama and Vice President Biden at the Inaugural National Prayer Service, and Mayor Eric Garcetti at his inauguration in LA in 2017. She spoke at the Women’s March in Washington, DC in 2017, and at the national launch of the Poor People’s Campaign and the opening of the National Memorial for Peace and Justice in 2018. Brous was named #1 on the Newsweek/The Daily Beast list of the most influential Rabbis in America, and has been recognized by The Forwardand the Jerusalem Post as one of the fifty most influential Jews. She was featured on the cover of TIME magazine in 2018 based on Norman Rockwell’s Four Freedoms. Brous is in the inaugural cohort of Auburn Seminary's Senior Fellows program, which unites top faith leaders working on the frontlines for justice. Brous also sits on Mayor’s Interfaith Collective and on the faculty of the Shalom Hartman Institute-North America and REBOOT, and serves on the International Council of the New Israel Fund and the national steering committee for the Poor People’s Campaign. Rabbi Brous is a graduate of Columbia University, was ordained by the Jewish Theological Seminary, and lives in Los Angeles with her husband and three children.
Morning Lecture: William J. Burns; president, Carnegie End..    Amphitheater
William J. Burns is president of the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace, the oldest international affairs think tank in the United States. Burns retired from the U.S. Foreign Service in 2014 after a 33-year diplomatic career. He holds the highest rank in the Foreign Service, career ambassador, and is only the second serving career diplomat in history to become deputy secretary of state. He is the author of The Back Channel: A Memoir of American Diplomacy and the Case for Its Renewal. Prior to his tenure as deputy secretary, Burns served from 2008 to 2011 as under secretary for political affairs. He was ambassador to Russia from 2005 to 2008, assistant secretary of state for Near Eastern affairs from 2001 to 2005, and ambassador to Jordan from 1998 to 2001. His other posts in the Foreign Service include: executive secretary of the State Department and special assistant to former secretaries of state Warren Christopher and Madeleine Albright; and minister-counselor for political affairs at the U.S. embassy in Moscow; among other posts. Burns has been the recipient of three Presidential Distinguished Service Awards and numerous Department of State awards, including three Secretary’s Distinguished Service Awards, two Distinguished Honor Awards, the 2006 Charles E. Cobb, Jr. Ambassadorial Award for Initiative and Success in Trade Development, and the 2005 Robert C. Frasure Memorial Award for Conflict Resolution and Peacemaking. Burns earned a bachelor’s in history from LaSalle University and master’s and doctoral degrees in international relations from Oxford University, where he studied as a Marshall Scholar.
Morning Devotional: Rev. Zina Jacque    Amphitheater
Zina Jacque is the Lead Pastor at the Community Church of Barrington in Illinois. She has served on the staffs of multicultural, urban, and suburban churches, and has done extensive work in the areas of education, counseling, and support programs. Jacque was the founder and first Executive Director of the Pastoral Counseling Center of Trinity Church (Episcopal) in Boston. In this role she implemented training on mental health issues for local pastors and led the Center in the delivery of direct service hours to economically disenfranchised people across greater Boston. The center is now in its 18th year and remains a unique center serving the greater Boston area. Previously Jacque served as the Protestant Chaplin at Bentley College, and as the Executive Director of the Boston Ten Point Coalition, where she served as a key member of the Boston program of violence reduction: Operation Ceasefire. Prior to entering ministry Rev. Jacque completed a 20+ year career in higher education serving in senior positions at Northwestern, the University of Chicago, Mills College (Oakland, CA), and the University of California (both Santa Cruz and the Office of the President). Jacque holds a Ph.D. in Theology (Practical Theology) and a Masters of Divinity degree (Summa Cum Laude) from Boston University, an M.A. from Columbia University, and a B.A. from Northwestern University. She has served as an adjunct professor of Pastoral Care at the University of Chicago and Boston University. She serves on the boards of the American Baptist Churches USA (Board of General Ministries), Journey Care Hospice and Palliative Care Center, National Senior Campuses, Samaritan Counseling Center of Northwest Illinois, and the Barrington Area Ministerial Alliance, among others. But what is most important to her is this, she is a child of God, formed and filled with God’s love. She believes we are each sent into the world to live out our gifts and talents for the good of the whole, and that, as Christians, we are meant to be the channel through which all of the families of the earth are blessed.
Morning Lecture: John Kasich, Former governor, State of Ohio    Amphitheater
Two-term former Ohio Governor John R. Kasich is a newly named CNN political commentator who believes in the power of individuals to effect change at the local level, and that we need to reach beyond politics and the issues that divide us to achieve solutions through unity and resilience. As governor, Kasich closed an $8 billion budget shortfall without a tax increase, reduced taxes by $5 billion and outpaced the nation’s job growth with 557,600 new jobs in Ohio. Under his tenure, Ohio budget reserves grew from 89 cents to $2.7 billion. The governor was a leading voice in promoting bipartisan solutions to health care reform, immigration and international trade, and has been one of the few Republicans to advocate for Medicaid’s expansion. After having become the youngest state senator in Ohio history, Kasich was elected to the U.S. House and served as a member of Congress for 18 years. He went on to become the chairman of the House Budget Committee and balanced the federal budget four times. After leaving Congress in 2000, Kasich worked as a managing director in the Investment Banking Division of Lehman Brothers, and hosted “Heartland with John Kasich,” on the Fox News Channel, in addition to being a stand-in host for both Bill O’Reilly and Chris Matthews. He is the author of four New York Times best-sellers including, most recently, Two Paths: America Divided or United. Kasich is a graduate of The Ohio State University, where he also served as a Presidential Fellow.
Morning Devotional: Rev. Zina Jacque    Amphitheater
Zina Jacque is the Lead Pastor at the Community Church of Barrington in Illinois. She has served on the staffs of multicultural, urban, and suburban churches, and has done extensive work in the areas of education, counseling, and support programs. Jacque was the founder and first Executive Director of the Pastoral Counseling Center of Trinity Church (Episcopal) in Boston. In this role she implemented training on mental health issues for local pastors and led the Center in the delivery of direct service hours to economically disenfranchised people across greater Boston. The center is now in its 18th year and remains a unique center serving the greater Boston area. Previously Jacque served as the Protestant Chaplin at Bentley College, and as the Executive Director of the Boston Ten Point Coalition, where she served as a key member of the Boston program of violence reduction: Operation Ceasefire. Prior to entering ministry Rev. Jacque completed a 20+ year career in higher education serving in senior positions at Northwestern, the University of Chicago, Mills College (Oakland, CA), and the University of California (both Santa Cruz and the Office of the President). Jacque holds a Ph.D. in Theology (Practical Theology) and a Masters of Divinity degree (Summa Cum Laude) from Boston University, an M.A. from Columbia University, and a B.A. from Northwestern University. She has served as an adjunct professor of Pastoral Care at the University of Chicago and Boston University. She serves on the boards of the American Baptist Churches USA (Board of General Ministries), Journey Care Hospice and Palliative Care Center, National Senior Campuses, Samaritan Counseling Center of Northwest Illinois, and the Barrington Area Ministerial Alliance, among others. But what is most important to her is this, she is a child of God, formed and filled with God’s love. She believes we are each sent into the world to live out our gifts and talents for the good of the whole, and that, as Christians, we are meant to be the channel through which all of the families of the earth are blessed.
Morning Devotional: Rev. Zina Jacque    Amphitheater
Zina Jacque is the Lead Pastor at the Community Church of Barrington in Illinois. She has served on the staffs of multicultural, urban, and suburban churches, and has done extensive work in the areas of education, counseling, and support programs. Jacque was the founder and first Executive Director of the Pastoral Counseling Center of Trinity Church (Episcopal) in Boston. In this role she implemented training on mental health issues for local pastors and led the Center in the delivery of direct service hours to economically disenfranchised people across greater Boston. The center is now in its 18th year and remains a unique center serving the greater Boston area. Previously Jacque served as the Protestant Chaplin at Bentley College, and as the Executive Director of the Boston Ten Point Coalition, where she served as a key member of the Boston program of violence reduction: Operation Ceasefire. Prior to entering ministry Rev. Jacque completed a 20+ year career in higher education serving in senior positions at Northwestern, the University of Chicago, Mills College (Oakland, CA), and the University of California (both Santa Cruz and the Office of the President). Jacque holds a Ph.D. in Theology (Practical Theology) and a Masters of Divinity degree (Summa Cum Laude) from Boston University, an M.A. from Columbia University, and a B.A. from Northwestern University. She has served as an adjunct professor of Pastoral Care at the University of Chicago and Boston University. She serves on the boards of the American Baptist Churches USA (Board of General Ministries), Journey Care Hospice and Palliative Care Center, National Senior Campuses, Samaritan Counseling Center of Northwest Illinois, and the Barrington Area Ministerial Alliance, among others. But what is most important to her is this, she is a child of God, formed and filled with God’s love. She believes we are each sent into the world to live out our gifts and talents for the good of the whole, and that, as Christians, we are meant to be the channel through which all of the families of the earth are blessed.
Morning Devotional: Rev. Zina Jacque    Amphitheater
Zina Jacque is the Lead Pastor at the Community Church of Barrington in Illinois. She has served on the staffs of multicultural, urban, and suburban churches, and has done extensive work in the areas of education, counseling, and support programs. Jacque was the founder and first Executive Director of the Pastoral Counseling Center of Trinity Church (Episcopal) in Boston. In this role she implemented training on mental health issues for local pastors and led the Center in the delivery of direct service hours to economically disenfranchised people across greater Boston. The center is now in its 18th year and remains a unique center serving the greater Boston area. Previously Jacque served as the Protestant Chaplin at Bentley College, and as the Executive Director of the Boston Ten Point Coalition, where she served as a key member of the Boston program of violence reduction: Operation Ceasefire. Prior to entering ministry Rev. Jacque completed a 20+ year career in higher education serving in senior positions at Northwestern, the University of Chicago, Mills College (Oakland, CA), and the University of California (both Santa Cruz and the Office of the President). Jacque holds a Ph.D. in Theology (Practical Theology) and a Masters of Divinity degree (Summa Cum Laude) from Boston University, an M.A. from Columbia University, and a B.A. from Northwestern University. She has served as an adjunct professor of Pastoral Care at the University of Chicago and Boston University. She serves on the boards of the American Baptist Churches USA (Board of General Ministries), Journey Care Hospice and Palliative Care Center, National Senior Campuses, Samaritan Counseling Center of Northwest Illinois, and the Barrington Area Ministerial Alliance, among others. But what is most important to her is this, she is a child of God, formed and filled with God’s love. She believes we are each sent into the world to live out our gifts and talents for the good of the whole, and that, as Christians, we are meant to be the channel through which all of the families of the earth are blessed.
Morning Lecture: Risa Goluboff, dean, University of Virgin..    Amphitheater
Risa Goluboff is the 12th, and the first female, dean of the University of Virginia School of Law. She is a nationally renowned legal historian whose scholarship and teaching focuses on American constitutional and civil rights law, and especially their historical development in the 20th century. After the white supremacist violence in Charlottesville in the summer of 2017, Goluboff led the University-wide committee charged with recovering from and responding to the events. Goluboff is the author of The Lost Promise of Civil Rights and Vagrant Nation: Police Power, Constitutional Change, and the Making of the 1960s, which both received numerous honors. A member of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences and the American Law Institute, Goluboff received the University of Virginia School of Law’s Carl McFarland Award for excellence in faculty scholarship in 2008, and the University of Virginia's All-University Teaching Award in 2011. She also holds appointments as Professor of History in the Corcoran Department of History, Faculty Affiliate at the Carter G. Woodson Institute for African-American and African Studies, and Faculty Senior Fellow at the Miller Center. Prior to joining the Law School in 2002, Goluboff clerked for Judge Guido Calabresi of the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Second Circuit and Justice Stephen Breyer of the U.S. Supreme Court. She holds degrees from Harvard (A.B.), Princeton (M.A., Ph.D.), and Yale (J.D.) and served as a Fulbright Scholar to South Africa.
Morning Devotional: Rev. Zina Jacque    Amphitheater
Zina Jacque is the Lead Pastor at the Community Church of Barrington in Illinois. She has served on the staffs of multicultural, urban, and suburban churches, and has done extensive work in the areas of education, counseling, and support programs. Jacque was the founder and first Executive Director of the Pastoral Counseling Center of Trinity Church (Episcopal) in Boston. In this role she implemented training on mental health issues for local pastors and led the Center in the delivery of direct service hours to economically disenfranchised people across greater Boston. The center is now in its 18th year and remains a unique center serving the greater Boston area. Previously Jacque served as the Protestant Chaplin at Bentley College, and as the Executive Director of the Boston Ten Point Coalition, where she served as a key member of the Boston program of violence reduction: Operation Ceasefire. Prior to entering ministry Rev. Jacque completed a 20+ year career in higher education serving in senior positions at Northwestern, the University of Chicago, Mills College (Oakland, CA), and the University of California (both Santa Cruz and the Office of the President). Jacque holds a Ph.D. in Theology (Practical Theology) and a Masters of Divinity degree (Summa Cum Laude) from Boston University, an M.A. from Columbia University, and a B.A. from Northwestern University. She has served as an adjunct professor of Pastoral Care at the University of Chicago and Boston University. She serves on the boards of the American Baptist Churches USA (Board of General Ministries), Journey Care Hospice and Palliative Care Center, National Senior Campuses, Samaritan Counseling Center of Northwest Illinois, and the Barrington Area Ministerial Alliance, among others. But what is most important to her is this, she is a child of God, formed and filled with God’s love. She believes we are each sent into the world to live out our gifts and talents for the good of the whole, and that, as Christians, we are meant to be the channel through which all of the families of the earth are blessed.
Morning Devotional: Rev. David Anderson    Amphitheater
Dr. David Anderson, founder and President of the BridgeLeader Network (BLN), is one of the world’s leading authorities on building bridges across the deep divides of race, faith, culture, and wealth. His global work has brought hope and healing to communities, families, and people in Africa, Asia, Europe, the Middle East and North America including work in Ferguson, Missouri, and Baltimore, Maryland, during recent civil unrest around issues of race and police brutality. Wherever there is a divide, Anderson seeks to build a bridge through relevant and intelligent conversation. His insight, vision, and passion have made him a widely sought speaker, writer, and consultant for major national and international events and policy initiatives. He has appeared on ABC, CNN, FOX, BET, TBN and C-SPAN television networks, and has been interviewed on more than 2,000 radio stations worldwide. Anderson is the bridge-building voice in the Nation's Capital as host of the daily radio talk show "Real Talk with Dr. David Anderson" on WAVA (105.1 FM) – the most listened to Christian talk station on the East Coast and the 2nd most listened to Christian talk station in the nation. Dr. Anderson also hosted “Real Talk with Dr. David Anderson” on ABC2 in Baltimore, Maryland, for 4 seasons. Dr. Anderson earned his Doctor of Philosophy degree in 2001 from Oxford Graduate School's American Centre for Religion and Society Studies in the US, while studying and defending his essays at Oxford University in England. Dr. Anderson currently serves as the Chancellor of Omega Graduate School (formerly Oxford Graduate School). As the founder and senior pastor of Bridgeway Community Church located in Columbia, Maryland, Dr. Anderson reaches a dynamic, multicultural congregation of over 5,000 weekly attendees from more than 52 different nations, and their services are viewed online in over 100 countries. Dr. Anderson is the author of several books on race and diversity, including Letters across the Divide and Multicultural Ministry, the award-winning Gracism: The Art of Inclusion, and I Forgrace You: Doing Good to Those Who Have Hurt You. In 2010, Dr. Anderson edited and co-authored the acclaimed Multicultural Ministry Handbook: Creatively Connecting to a Diverse World. His newest book, How to Think like a Gracist, along with all of Dr. Anderson's resources, are available at EmbraceGracism.com. You can learn more about Dr. Anderson and his work at AndersonSpeaks.com. Dr. Anderson and his family reside in Ellicott City, Maryland.
Morning Lecture: Corey Jaskolski; conservationist, engineer    Amphitheater
Corey Jaskolski is an inventor, engineer, National Geographic Fellow, photographer, AR and VR developer, and an explorer who specializes in creating technologies for some of the most challenging environments on Earth. Early in his career, he founded Hydro Technologies, an engineering company that specialized in building sensing and imaging solutions for the world’s toughest environments. At Hydro Technologies, his clients included DARPA, NASA, half a dozen departments in the U.S. Navy, and the U.S, Special Forces (SOCOM). Jaskolski has developed a suite of exploration technologies including archaeology search drones, robotic underwater camera systems, color night vision platforms, 3D scanning camera traps, and underwater laser scanners. His technical imaging and scanning work has taken him to some of the world's most sacred and beautiful places including dives in the frigid waters of Antarctica for VR capture, 3D scanning in the Tomb of Jesus, working 12,500 feet deep in a three-man submersible on the wreck of the Titanic, spherical image capture inside Tut’s tomb, aerial LIDAR scanning of Chichen Itza, VR capture in some of Italy’s most iconic cathedrals, and deep into underwater caves containing Mayan human sacrifice victims for 3D scanning. Jaskolski is co-founder of Virtual Wonders, a company focused on protecting and sharing the world’s special places through 3D scanning. Jaskolski’s work often appears in National Geographic Magazine’ on PBS and the National Geographic Channels; and in numerous scientific journals and other publications. He serves as a member of the board of directors at the Milwaukee Public Museum. Jaskolski has degrees in physics, mathematics, electrical engineering and computer science from Massachusetts Institute of Technology.
Morning Devotional: Rev. David Anderson    Amphitheater
Dr. David Anderson, founder and President of the BridgeLeader Network (BLN), is one of the world’s leading authorities on building bridges across the deep divides of race, faith, culture, and wealth. His global work has brought hope and healing to communities, families, and people in Africa, Asia, Europe, the Middle East and North America including work in Ferguson, Missouri, and Baltimore, Maryland, during recent civil unrest around issues of race and police brutality. Wherever there is a divide, Anderson seeks to build a bridge through relevant and intelligent conversation. His insight, vision, and passion have made him a widely sought speaker, writer, and consultant for major national and international events and policy initiatives. He has appeared on ABC, CNN, FOX, BET, TBN and C-SPAN television networks, and has been interviewed on more than 2,000 radio stations worldwide. Anderson is the bridge-building voice in the Nation's Capital as host of the daily radio talk show "Real Talk with Dr. David Anderson" on WAVA (105.1 FM) – the most listened to Christian talk station on the East Coast and the 2nd most listened to Christian talk station in the nation. Dr. Anderson also hosted “Real Talk with Dr. David Anderson” on ABC2 in Baltimore, Maryland, for 4 seasons. Dr. Anderson earned his Doctor of Philosophy degree in 2001 from Oxford Graduate School's American Centre for Religion and Society Studies in the US, while studying and defending his essays at Oxford University in England. Dr. Anderson currently serves as the Chancellor of Omega Graduate School (formerly Oxford Graduate School). As the founder and senior pastor of Bridgeway Community Church located in Columbia, Maryland, Dr. Anderson reaches a dynamic, multicultural congregation of over 5,000 weekly attendees from more than 52 different nations, and their services are viewed online in over 100 countries. Dr. Anderson is the author of several books on race and diversity, including Letters across the Divide and Multicultural Ministry, the award-winning Gracism: The Art of Inclusion, and I Forgrace You: Doing Good to Those Who Have Hurt You. In 2010, Dr. Anderson edited and co-authored the acclaimed Multicultural Ministry Handbook: Creatively Connecting to a Diverse World. His newest book, How to Think like a Gracist, along with all of Dr. Anderson's resources, are available at EmbraceGracism.com. You can learn more about Dr. Anderson and his work at AndersonSpeaks.com. Dr. Anderson and his family reside in Ellicott City, Maryland.
Morning Lecture: Steve Winter, wildlife photographer    Amphitheater
Wildlife photographer Steve Winter has spent over 20 years leading photographic expeditions to remote locations around the world on a mission to document big cats. Winter’s dedication to the protection of these iconic animals on the brink of extinction in the wild is evident throughout his career where he has served as an ambassador for the the wildlife he photographs. He has also been a champion of the Big Cats Initiative, a long-term commitment by National Geographic Society to fund on-the-ground research and innovative conservation projects to protect big cats and their critical habitats. A former photojournalist with the Black Star Photo Agency, Winter began shooting for National Geographic in 1991. He has covered many subjects for National Geographic Magazine, including the natural history of Cuba, Russia’s giant Kamchatka bears, Myanmar’s Irrawaddy River, snow leopards, cougars, Kaziranga National Park, tigers and leopards. Winter has been named BBC Wildlife Photographer of the Year and BBC Wildlife Photojournalist of the Year. He won first prize in the nature story category from World Press Photo in 2014 and 2008. He twice was awarded the Global Vision Award from Pictures of the Year International from University of Missouri. He has appeared on CBS Nightly News, 60 Minutes, NPR, the BBC, and other media outlets, and has filmed numerous shows for National Geographic Channel and Nat Geo Wild. Winter speaks all over the world for Nat Geo Live on his “On the Trail of Big Cats” presentation. In November 2013, National Geographic published Winter’s photography book, Tigers Forever: Saving the World’s Most Endangered Cat. Winter is a graduate of the Academy of Art and the University of San Francisco.
Morning Devotional: Rev. David Anderson    Amphitheater
Dr. David Anderson, founder and President of the BridgeLeader Network (BLN), is one of the world’s leading authorities on building bridges across the deep divides of race, faith, culture, and wealth. His global work has brought hope and healing to communities, families, and people in Africa, Asia, Europe, the Middle East and North America including work in Ferguson, Missouri, and Baltimore, Maryland, during recent civil unrest around issues of race and police brutality. Wherever there is a divide, Anderson seeks to build a bridge through relevant and intelligent conversation. His insight, vision, and passion have made him a widely sought speaker, writer, and consultant for major national and international events and policy initiatives. He has appeared on ABC, CNN, FOX, BET, TBN and C-SPAN television networks, and has been interviewed on more than 2,000 radio stations worldwide. Anderson is the bridge-building voice in the Nation's Capital as host of the daily radio talk show "Real Talk with Dr. David Anderson" on WAVA (105.1 FM) – the most listened to Christian talk station on the East Coast and the 2nd most listened to Christian talk station in the nation. Dr. Anderson also hosted “Real Talk with Dr. David Anderson” on ABC2 in Baltimore, Maryland, for 4 seasons. Dr. Anderson earned his Doctor of Philosophy degree in 2001 from Oxford Graduate School's American Centre for Religion and Society Studies in the US, while studying and defending his essays at Oxford University in England. Dr. Anderson currently serves as the Chancellor of Omega Graduate School (formerly Oxford Graduate School). As the founder and senior pastor of Bridgeway Community Church located in Columbia, Maryland, Dr. Anderson reaches a dynamic, multicultural congregation of over 5,000 weekly attendees from more than 52 different nations, and their services are viewed online in over 100 countries. Dr. Anderson is the author of several books on race and diversity, including Letters across the Divide and Multicultural Ministry, the award-winning Gracism: The Art of Inclusion, and I Forgrace You: Doing Good to Those Who Have Hurt You. In 2010, Dr. Anderson edited and co-authored the acclaimed Multicultural Ministry Handbook: Creatively Connecting to a Diverse World. His newest book, How to Think like a Gracist, along with all of Dr. Anderson's resources, are available at EmbraceGracism.com. You can learn more about Dr. Anderson and his work at AndersonSpeaks.com. Dr. Anderson and his family reside in Ellicott City, Maryland.
Morning Lecture: Rae Wynn-Grant; Conservation scientist, l..    Amphitheater
Rae Wynn-Grant is a conservation scientist, large-carnivore ecologist, nature storyteller, and advocate with expertise in using emerging technology to identify how humans are changing the way carnivores use landscapes. She is currently studying the ecological and social drivers of human-carnivore conflict and how human development can either facilitate or disrupt connectivity of carnivore habitat. She is carrying out this work in the Great Plains of northeast Montana where she is studying potential habitat corridors that can aid in grizzly bear conservation. She has worked on similar research with black bears in the Western Great Basin and African lions in rural Kenya and Tanzania, and grizzly bears in the Greater Yellowstone Ecosystem. Wynn-Grant is also a 2018 fellow with National Geographic Society working on carnivore conservation in partnership with the American Prairie Reserve. Additionally, she is the Equity, Inclusion, and Diversity Officer on the Board of Governors for the Society for Conservation Biology, focusing on providing the tools and strategies needed for embracing and advancing issues related to equitable opportunity and representation in conservation biology. She serves on the Board of Directors for The Explorer's Club, and the Board of Advisors for University of Florida's Doris Duke Conservation Scholars Program. Wynn-Grant maintains a Visiting Scientist position at the American Museum of Natural History, and adjunct faculty positions at Columbia University and Johns Hopkins University. She received her Bachelor of Science from Emory University, her master’s from Yale University, and her doctorate from Columbia University. She completed a Conservation Science Research and Teaching Postdoctoral fellowship with the Center for Biodiversity and Conservation at the American Museum of Natural History.
Morning Devotional: Rev. David Anderson    Amphitheater
Dr. David Anderson, founder and President of the BridgeLeader Network (BLN), is one of the world’s leading authorities on building bridges across the deep divides of race, faith, culture, and wealth. His global work has brought hope and healing to communities, families, and people in Africa, Asia, Europe, the Middle East and North America including work in Ferguson, Missouri, and Baltimore, Maryland, during recent civil unrest around issues of race and police brutality. Wherever there is a divide, Anderson seeks to build a bridge through relevant and intelligent conversation. His insight, vision, and passion have made him a widely sought speaker, writer, and consultant for major national and international events and policy initiatives. He has appeared on ABC, CNN, FOX, BET, TBN and C-SPAN television networks, and has been interviewed on more than 2,000 radio stations worldwide. Anderson is the bridge-building voice in the Nation's Capital as host of the daily radio talk show "Real Talk with Dr. David Anderson" on WAVA (105.1 FM) – the most listened to Christian talk station on the East Coast and the 2nd most listened to Christian talk station in the nation. Dr. Anderson also hosted “Real Talk with Dr. David Anderson” on ABC2 in Baltimore, Maryland, for 4 seasons. Dr. Anderson earned his Doctor of Philosophy degree in 2001 from Oxford Graduate School's American Centre for Religion and Society Studies in the US, while studying and defending his essays at Oxford University in England. Dr. Anderson currently serves as the Chancellor of Omega Graduate School (formerly Oxford Graduate School). As the founder and senior pastor of Bridgeway Community Church located in Columbia, Maryland, Dr. Anderson reaches a dynamic, multicultural congregation of over 5,000 weekly attendees from more than 52 different nations, and their services are viewed online in over 100 countries. Dr. Anderson is the author of several books on race and diversity, including Letters across the Divide and Multicultural Ministry, the award-winning Gracism: The Art of Inclusion, and I Forgrace You: Doing Good to Those Who Have Hurt You. In 2010, Dr. Anderson edited and co-authored the acclaimed Multicultural Ministry Handbook: Creatively Connecting to a Diverse World. His newest book, How to Think like a Gracist, along with all of Dr. Anderson's resources, are available at EmbraceGracism.com. You can learn more about Dr. Anderson and his work at AndersonSpeaks.com. Dr. Anderson and his family reside in Ellicott City, Maryland.
Morning Devotional: Rev. David Anderson    Amphitheater
Dr. David Anderson, founder and President of the BridgeLeader Network (BLN), is one of the world’s leading authorities on building bridges across the deep divides of race, faith, culture, and wealth. His global work has brought hope and healing to communities, families, and people in Africa, Asia, Europe, the Middle East and North America including work in Ferguson, Missouri, and Baltimore, Maryland, during recent civil unrest around issues of race and police brutality. Wherever there is a divide, Anderson seeks to build a bridge through relevant and intelligent conversation. His insight, vision, and passion have made him a widely sought speaker, writer, and consultant for major national and international events and policy initiatives. He has appeared on ABC, CNN, FOX, BET, TBN and C-SPAN television networks, and has been interviewed on more than 2,000 radio stations worldwide. Anderson is the bridge-building voice in the Nation's Capital as host of the daily radio talk show "Real Talk with Dr. David Anderson" on WAVA (105.1 FM) – the most listened to Christian talk station on the East Coast and the 2nd most listened to Christian talk station in the nation. Dr. Anderson also hosted “Real Talk with Dr. David Anderson” on ABC2 in Baltimore, Maryland, for 4 seasons. Dr. Anderson earned his Doctor of Philosophy degree in 2001 from Oxford Graduate School's American Centre for Religion and Society Studies in the US, while studying and defending his essays at Oxford University in England. Dr. Anderson currently serves as the Chancellor of Omega Graduate School (formerly Oxford Graduate School). As the founder and senior pastor of Bridgeway Community Church located in Columbia, Maryland, Dr. Anderson reaches a dynamic, multicultural congregation of over 5,000 weekly attendees from more than 52 different nations, and their services are viewed online in over 100 countries. Dr. Anderson is the author of several books on race and diversity, including Letters across the Divide and Multicultural Ministry, the award-winning Gracism: The Art of Inclusion, and I Forgrace You: Doing Good to Those Who Have Hurt You. In 2010, Dr. Anderson edited and co-authored the acclaimed Multicultural Ministry Handbook: Creatively Connecting to a Diverse World. His newest book, How to Think like a Gracist, along with all of Dr. Anderson's resources, are available at EmbraceGracism.com. You can learn more about Dr. Anderson and his work at AndersonSpeaks.com. Dr. Anderson and his family reside in Ellicott City, Maryland.
Morning Lecture: Heather J. Koldewey; marine biologist, en..    Amphitheater
Heather J. Koldewey Marine biologist, environmentalist 10:45 a.m. Friday, July 12, 2019 Heather J. Koldewey is a 2018 National Geographic Fellow and scientific co-lead of the National Geographic Society’s work to better understand the impact and scope of plastic pollution in our waterways through scientific research and exploration. She currently serves as Zoological Society of London’s Senior Technical Advisor. Koldewey co-founded Project Seahorse in 1996, recognized as the world’s leading authority on seahorses and as an early pioneer of community-based marine conservation. More recently, Koldewey co-developed Net-Works, an award-winning project that addresses issues of marine debris and poverty alleviation in coastal communities in developing countries. She also leads the Bertarelli Programme in Marine Science. Koldewey uses collaborative, optimistic and values-based approaches to communicate and engage people in marine conservation, including One Less, a campaign to build a more ocean-friendly society through working to make London the first capital city to stop using single-use plastic water bottles. As a scientific co-lead of National Geographic Society’s plastic work, Koldewey will help lead a team in developing a scientific plan, starting with an initial expedition to study the type and flow of plastic in a river system. Through the expedition, the team will work to provide science-based, actionable information to help local and national governments, NGOs, businesses and the public more effectively invest in and implement innovative solutions to the plastic waste crisis. An Honorary Professor at the University of Exeter, Koldewey graduated with a Bachelor of Science in Biological Sciences (Marine and Fish Biology) at the University of Plymouth, and earned her Ph.D. from Swansea University. Lillygol Sedaghat Multimedia storyteller 10:45 a.m. Friday, July 12, 2019 Lillygol Sedaghat is a National Geographic Explorer and multimedia storyteller at the intersection of science, systems and people. Previously, she was a Fulbright–National Geographic Digital Storyteller documenting Taiwan’s waste management system, plastics recycling, and circular economy initiatives. Through her work, Sedaghat hopes to inspire conscious consumerism — the realization that every choice we make affects the environment — and spark a global discussion on trash with #MyWasteMyWay. Using visual art and digital media to promote environmental education, she aims to transform people’s perceptions of trash from something disposable to something valuable. An active spokesperson for National Geographic’s global Planet or Plastic? Campaign, she has spoken at United Nations World Environment Day India, Influence Nation Summit, and the National Geographic Live series, among other events. She has been named “5 Under 25: Leaders in U.S.-China Relations” by China Hands magazine. Sedaghat received her Bachelor of Arts in political economy from the University of California, Berkeley.
Pittsburgh Ballet Theatre with the Chautauqua Symphony Orc..    Amphitheater
Returning to the Amphitheater stage following a stunning Chautauqua debut in 2017, Pittsburgh Ballet Theatre once again joins forces with the Chautauqua Symphony Orchestra. This program will feature selections from one of the most beloved ballets of all time, Sleeping Beauty. Pyotr Ilyich Tchaikovsky’s lush musical score is celebrated in this concert, which is the second of three performances in the CSO’s inaugural “Russian Festival.” This performance is the first of PBT’s 2019-2020 season, during which they celebrate 50 years! The company will include selected students from Chautauqua’s own School of Dance. Pittsburgh Ballet Theatre, now in its 50th anniversary season, is dedicated to inspiring artists and audiences through extraordinary ballet experiences. Since 1969, PBT has continually strived for excellence and innovation in artistry, repertoire and technique. Under outstanding artistic leadership, the company has cemented its legacy as one of the most exciting ballet companies in the United States. Artistic Director Terrence S. Orr has championed innovation through creating new and exciting versions of traditional ballets, partnering with other compelling companies for fresh and diverse programs, and commissioning original works that push boundaries and elevate the artform. Mr. Orr, former American Ballet Theatre ballet master and principal dancer, has built PBT’s repertoire and strengthened the company’s artistic integrity. Before his arrival in 1997, the company was led by Artistic Director Patricia Wilde, who advanced PBT’s acclaim with an emphasis on virtuosic technique and works by modern masters, including her mentor, George Balanchine. PBT’s eclectic style and irrepressible engery help audiences connect and discover the joy of ballet through more than 50 performances each year at home and on tour. https://www.pbt.org/ (Russian Festival No. 2)
Morning Lecture: Laura L. Carstensen, Founding director, S..    Amphitheater
Laura L. Carstensen is Professor of Psychology and the Fairleigh S. Dickinson Jr. Professor in Public Policy at Stanford University where she serves as founding director of the Stanford Center on Longevity, whose Week Four work with Chautauqua will feature morning lectures, master classes, and special programs. SCL is doing groundbreaking work with a “New Map of Life” Project, recognizing that longer lives present one of the greatest challenges — and one of the greatest opportunities — of the 21st century. Carstensen’s research has been supported continuously by the National Institute on Aging for more than 25 years and she is currently supported through a prestigious MERIT Award. She is the author of numerous academic articles and the book A Long Bright Future: Happiness, Health, and Financial Security in an Age of Increased Longevity. Carstensen has served on the National Advisory Council on Aging and the MacArthur Foundation’s Research Network on an Aging Society. In 2016 she was inducted into the National Academy of Medicine. She has won numerous awards, including the Kleemeier Award from the Gerontological Society of America, a Guggenheim fellowship, and the Master Mentor Award from the American Psychological Association. Carstensen received a Bachelor of Science from the University of Rochester and her Ph.D. in clinical psychology from West Virginia University.
Morning Lecture: Amani M. Allen; associate professor, epid..    Amphitheater
Amani M. Allen is associate professor of epidemiology and community health sciences at the University of California, Berkeley’s School of Public Health, where her research focuses on race and socioeconomic health disparities and the measurement and study of racism as a determining factor of health disparities. Her broad research interest is to integrate social, demographic, and epidemiologic methods to examine racial inequalities in health as they exist across populations, across place, and over the course of lives. Allen is Principal Investigator of the African American Women’s Heart and Health Study, which examines the association between racism stress, cardiovascular biomarkers, and biological stress among black women in the Bay area with particular focus on coping mechanisms; and Co-Principal Investigator of the Bay Area Heart Health Study which examines similar associations among black men with emphasis on coping mechanisms and internalized racism. Her research has included work on doctor-patient race-concordance; the intersection of race, socioeconomic status, and gender on risk for psychological distress, disability outcomes, adult mortality, and child health and development; racial segregation; and racism stress and mental health outcomes. Allen received her Bachelor of Science from University of Maryland, College Park; her Master of Public Health from George Washington University; and her Ph.D. from Johns Hopkins University. She was a Robert Wood Johnson Health and Society Fellow at the University of California, San Francisco and Berkeley.
Morning Lecture: Joseph F. Coughlin; founder, director, MI..    Amphitheater
Joseph F. Coughlin is director of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology AgeLab, a multidisciplinary research program dedicated to inventing new ideas and creatively translate technologies into practical solutions that improve people’s health and enable them to “do things” throughout their lifespan. Coughlin teaches in MIT's Department of Urban Studies & Planning and the Sloan School's Advanced Management Program, and conducts research on the impact of global demographic change and technology trends on consumer behavior and business strategy. He has served on advisory boards for firms such as Bell Canada, British Telecom, Daimler, Fidelity Investments and Sanofi-Aventis. Coughlin was appointed by President George W. Bush to the White House Advisory Committee on Aging and by Governor Charlie Baker to the Governor’s Council on Aging in Massachusetts where he co-chaired the Innovation & Technology Subcommittee. A Behavioral Sciences Fellow of the Gerontological Society of America and a Fellow of Switzerland’s World Demographics & Ageing Forum, Coughlin is a senior contributor to Forbes and writes regularly for MarketWatch and the Wall Street Journal. He was named by Fast Company as one the “100 Most Creative in Business” and by the Wall Street Journal as inventing the future of retirement. Recently, Coughlin was recognized as one of 15 World Minds by the Zurich-based World Minds, a select community of global leaders in science, arts and business. His most recent book is The Longevity Economy: Inside the World's Fastest Growing, Most Misunderstood Market.
Morning Lecture: Linda P. Fried; dean, Columbia University..    Amphitheater
Linda P. Fried, Dean of Columbia’s Mailman School of Public Health, is a leader in the fields of epidemiology and geriatric medicine. A geriatrician also trained in cardiovascular and chronic disease epidemiology, she has dedicated her career to the science of healthy aging and prevention of frailty, disability and cardiovascular disease, and defining how to transition to a world where greater longevity benefits people of all ages. At Columbia, Fried is also the DeLamar Professor of Public Health Practice and senior vice president at Columbia University Irving Medical Center. Fried is the co-designer and co-founder of Experience Corps, and since 2006 has served as a member of the international Network on an Aging Society. She is also global chair of ILINK, the International Loneliness Knowledge Network. She has proposed the concept that it is possible to create a Third Demographic Dividend that enables society and individuals of all ages to experience the benefits of our now-longer lives, based on innovation in health promotion and design of society’s environments and roles for older adults. Prior to Columbia, Fried worked at the Johns Hopkins Medical Institutions, where she served in a number of capacities, including as director of the pan-medical Center on Aging and Health. She is an elected member of the U.S. National Academy of Medicine, an elected member of the Council on Foreign Relations, and served as a member of the World Economic Forum’s Global Agenda Council on Aging. She is the recipient of numerous honors and award, most recently the 2016 French INSERM International Prize in Medical Research and the 2018 Crain’s Notable Women in Health Care. Fried received her bachelor’s degree from the University of Wisconsin; her M.D. from Rush Medical College; and her Master of Public Health degree from the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health.
Morning Devotional: Rev. Dr. Otis Moss III    Amphitheater
With civil rights advocacy in his DNA, Rev. Dr. Otis Moss III built his ministry on community advancement and social justice activism. As Senior Pastor of Trinity United Church of Christ in Chicago, Ill., Dr. Moss spent the last two decades practicing and preaching a Black theology that unapologetically calls attention to the problems of mass incarceration, environmental justice, and economic inequality. A native of Cleveland, Ohio, Dr. Moss is an honors graduate of Morehouse College, who earned a Master of Divinity from Yale Divinity School and a Doctor of Ministry degree from Chicago Theological Seminary. He returned to Yale in 2014 to present the famed Lyman Beecher lectures. The three-day event included an in-depth discourse on the subject of "The Blue Note Gospel: Preaching the Prophetic Blues in a Post Soul World." The lectures, which demonstrated a homiletic blueprint for prophetic preaching in the 21st century, were the foundation of his latest book, Blue Note Preaching in a Post-Soul World: Finding Hope in an Age of Despair, published in 2015. His earlier publications include: Redemption in a Red Light District, and The Gospel According to the Wiz and Other Sermons from Cinema. He co-authored The Gospel Re-Mix: How to Reach the Hip-Hop Generation with three other contributors, and Preach! The Power and Purpose behind Our Praise, with his father. Dr. Moss was named to the inaugural Root 100, a list that “recognizes emerging and established African-American leaders who are making extraordinary contributions,” according to the publication’s Website. Honorees range between ages 25 to 45, and their accomplishments and successes transcend media headlines or statistics. With a unique gift to communicate across generations, Dr. Moss’ creative bible-based messages have inspired young and old alike. His intergenerational preaching gift has made Dr. Moss a popular speaker on college campuses, and at conferences and churches across the globe. Highly influenced by the works of Zora Neale Hurston, August Wilson, Howard Thurman, Jazz, and Hip-Hop music, the work and legacy of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. and the pastoral ministry of his father, Dr. Otis Moss, Jr. of Cleveland, Ohio, have been primary mentors for his spiritual formation. The former pastor of the Tabernacle Baptist Church in Augusta, Ga., his first pastorate, where the church grew from 125 members to over 2100 disciples during his tenure, Dr. Moss is an ordained minister in the Progressive National Baptist Convention and the United Church of Christ. He is on the boards of Auburn Seminary and the Faith-In-Place/Action Fund, and is chaplain of the Children’s Defense Fund’s Samuel DeWitt Proctor Child Advocacy Conference. Dr. Moss is also a Senior Fellow in the Auburn Seniors Fellow Program. Married to his college sweetheart, the former Monica Brown of Orlando, Fla., a Spelman College and Columbia University graduate, he and Monica are the proud parents of two creative and humorous children, Elijah Wynton and Makayla Elon.
Morning Lecture: Trevor Cox, Professor of Acoustic Enginee..    Amphitheater
Trevor Cox is a professor of acoustic engineering at the University of Salford, where his research and teaching focuses on architectural acoustics, signal processing and audio perception. An author and radio broadcaster, Cox has written several books for both academics and the general public, most recently The Sound Book: The Science of the Sonic Wonders of the World and Now You’re Talking: Human Conversation from the Neanderthals to Artificial Intelligence. A former EPSRC Senior Media Fellow, Cox has presented 25 documentaries for BBC radio and has been featured on BBC1, Teachers TV, Discovery and National Geographic channels; one of his most popular interviews concerned the debunking of the myth that “a duck’s quack doesn’t echo.” Cox has helped develop extensive teaching resources for schools and has developed and presented science shows seen by 17,000 students, including appearances at the Royal Albert Hall, the Purcell Rooms at the South Bank Centre and the Royal Institution. Cox has written for New Scientist (with articles on city sounds, acoustic archaeology and Christmas muzak) and The Guardian, and runs a popular website that hosts experiments to test people’s responses to sound: sound101.org, which hosted the hugely popular experiment on the “Worst Sound in the World.” The former president of the Institute of Acoustics, where he is an honorary fellow, Cox has been awarded the IOA’s Tyndall Award, as well as their award for Promoting Acoustics to the Public, and the ASA Science Writing Award for acoustics professionals.
Morning Devotional: Rev. Dr. Otis Moss III    Amphitheater
With civil rights advocacy in his DNA, Rev. Dr. Otis Moss III built his ministry on community advancement and social justice activism. As Senior Pastor of Trinity United Church of Christ in Chicago, Ill., Dr. Moss spent the last two decades practicing and preaching a Black theology that unapologetically calls attention to the problems of mass incarceration, environmental justice, and economic inequality. A native of Cleveland, Ohio, Dr. Moss is an honors graduate of Morehouse College, who earned a Master of Divinity from Yale Divinity School and a Doctor of Ministry degree from Chicago Theological Seminary. He returned to Yale in 2014 to present the famed Lyman Beecher lectures. The three-day event included an in-depth discourse on the subject of "The Blue Note Gospel: Preaching the Prophetic Blues in a Post Soul World." The lectures, which demonstrated a homiletic blueprint for prophetic preaching in the 21st century, were the foundation of his latest book, Blue Note Preaching in a Post-Soul World: Finding Hope in an Age of Despair, published in 2015. His earlier publications include: Redemption in a Red Light District, and The Gospel According to the Wiz and Other Sermons from Cinema. He co-authored The Gospel Re-Mix: How to Reach the Hip-Hop Generation with three other contributors, and Preach! The Power and Purpose behind Our Praise, with his father. Dr. Moss was named to the inaugural Root 100, a list that “recognizes emerging and established African-American leaders who are making extraordinary contributions,” according to the publication’s Website. Honorees range between ages 25 to 45, and their accomplishments and successes transcend media headlines or statistics. With a unique gift to communicate across generations, Dr. Moss’ creative bible-based messages have inspired young and old alike. His intergenerational preaching gift has made Dr. Moss a popular speaker on college campuses, and at conferences and churches across the globe. Highly influenced by the works of Zora Neale Hurston, August Wilson, Howard Thurman, Jazz, and Hip-Hop music, the work and legacy of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. and the pastoral ministry of his father, Dr. Otis Moss, Jr. of Cleveland, Ohio, have been primary mentors for his spiritual formation. The former pastor of the Tabernacle Baptist Church in Augusta, Ga., his first pastorate, where the church grew from 125 members to over 2100 disciples during his tenure, Dr. Moss is an ordained minister in the Progressive National Baptist Convention and the United Church of Christ. He is on the boards of Auburn Seminary and the Faith-In-Place/Action Fund, and is chaplain of the Children’s Defense Fund’s Samuel DeWitt Proctor Child Advocacy Conference. Dr. Moss is also a Senior Fellow in the Auburn Seniors Fellow Program. Married to his college sweetheart, the former Monica Brown of Orlando, Fla., a Spelman College and Columbia University graduate, he and Monica are the proud parents of two creative and humorous children, Elijah Wynton and Makayla Elon.
Morning Lecture: Larry P. Arnn; president, Hillsdale College    Amphitheater
Larry P. Arnn is the 12th president of Hillsdale College, where he also serves as a professor of politics and history, teaching courses on Aristotle, Winston Churchill, and the American Constitution. Under Arnn’s leadership, Hillsdale College has launched several new initiatives, and has established a distinguished visiting fellowship program which brings leading scholars and public figures to campus to teach courses. Imprimis, the college’s national speech digest, has increased its monthly circulation to over 3.7 million. Prior to Hillsdale, Arnn was an editor for Public Research, Syndicated, and then president of Claremont Institute for 15 years, where he was the founding chairman of the California Civil Rights Initiative. Arnn also lived and studied in England, where he served as director of research for the late Sir Martin Gilbert, the official biographer of Winston Churchill. Arnn is on the board of directors of the Heritage Foundation, the Henry Salvatori Center of Claremont McKenna College, the Intercollegiate Studies Institute, and the Claremont Institute. He served on the U.S. Army War College Board of Visitors, for which he earned the Department of the Army’s Outstanding Civilian Service Medal. In 2015, Arnn received the Bradley Prize from the Lynde and Harry Bradley Foundation. Arnn is the author of three books, and editor of The Churchill Documents, a sub-series in the official biography of Winston Churchill. The official biography is the largest of its kind, and under Arnn’s direction, will grow to a total of 31 volumes. Arrn received his Bachelor of Arts from Arkansas State University, and his master’s and Ph.D. from Claremont Graduate School. He also studied at the London School of Economics, and at Worcester College, Oxford University.
Morning Devotional: Rev. Dr. Otis Moss III    Amphitheater
With civil rights advocacy in his DNA, Rev. Dr. Otis Moss III built his ministry on community advancement and social justice activism. As Senior Pastor of Trinity United Church of Christ in Chicago, Ill., Dr. Moss spent the last two decades practicing and preaching a Black theology that unapologetically calls attention to the problems of mass incarceration, environmental justice, and economic inequality. A native of Cleveland, Ohio, Dr. Moss is an honors graduate of Morehouse College, who earned a Master of Divinity from Yale Divinity School and a Doctor of Ministry degree from Chicago Theological Seminary. He returned to Yale in 2014 to present the famed Lyman Beecher lectures. The three-day event included an in-depth discourse on the subject of "The Blue Note Gospel: Preaching the Prophetic Blues in a Post Soul World." The lectures, which demonstrated a homiletic blueprint for prophetic preaching in the 21st century, were the foundation of his latest book, Blue Note Preaching in a Post-Soul World: Finding Hope in an Age of Despair, published in 2015. His earlier publications include: Redemption in a Red Light District, and The Gospel According to the Wiz and Other Sermons from Cinema. He co-authored The Gospel Re-Mix: How to Reach the Hip-Hop Generation with three other contributors, and Preach! The Power and Purpose behind Our Praise, with his father. Dr. Moss was named to the inaugural Root 100, a list that “recognizes emerging and established African-American leaders who are making extraordinary contributions,” according to the publication’s Website. Honorees range between ages 25 to 45, and their accomplishments and successes transcend media headlines or statistics. With a unique gift to communicate across generations, Dr. Moss’ creative bible-based messages have inspired young and old alike. His intergenerational preaching gift has made Dr. Moss a popular speaker on college campuses, and at conferences and churches across the globe. Highly influenced by the works of Zora Neale Hurston, August Wilson, Howard Thurman, Jazz, and Hip-Hop music, the work and legacy of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. and the pastoral ministry of his father, Dr. Otis Moss, Jr. of Cleveland, Ohio, have been primary mentors for his spiritual formation. The former pastor of the Tabernacle Baptist Church in Augusta, Ga., his first pastorate, where the church grew from 125 members to over 2100 disciples during his tenure, Dr. Moss is an ordained minister in the Progressive National Baptist Convention and the United Church of Christ. He is on the boards of Auburn Seminary and the Faith-In-Place/Action Fund, and is chaplain of the Children’s Defense Fund’s Samuel DeWitt Proctor Child Advocacy Conference. Dr. Moss is also a Senior Fellow in the Auburn Seniors Fellow Program. Married to his college sweetheart, the former Monica Brown of Orlando, Fla., a Spelman College and Columbia University graduate, he and Monica are the proud parents of two creative and humorous children, Elijah Wynton and Makayla Elon.
Morning Lecture: Julie A. Washington; Chair, Department of..    Amphitheater
Julie A. Washington is the chair and a professor in the Department of Communication Sciences and Disorders in the College of Education and Human Development at Georgia State University in Atlanta. She specializes in language development and disorders in high-risk populations; early literacy and language interactions; African-American Child English; and African-American student achievement. Washington’s work focuses on understanding cultural dialect use in African-American children with a specific emphasis on the impact of dialect on language assessment, literacy attainment and academic performance. Her work with preschoolers has focused on understanding and improving the emergent literacy skills necessary to support later reading proficiency in high-risk groups, with a special focus on the needs of children growing up in poverty in urban contexts. In addition, Washington is a co-director of the Center for Research on the Challenges of Acquiring Language and Literacy at Georgia State. Currently, Washington is a principal investigator on the Georgia Learning Disabilities Research Innovation Hub, funded by the National Institutes of Health – Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development. This research initiative is focused on improving early identification of reading disabilities in elementary-school-aged African-American children who speak cultural dialects, and includes a focus on children, their families, teachers and communities. Washington earned a Bachelor of Arts degree in English from Spelman College, and her Master of Science and Doctor of Philosophy degrees in Speech and Language Pathology from the University of Michigan.
Morning Devotional: Rev. Dr. Otis Moss III    Amphitheater
With civil rights advocacy in his DNA, Rev. Dr. Otis Moss III built his ministry on community advancement and social justice activism. As Senior Pastor of Trinity United Church of Christ in Chicago, Ill., Dr. Moss spent the last two decades practicing and preaching a Black theology that unapologetically calls attention to the problems of mass incarceration, environmental justice, and economic inequality. A native of Cleveland, Ohio, Dr. Moss is an honors graduate of Morehouse College, who earned a Master of Divinity from Yale Divinity School and a Doctor of Ministry degree from Chicago Theological Seminary. He returned to Yale in 2014 to present the famed Lyman Beecher lectures. The three-day event included an in-depth discourse on the subject of "The Blue Note Gospel: Preaching the Prophetic Blues in a Post Soul World." The lectures, which demonstrated a homiletic blueprint for prophetic preaching in the 21st century, were the foundation of his latest book, Blue Note Preaching in a Post-Soul World: Finding Hope in an Age of Despair, published in 2015. His earlier publications include: Redemption in a Red Light District, and The Gospel According to the Wiz and Other Sermons from Cinema. He co-authored The Gospel Re-Mix: How to Reach the Hip-Hop Generation with three other contributors, and Preach! The Power and Purpose behind Our Praise, with his father. Dr. Moss was named to the inaugural Root 100, a list that “recognizes emerging and established African-American leaders who are making extraordinary contributions,” according to the publication’s Website. Honorees range between ages 25 to 45, and their accomplishments and successes transcend media headlines or statistics. With a unique gift to communicate across generations, Dr. Moss’ creative bible-based messages have inspired young and old alike. His intergenerational preaching gift has made Dr. Moss a popular speaker on college campuses, and at conferences and churches across the globe. Highly influenced by the works of Zora Neale Hurston, August Wilson, Howard Thurman, Jazz, and Hip-Hop music, the work and legacy of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. and the pastoral ministry of his father, Dr. Otis Moss, Jr. of Cleveland, Ohio, have been primary mentors for his spiritual formation. The former pastor of the Tabernacle Baptist Church in Augusta, Ga., his first pastorate, where the church grew from 125 members to over 2100 disciples during his tenure, Dr. Moss is an ordained minister in the Progressive National Baptist Convention and the United Church of Christ. He is on the boards of Auburn Seminary and the Faith-In-Place/Action Fund, and is chaplain of the Children’s Defense Fund’s Samuel DeWitt Proctor Child Advocacy Conference. Dr. Moss is also a Senior Fellow in the Auburn Seniors Fellow Program. Married to his college sweetheart, the former Monica Brown of Orlando, Fla., a Spelman College and Columbia University graduate, he and Monica are the proud parents of two creative and humorous children, Elijah Wynton and Makayla Elon.
Morning Lecture: J. Ekela Kaniaupio-Crozier;E Ola! Learnin..    Amphitheater
J. Ekela Kaniaupio-Crozier is the E Ola! Learning Designer and Facilitator at Kamehameha Schools Maui, where she provides campus support to provide a world class Hawaiian culture-based education to haum?na (students). A fluent speaker of the Hawaiian language, she serves on the Hawai?i Development team for the Duolingo language learning app. Kaniaupio-Crozier pioneered Hawaiian language programs in different communities and spaces; educating preschoolers to k?puna (elders). She has been a Hawaiian language/studies/history instructor for over 40 years at various schools including St. Louis School, Kamehameha Schools Kap?lama/Maui, University of Hawai?i at M?noa, Leeward Community College and University of Hawai?i Maui College, and continues to teach classes on Moloka?i and on Maui free of charge. Kaniaupio-Crozier designed and taught Kul?iwi, the first Hawaiian language distance learning program which aired across the state of Hawai?i and now reaches a worldwide audience via YouTube. She is a consultant on several projects regarding Hawaiian culture, protocol, language and natural resource management. Of particular interest is Ke Kahua located in Waiehu, Maui because of its outreach program to reintegrate the formerly incarcerated kanaka maoli (Native Hawaiians) into the community through hands on learning of traditional Hawaiian agricultural practices. She is a founding member of Ka Papalo?i ?o Kanewai, a culturally sustainable, food producing, agricultural living laboratory at the University of Hawai?i at M?noa. She is the Hope Kahu (Assistant Pastor) of Ekalesia o Kupaianaha, Ho?omana o Ke Akua Ola in Wailuku.
Morning Devotional: Rev. Dr. Otis Moss III    Amphitheater
With civil rights advocacy in his DNA, Rev. Dr. Otis Moss III built his ministry on community advancement and social justice activism. As Senior Pastor of Trinity United Church of Christ in Chicago, Ill., Dr. Moss spent the last two decades practicing and preaching a Black theology that unapologetically calls attention to the problems of mass incarceration, environmental justice, and economic inequality. A native of Cleveland, Ohio, Dr. Moss is an honors graduate of Morehouse College, who earned a Master of Divinity from Yale Divinity School and a Doctor of Ministry degree from Chicago Theological Seminary. He returned to Yale in 2014 to present the famed Lyman Beecher lectures. The three-day event included an in-depth discourse on the subject of "The Blue Note Gospel: Preaching the Prophetic Blues in a Post Soul World." The lectures, which demonstrated a homiletic blueprint for prophetic preaching in the 21st century, were the foundation of his latest book, Blue Note Preaching in a Post-Soul World: Finding Hope in an Age of Despair, published in 2015. His earlier publications include: Redemption in a Red Light District, and The Gospel According to the Wiz and Other Sermons from Cinema. He co-authored The Gospel Re-Mix: How to Reach the Hip-Hop Generation with three other contributors, and Preach! The Power and Purpose behind Our Praise, with his father. Dr. Moss was named to the inaugural Root 100, a list that “recognizes emerging and established African-American leaders who are making extraordinary contributions,” according to the publication’s Website. Honorees range between ages 25 to 45, and their accomplishments and successes transcend media headlines or statistics. With a unique gift to communicate across generations, Dr. Moss’ creative bible-based messages have inspired young and old alike. His intergenerational preaching gift has made Dr. Moss a popular speaker on college campuses, and at conferences and churches across the globe. Highly influenced by the works of Zora Neale Hurston, August Wilson, Howard Thurman, Jazz, and Hip-Hop music, the work and legacy of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. and the pastoral ministry of his father, Dr. Otis Moss, Jr. of Cleveland, Ohio, have been primary mentors for his spiritual formation. The former pastor of the Tabernacle Baptist Church in Augusta, Ga., his first pastorate, where the church grew from 125 members to over 2100 disciples during his tenure, Dr. Moss is an ordained minister in the Progressive National Baptist Convention and the United Church of Christ. He is on the boards of Auburn Seminary and the Faith-In-Place/Action Fund, and is chaplain of the Children’s Defense Fund’s Samuel DeWitt Proctor Child Advocacy Conference. Dr. Moss is also a Senior Fellow in the Auburn Seniors Fellow Program. Married to his college sweetheart, the former Monica Brown of Orlando, Fla., a Spelman College and Columbia University graduate, he and Monica are the proud parents of two creative and humorous children, Elijah Wynton and Makayla Elon.
Morning Devotional: Rev. Susan Sparks    Amphitheater
As a trial lawyer turned standup comedian and Baptist minister, Susan Sparks is America’s only female comedian with a pulpit. A North Carolina native, Susan received her B.A. at the University of North Carolina and a law degree from Wake Forest University. After ten years as a lawyer moonlighting as a standup, she left her practice and spent two years on a solo trip around the world, including working with Mother Teresa’s mission in Calcutta, climbing Mt. Kilimanjaro, and driving her Jeep Wrangler solo from NYC to Alaska. Upon returning home, she entered Union Theological Seminary in New York City, where she earned a Master of Divinity and wrote an honors thesis on humor and religion. In May 2007 Susan was installed as the 15th Senior Minister of the historic Madison Avenue Baptist Church in New York City. She was the first woman pastor in its 170-year history and she remains there to this day. (Y'all come visit!) A featured TEDx speaker, Susan's work with humor, healing, and spirituality has been featured in O (The Oprah) Magazine, the New York Times, and on such networks as ABC, CNN, CBS, and the History Channel. A professional comedian, Susan tours nationally with a stand-up Rabbi and a Muslim comic in the Laugh in Peace Tour. She is also an internationally known preacher and speaker whose wide-ranging clients include the World Bank, colleges and universities, resorts such as Canyon Ranch, religious conventions, and national/regional gatherings for cancer survivors and caregivers (Susan is a breast cancer survivor). In addition to her speaking and preaching, Susan writes a nationally syndicated column through GateHouse Media distributed to over 600 newspapers reaching over 21 million people in 36 states. She is the author of the award-winning book, Laugh Your Way to Grace: Reclaiming the Spiritual Power of Humor, and her second book, Preaching Punchlines: The Ten Commandments of Standup Comedy, is due to be released in the summer of 2019. Susan is the 20th recipient of the John L. Haber Award for Outstanding Contribution to the Arts given by the University of North Carolina (and comedian/alum Lewis Black), as well as a recipient of the Intersections International Award for interfaith work to promote justice and reconciliation among diverse communities. Most importantly, Susan and her husband Toby love to fly-fish, ride their Harleys, eat good BBQ, and root for North Carolina Basketball and the Green Bay Packers.
Morning Devotional: Rev. Susan Sparks    Amphitheater
As a trial lawyer turned standup comedian and Baptist minister, Susan Sparks is America’s only female comedian with a pulpit. A North Carolina native, Susan received her B.A. at the University of North Carolina and a law degree from Wake Forest University. After ten years as a lawyer moonlighting as a standup, she left her practice and spent two years on a solo trip around the world, including working with Mother Teresa’s mission in Calcutta, climbing Mt. Kilimanjaro, and driving her Jeep Wrangler solo from NYC to Alaska. Upon returning home, she entered Union Theological Seminary in New York City, where she earned a Master of Divinity and wrote an honors thesis on humor and religion. In May 2007 Susan was installed as the 15th Senior Minister of the historic Madison Avenue Baptist Church in New York City. She was the first woman pastor in its 170-year history and she remains there to this day. (Y'all come visit!) A featured TEDx speaker, Susan's work with humor, healing, and spirituality has been featured in O (The Oprah) Magazine, the New York Times, and on such networks as ABC, CNN, CBS, and the History Channel. A professional comedian, Susan tours nationally with a stand-up Rabbi and a Muslim comic in the Laugh in Peace Tour. She is also an internationally known preacher and speaker whose wide-ranging clients include the World Bank, colleges and universities, resorts such as Canyon Ranch, religious conventions, and national/regional gatherings for cancer survivors and caregivers (Susan is a breast cancer survivor). In addition to her speaking and preaching, Susan writes a nationally syndicated column through GateHouse Media distributed to over 600 newspapers reaching over 21 million people in 36 states. She is the author of the award-winning book, Laugh Your Way to Grace: Reclaiming the Spiritual Power of Humor, and her second book, Preaching Punchlines: The Ten Commandments of Standup Comedy, is due to be released in the summer of 2019. Susan is the 20th recipient of the John L. Haber Award for Outstanding Contribution to the Arts given by the University of North Carolina (and comedian/alum Lewis Black), as well as a recipient of the Intersections International Award for interfaith work to promote justice and reconciliation among diverse communities. Most importantly, Susan and her husband Toby love to fly-fish, ride their Harleys, eat good BBQ, and root for North Carolina Basketball and the Green Bay Packers.
Morning Lecture: Frank Oz; Muppet performer, film director    Amphitheater
Director, producer, writer, Muppet performer and actor Frank Oz has directed a dozen feature films, created and performed many of the original Muppet characters with the famed Jim Henson and is the performer behind Jedi Master Yoda in all of the Star Wars films. Oz has directed acclaimed comedy, musical comedy, drama, and fantasy films, including “The Muppets take Manhattan” (also sharing screenwriting credit), “Little Shop of Horrors,” “What About Bob?,” “Dirty Rotten Scoundrels,” “Housesitter,” “The Indian in the Cupboard,” “In & Out,” “Bowfinger,” “The Score,” “The Dark Crystal” (co-directed with Henson), the original “Death at a Funeral” and the remake of “The Stepford Wives.” Early in his career Oz became known for creating and performing the legendary Muppet characters Miss Piggy, Fozzie Bear, Animal and Sam Eagle on “The Muppet Show,” Cookie Monster, Bert and Grover on “Sesame Street,” and “The Mighty Favog” on the first season of “Saturday Night Live,” among hundreds of television and film projects. Oz is the recipient of four Emmy Awards — for Outstanding Individual Achievement in Children’s Programming, and for Outstanding Children’s Programming for his work on “Sesame Street”; and for Outstanding Comedy-Variety or Music Series, and Outstanding Individual Achievement in Children’s Programming for “The Muppet Show.” He also won two George Foster Peabody awards, the American Comedy Awards’ Creative Achievement Award, the Art Director’s Guild award, the Saturn Lifetime Achievement Award, three gold and two platinum records, among numerous other honors.
Morning Devotional: Rev. Susan Sparks    Amphitheater
As a trial lawyer turned standup comedian and Baptist minister, Susan Sparks is America’s only female comedian with a pulpit. A North Carolina native, Susan received her B.A. at the University of North Carolina and a law degree from Wake Forest University. After ten years as a lawyer moonlighting as a standup, she left her practice and spent two years on a solo trip around the world, including working with Mother Teresa’s mission in Calcutta, climbing Mt. Kilimanjaro, and driving her Jeep Wrangler solo from NYC to Alaska. Upon returning home, she entered Union Theological Seminary in New York City, where she earned a Master of Divinity and wrote an honors thesis on humor and religion. In May 2007 Susan was installed as the 15th Senior Minister of the historic Madison Avenue Baptist Church in New York City. She was the first woman pastor in its 170-year history and she remains there to this day. (Y'all come visit!) A featured TEDx speaker, Susan's work with humor, healing, and spirituality has been featured in O (The Oprah) Magazine, the New York Times, and on such networks as ABC, CNN, CBS, and the History Channel. A professional comedian, Susan tours nationally with a stand-up Rabbi and a Muslim comic in the Laugh in Peace Tour. She is also an internationally known preacher and speaker whose wide-ranging clients include the World Bank, colleges and universities, resorts such as Canyon Ranch, religious conventions, and national/regional gatherings for cancer survivors and caregivers (Susan is a breast cancer survivor). In addition to her speaking and preaching, Susan writes a nationally syndicated column through GateHouse Media distributed to over 600 newspapers reaching over 21 million people in 36 states. She is the author of the award-winning book, Laugh Your Way to Grace: Reclaiming the Spiritual Power of Humor, and her second book, Preaching Punchlines: The Ten Commandments of Standup Comedy, is due to be released in the summer of 2019. Susan is the 20th recipient of the John L. Haber Award for Outstanding Contribution to the Arts given by the University of North Carolina (and comedian/alum Lewis Black), as well as a recipient of the Intersections International Award for interfaith work to promote justice and reconciliation among diverse communities. Most importantly, Susan and her husband Toby love to fly-fish, ride their Harleys, eat good BBQ, and root for North Carolina Basketball and the Green Bay Packers.
Morning Devotional: Rev. Susan Sparks    Amphitheater
As a trial lawyer turned standup comedian and Baptist minister, Susan Sparks is America’s only female comedian with a pulpit. A North Carolina native, Susan received her B.A. at the University of North Carolina and a law degree from Wake Forest University. After ten years as a lawyer moonlighting as a standup, she left her practice and spent two years on a solo trip around the world, including working with Mother Teresa’s mission in Calcutta, climbing Mt. Kilimanjaro, and driving her Jeep Wrangler solo from NYC to Alaska. Upon returning home, she entered Union Theological Seminary in New York City, where she earned a Master of Divinity and wrote an honors thesis on humor and religion. In May 2007 Susan was installed as the 15th Senior Minister of the historic Madison Avenue Baptist Church in New York City. She was the first woman pastor in its 170-year history and she remains there to this day. (Y'all come visit!) A featured TEDx speaker, Susan's work with humor, healing, and spirituality has been featured in O (The Oprah) Magazine, the New York Times, and on such networks as ABC, CNN, CBS, and the History Channel. A professional comedian, Susan tours nationally with a stand-up Rabbi and a Muslim comic in the Laugh in Peace Tour. She is also an internationally known preacher and speaker whose wide-ranging clients include the World Bank, colleges and universities, resorts such as Canyon Ranch, religious conventions, and national/regional gatherings for cancer survivors and caregivers (Susan is a breast cancer survivor). In addition to her speaking and preaching, Susan writes a nationally syndicated column through GateHouse Media distributed to over 600 newspapers reaching over 21 million people in 36 states. She is the author of the award-winning book, Laugh Your Way to Grace: Reclaiming the Spiritual Power of Humor, and her second book, Preaching Punchlines: The Ten Commandments of Standup Comedy, is due to be released in the summer of 2019. Susan is the 20th recipient of the John L. Haber Award for Outstanding Contribution to the Arts given by the University of North Carolina (and comedian/alum Lewis Black), as well as a recipient of the Intersections International Award for interfaith work to promote justice and reconciliation among diverse communities. Most importantly, Susan and her husband Toby love to fly-fish, ride their Harleys, eat good BBQ, and root for North Carolina Basketball and the Green Bay Packers.
Morning Lecture: “Managing Genius: 43 Years with Robin W..    Amphitheater
David Steinberg managed Robin Williams’ career for 43 years, and served as executive producer for the 2018 HBO documentary, “Robin Williams: Come Inside My Mind” to critical acclaim. Steinberg describes Williams as his “brother from another mother,” and is quoted in TIME-LIFE’s “Comic Genius” saying, “I watched him perform for 80,000 people, and for 50 people. His audiences ranged from heavily armed soldiers in the hills of Afghanistan, to injured soldiers in Munich, Germany … from the Queen of England by day, to her rowdy subjects by night. He lifted spirits, brought joy, and was loved by everyone, everywhere he went.” Steinberg began his career in public relations representing Sammy Davis, Jr. and Peter Sellers, among others, before eventually forming Morra Brezner Steinberg & Tenenbaum Entertainment, representing artists including Billy Crystal, David Letterman, Martin Short, Robert Klein and Woody Allen, specializing in the world of comedy. Steinberg also developed the feature films “Good Morning Vietnam,” and “Throw Momma From the Train,” and created the HBO stand-up comedy series, “Women of the Night” starring Ellen Degeneres, Paula Poundstone, Rita Rudner, and future “Daily Show” creator Lizz Winstead. Writing and producing hours of programming for variety television such as the Oscars, ESPYs, and comedy specials, his work has garnered recognition with Cable Ace, Emmy, Writers Guild and Grammy awards. Steinberg is currently involved with producing the Stand-Up Hall of Fame special for Netflix, the physical home of which will be the National Comedy Center in Jamestown, New York. Lewis Black is a writer, social critic, comedian, and Robin Williams’ longtime friend. The author of three books and more than 40 plays, in the 1980s, Black was playwright-in-residence at the West Bank Café’s Downstairs Theatre Bar, where he oversaw the development of more than 1,000 plays, including works by Aaron Sorkin, Alan Ball, as well as his own original works. In 1996, he was tapped to create a weekly segment for Comedy Central’s “The Daily Show.” That segment evolved into Back in Black, becoming one of the most popular and longest-running segments on the show. Additionally, Black has released nine albums, received five Grammy nominations and two wins for his work. Black’s prolific television work includes appearing on CNN and MSNBC, “Inside the NFL,” (for which he earned a Sports Emmy) and acting in the ABC mini-series “Madoff.” He has also taped four specials for the “Comedy Central Presents” series and filmed two specials for HBO, including “Red, White and Screwed,” which was nominated for an Emmy. Black is involved in numerous charities and nonprofits, and was honored by The Brady Center for his commitment to ending gun violence. In 2012, he was honored by the ACLU of Georgia with their National Civil Liberties Award. At the Williamstown Theatre Festival, he established the William Foeller Fellowship. Additionally, Black also has performed in three tours with the USO, visiting several Middle Eastern and European military bases. He is a graduate of The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill and the Yale Drama School.
Morning Devotional: Rev. Susan Sparks    Amphitheater
As a trial lawyer turned standup comedian and Baptist minister, Susan Sparks is America’s only female comedian with a pulpit. A North Carolina native, Susan received her B.A. at the University of North Carolina and a law degree from Wake Forest University. After ten years as a lawyer moonlighting as a standup, she left her practice and spent two years on a solo trip around the world, including working with Mother Teresa’s mission in Calcutta, climbing Mt. Kilimanjaro, and driving her Jeep Wrangler solo from NYC to Alaska. Upon returning home, she entered Union Theological Seminary in New York City, where she earned a Master of Divinity and wrote an honors thesis on humor and religion. In May 2007 Susan was installed as the 15th Senior Minister of the historic Madison Avenue Baptist Church in New York City. She was the first woman pastor in its 170-year history and she remains there to this day. (Y'all come visit!) A featured TEDx speaker, Susan's work with humor, healing, and spirituality has been featured in O (The Oprah) Magazine, the New York Times, and on such networks as ABC, CNN, CBS, and the History Channel. A professional comedian, Susan tours nationally with a stand-up Rabbi and a Muslim comic in the Laugh in Peace Tour. She is also an internationally known preacher and speaker whose wide-ranging clients include the World Bank, colleges and universities, resorts such as Canyon Ranch, religious conventions, and national/regional gatherings for cancer survivors and caregivers (Susan is a breast cancer survivor). In addition to her speaking and preaching, Susan writes a nationally syndicated column through GateHouse Media distributed to over 600 newspapers reaching over 21 million people in 36 states. She is the author of the award-winning book, Laugh Your Way to Grace: Reclaiming the Spiritual Power of Humor, and her second book, Preaching Punchlines: The Ten Commandments of Standup Comedy, is due to be released in the summer of 2019. Susan is the 20th recipient of the John L. Haber Award for Outstanding Contribution to the Arts given by the University of North Carolina (and comedian/alum Lewis Black), as well as a recipient of the Intersections International Award for interfaith work to promote justice and reconciliation among diverse communities. Most importantly, Susan and her husband Toby love to fly-fish, ride their Harleys, eat good BBQ, and root for North Carolina Basketball and the Green Bay Packers.
Morning Lecture: Maria Bamford, comedian, actress, executi..    Amphitheater
Stand-up comedian and actress Maria Bamford is the star and executive producer of the semi-autobiographical Netflix comedy series “Lady Dynamite,” created by Mitch Hurwitz (“Arrested Development”) and Pam Brady (“South Park”). She is also the creator and star of “Maria Bamford: the special special special” and of the cult hit web series, “The Maria Bamford Show.” Bamford was the first female comic to have two half-hour Comedy Central Presents specials and starred alongside Patton Oswalt, Zach Galifianakis and Brian Posehn in the Comedy Central series “The Comedians of Comedy” and Netflix’s “Comedians of Comedy: The Movie.” She has voiced characters on countless animation series, including “Big Mouth,” “Talking Tom and Friends,” “BoJack Horseman,” “Adventure Time,” “Bob’s Burgers,” “Legend of Korra,” “Puss in Boots,” “CatDog” and PBS’ Emmy-winning series “Word Girl.” Bamford played DeBrie Bardeaux on the Netflix reboot of “Arrested Development” and also recurred on the ABC hit series, “Fresh off the Boat.” Bamford is the 2014 winner of the American Comedy Award for Best Club Comic; her late-night appearances include “Conan,” “The Tonight Show,” “The Late Show with Stephen Colbert” and “Late Night with Seth Meyers.” A graduate of the University of Minnesota, where she earned a bachelor’s degree in creative writing, Bamford also studied at the University of Edinburgh in Scotland, where she was the first female member of the college’s improv comedy group, The Improverts. Bamford will be interviewed by Ophira Eisenberg, the host of NPR’s and WNYC’s weekly trivia, puzzle, and game show “Ask Me Another’ — half raucous pub trivia, half comedy talk show with witty banter, celebrity guests, and live music blended in. It currently airs on public radio and is available on iTunes or from the NPR website. Eisenberg has recently performed on “The Late Late Show with Craig Ferguson,” and has appeared on Comedy Central, VH-1, “The Today Show,” TV Guide Channel’s “Standup In Stilettos,” Fox, E! Channel, CNN, Oxygen Network, and the AXS Network. In Canada, she appeared in her own comedy special for CTV’s Comedy Now. She is the author of the memoir, Screw Everyone: Sleeping My Way to Monogamy, and her writing has been featured in five anthologies including, I Killed: True Stories of the Road from America’s Top Comics; Rejected: Tales of the Failed, Dumped, and Canceled; and Heeb magazine’s Sex, Drugs, and Gelfite Fish. She has also contributed to US Weekly’s “Fashion Police” and YourTango.com. Eisenberg regularly tell stories and tours with the storytelling nonprofit group The Moth, and her stories have also been featured on their “Audience Favorites” CD, podcast, and award-winning radio show.
Morning Devotional: Rev. Dr. Barbara Lundblad    Amphitheater
Barbara K. Lundblad is the Joe R. Engle Professor of Preaching Emerita at Union Theological Seminary. She received a B.A. degree from Augustana College and a Master of Divinity degree from Yale Divinity School. In addition she is the recipient of several honorary doctorates including Lutheran School of Theology at Chicago. An ordained pastor of the Evangelical Lutheran Church in America, she served for sixteen years as pastor of Our Saviour’s Atonement Lutheran Church in New York City. While teaching at Union she also served as Pastoral Associate at Advent Lutheran Church in Manhattan. A preacher on The Protestant Hour radio program (now Day 1) since 1983, Professor Lundblad has appeared on the Chicago Evening Club television series “30 Good Minutes.” She has preached in hundreds of congregations and universities; has lectured extensively in this country and internationally; and has given the Beecher Lectures at Yale Divinity School. She is the author of Transforming the Stone: Preaching through Resistance to Change and Marking Time: Preaching Biblical Stories in Present Tense. In addition she has written articles for Christianity & Crisis, Christian Century, Journal for Preachers, The Living Pulpit, Word and World, and Currents in Theology and Mission. In 2014 the Academy of Homiletics honored her with the Lifetime Achievement Award. She is currently the editor of “Preaching Helps,” a regular feature of the journal Currents in Theology and Mission. This will be Barbara’s sixth Chaplaincy at Chautauqua.
Morning Lecture: Krista Tippett, host, "On Being"; Lennon ..    Amphitheater
Krista Tippett is the founder and CEO of The On Being Project, host of “On Being,” curator of The Civil Conversations Project who, as Week Seven’s host and co-curator, will be leading daily conversations in the Amphitheater. A journalist and former diplomat who had studied theology, Tippett saw a black hole where intelligent conversation about the religious, spiritual, and moral aspects of human life might be. She pitched and piloted her idea for a show for several years before launching “Speaking of Faith” — later “On Being” — as a weekly national public radio show in 2003. “On Being” is now a pursuit of the ancient and enduring human questions that gave rise to our spiritual traditions and resonate through every institution anew in this century. The show is now heard on over 400 public radio stations and a successful podcast, is produced by On Being Studios, together with the On Being Blog, initiatives like the Poetry Radio Project and Public Theology Reimagined, and an expanding portfolio of new podcasts. Additionally, Tippett is the curator of The Civil Conversations Project, and founder of the independent, non-profit public life and media initiative The On Being Project. Tippett is the author of Speaking of Faith; Einstein’s God; and Becoming Wise: An Inquiry into the Mystery and Art of Living. She is at work on her next book, Letters to a Young Citizen. For her work, President Barack Obama awarded Tippett the National Humanities Medal in 2014. Tippett is a graduate of Brown University and holds a Masters of Divinity from Yale University. Lennon Flowers is hell-bent on creating spaces where humans can be human, out of a belief that nothing is done in isolation, and that self-help only works in community. Flowers is a co-founder of The People’s Supper, which uses shared meals to build trust and connection among people of different identities and perspectives. Since Jan. 20, 2017, The People's Supper has powered more than 1,400 suppers across the country, with partners including the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, Righteous Persons Foundation, USC Center EDGE, the Mayor’s Office in Erie, Pennsylvania, the Obama Foundation, and more. Flowers also is the co-founder and executive director of The Dinner Party, a platform for grieving 20- and 30-somethings to find peer community, build lasting relationships, and engage with others to heal. To date, they’ve connected more than 6,000 peers to one another, and currently support more than 4,000 active members who gather bimonthly at more than 275 local tables in 95 cities and towns. Flowers has written for CNN, Fast Company, YES!, Forbes, Open Democracy, and others. She is an Ashoka Fellow and an Aspen Ideas Scholar, and a Phi Beta Kappa graduate of UNC-Chapel Hill. Named one of 15 Faith Leaders to Watch by the Center for American Progress, the Rev. Jennifer Bailey is an ordained minister, public theologian, and national leader in the multi-faith movement for justice. She is the executive director of Faith Matters Network and co-founder of The People's Supper, a project that aims to repair the breach in our interpersonal relationships across political, ideological, and identity difference over shared meals. Since Jan. 20, 2017, the People's Supper has hosted over 1,400 dinners in 121 communities across the United States. An Ashoka Fellow, Aspen Ideas Scholar, On Being Fellow, and Truman Scholar, Bailey earned degrees from Tufts University and Vanderbilt University Divinity School, where she was awarded the Wilbur F. Tillett Prize for accomplishments in the study of theology. A sought after commentator and public speaker on the intersection of religion and public life, Bailey has spoken on the national and international stage at the inaugural Obama Foundation Summit, Makers, TEDxSkoll, and the White House. Her writing has appeared in Salon, the Huffington Post, Sojourners, On Being, and the Washington Post’s Lily Blog, among others. Bailey is ordained in the African Methodist Episcopal Church.
Morning Devotional: Rev. Dr. Barbara Lundblad    Amphitheater
Barbara K. Lundblad is the Joe R. Engle Professor of Preaching Emerita at Union Theological Seminary. She received a B.A. degree from Augustana College and a Master of Divinity degree from Yale Divinity School. In addition she is the recipient of several honorary doctorates including Lutheran School of Theology at Chicago. An ordained pastor of the Evangelical Lutheran Church in America, she served for sixteen years as pastor of Our Saviour’s Atonement Lutheran Church in New York City. While teaching at Union she also served as Pastoral Associate at Advent Lutheran Church in Manhattan. A preacher on The Protestant Hour radio program (now Day 1) since 1983, Professor Lundblad has appeared on the Chicago Evening Club television series “30 Good Minutes.” She has preached in hundreds of congregations and universities; has lectured extensively in this country and internationally; and has given the Beecher Lectures at Yale Divinity School. She is the author of Transforming the Stone: Preaching through Resistance to Change and Marking Time: Preaching Biblical Stories in Present Tense. In addition she has written articles for Christianity & Crisis, Christian Century, Journal for Preachers, The Living Pulpit, Word and World, and Currents in Theology and Mission. In 2014 the Academy of Homiletics honored her with the Lifetime Achievement Award. She is currently the editor of “Preaching Helps,” a regular feature of the journal Currents in Theology and Mission. This will be Barbara’s sixth Chaplaincy at Chautauqua.
Morning Lecture: Krista Tippett, host, "On Being"; Imani P..    Amphitheater
Krista Tippett is the founder and CEO of The On Being Project, host of “On Being,” curator of The Civil Conversations Project who, as Week Seven’s host and co-curator, will be leading daily conversations in the Amphitheater. A journalist and former diplomat who had studied theology, Tippett saw a black hole where intelligent conversation about the religious, spiritual, and moral aspects of human life might be. She pitched and piloted her idea for a show for several years before launching “Speaking of Faith” — later “On Being” — as a weekly national public radio show in 2003. “On Being” is now a pursuit of the ancient and enduring human questions that gave rise to our spiritual traditions and resonate through every institution anew in this century. The show is now heard on over 400 public radio stations and a successful podcast, is produced by On Being Studios, together with the On Being Blog, initiatives like the Poetry Radio Project and Public Theology Reimagined, and an expanding portfolio of new podcasts. Additionally, Tippett is the curator of The Civil Conversations Project, and founder of the independent, non-profit public life and media initiative The On Being Project. Tippett is the author of Speaking of Faith; Einstein’s God; and Becoming Wise: An Inquiry into the Mystery and Art of Living. She is at work on her next book, Letters to a Young Citizen. For her work, President Barack Obama awarded Tippett the National Humanities Medal in 2014. Tippett is a graduate of Brown University and holds a Masters of Divinity from Yale University. Imani Perry is the Hughes-Rogers Professor of African American Studies at Princeton University, where she is also affiliated with the University Center for Human Values, The Program in Law and Public Affairs, Gender and Sexuality Studies and Jazz Studies. A scholar of legal history, cultural studies and African American studies, her work often focuses on multifaceted issues such as the influence of race on law, literature and music. Perry is the author of five books, including Looking for Lorraine: The Radiant and Radical Life of Lorraine Hansberry, the winner of the 2019 Pen America Bograd Weld Award for Biography, and a New York Times Notable Book for 2018. Other works include May We Forever Stand: A History of the Black National Anthem, a 2019 NAACP Image Award nominee, and Vexy Thing: On Gender and Liberation, in addition to numerous scholarly articles. Perry has written book reviews, essays, and opinion pieces for newspapers and journals including Harper’s, The New York Times, The San Francisco Chronicle, The Guardian and The Progressive. In September 2019 her book Breathe: A Letter to my Son will be published by Beacon Press. Perry received a bachelor’s degree from Yale University, her J.D. from Harvard Law School and a Ph.D in the history of American civilization from Harvard University.
Morning Devotional: Rev. Dr. Barbara Lundblad    Amphitheater
Barbara K. Lundblad is the Joe R. Engle Professor of Preaching Emerita at Union Theological Seminary. She received a B.A. degree from Augustana College and a Master of Divinity degree from Yale Divinity School. In addition she is the recipient of several honorary doctorates including Lutheran School of Theology at Chicago. An ordained pastor of the Evangelical Lutheran Church in America, she served for sixteen years as pastor of Our Saviour’s Atonement Lutheran Church in New York City. While teaching at Union she also served as Pastoral Associate at Advent Lutheran Church in Manhattan. A preacher on The Protestant Hour radio program (now Day 1) since 1983, Professor Lundblad has appeared on the Chicago Evening Club television series “30 Good Minutes.” She has preached in hundreds of congregations and universities; has lectured extensively in this country and internationally; and has given the Beecher Lectures at Yale Divinity School. She is the author of Transforming the Stone: Preaching through Resistance to Change and Marking Time: Preaching Biblical Stories in Present Tense. In addition she has written articles for Christianity & Crisis, Christian Century, Journal for Preachers, The Living Pulpit, Word and World, and Currents in Theology and Mission. In 2014 the Academy of Homiletics honored her with the Lifetime Achievement Award. She is currently the editor of “Preaching Helps,” a regular feature of the journal Currents in Theology and Mission. This will be Barbara’s sixth Chaplaincy at Chautauqua.
Morning Lecture: Krista Tippett, host, "On Being"; Richard..    Amphitheater
Krista Tippett is the founder and CEO of The On Being Project, host of “On Being,” curator of The Civil Conversations Project who, as Week Seven’s host and co-curator, will be leading daily conversations in the Amphitheater. A journalist and former diplomat who had studied theology, Tippett saw a black hole where intelligent conversation about the religious, spiritual, and moral aspects of human life might be. She pitched and piloted her idea for a show for several years before launching “Speaking of Faith” — later “On Being” — as a weekly national public radio show in 2003. “On Being” is now a pursuit of the ancient and enduring human questions that gave rise to our spiritual traditions and resonate through every institution anew in this century. The show is now heard on over 400 public radio stations and a successful podcast, is produced by On Being Studios, together with the On Being Blog, initiatives like the Poetry Radio Project and Public Theology Reimagined, and an expanding portfolio of new podcasts. Additionally, Tippett is the curator of The Civil Conversations Project, and founder of the independent, non-profit public life and media initiative The On Being Project. Tippett is the author of Speaking of Faith; Einstein’s God; and Becoming Wise: An Inquiry into the Mystery and Art of Living. She is at work on her next book, Letters to a Young Citizen. For her work, President Barack Obama awarded Tippett the National Humanities Medal in 2014. Tippett is a graduate of Brown University and holds a Masters of Divinity from Yale University. Selected by President Barack Obama as the fifth inaugural poet in U.S. history, Richard Blanco is the youngest and the first Latino, immigrant, and gay person to serve in such a role. Born in Madrid to Cuban exile parents and raised in Miami, the negotiation of cultural identity characterizes his three collections of poetry: City of a Hundred Fires, which received the Agnes Starrett Poetry Prize from the University of Pittsburgh Press; Directions to The Beach of the Dead, recipient of the Beyond Margins Award from the PEN American Center; and Looking for The Gulf Motel, recipient of the Paterson Poetry Prize and the Thom Gunn Award. He has also authored the memoirs For All of Us, One Today: An Inaugural Poet’s Journey and The Prince of Los Cocuyos: A Miami Childhood, winner of a Lambda Literary Award. His inaugural poem “One Today” was published as a children’s book, in collaboration with renowned illustrator Dav Pilkey. His latest book, Boundaries, a collaboration with photographer Jacob Hessler, challenges the physical and psychological dividing lines that shadow the United States. A new book of poems, How to Love a Country, is forthcoming from Beacon Press in April 2019. Blanco is a Woodrow Wilson Fellow and has taught at Georgetown University, American University, and Wesleyan University. He serves as the first Education Ambassador for The Academy of American Poets.
Paul Taylor Dance Company    Amphitheater
Paul Taylor helped shape and define American modern dance from the earliest days of his career as a choreographer in 1954 to his death in 2018. Michael Novak succeeds Paul Taylor as Artistic Director of this legacy dance company, and Chautauqua Institution is proud to be part of the one-year tour that celebrates Paul Taylor’s life and most defining works. Novak shares, “I am determined to further Paul Taylor’s vision and to bring his gems to every part of the globe…and to make sure modern dance remains a transformative force for good in our lives long into the future.” This evening’s concert features Aureole (music by George Handel), 3 Epitaphs (performed to early New Orleans jazz), Piazzolla Caldera (music by Astor Piazzolla and Jerzy Peterburshsky) and Esplanade (music by Johann Sebastian Bach). The exuberant Esplanade was dubbed an instant classic and has come to be regarded as among the greatest dances ever created. http://www.ptamd.org/main/about-ptamd/ptdc/ https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=blq1BNhyyVg Residency The Paul Taylor Dance Company and Taylor 2 will be in residence on the grounds of Chautauqua Institution August 6–10. Taylor 2 will be presenting over ten residency activities and classes that will delight community members throughout the week. Be looking for Taylor Movement Classes offered through Special Studies, mini-performances, open rehearsals, a pre-concert chat and more! http://www.ptamd.org/main/about-ptamd/taylor-2/
Morning Devotional: Rev. Dr. Barbara Lundblad    Amphitheater
Barbara K. Lundblad is the Joe R. Engle Professor of Preaching Emerita at Union Theological Seminary. She received a B.A. degree from Augustana College and a Master of Divinity degree from Yale Divinity School. In addition she is the recipient of several honorary doctorates including Lutheran School of Theology at Chicago. An ordained pastor of the Evangelical Lutheran Church in America, she served for sixteen years as pastor of Our Saviour’s Atonement Lutheran Church in New York City. While teaching at Union she also served as Pastoral Associate at Advent Lutheran Church in Manhattan. A preacher on The Protestant Hour radio program (now Day 1) since 1983, Professor Lundblad has appeared on the Chicago Evening Club television series “30 Good Minutes.” She has preached in hundreds of congregations and universities; has lectured extensively in this country and internationally; and has given the Beecher Lectures at Yale Divinity School. She is the author of Transforming the Stone: Preaching through Resistance to Change and Marking Time: Preaching Biblical Stories in Present Tense. In addition she has written articles for Christianity & Crisis, Christian Century, Journal for Preachers, The Living Pulpit, Word and World, and Currents in Theology and Mission. In 2014 the Academy of Homiletics honored her with the Lifetime Achievement Award. She is currently the editor of “Preaching Helps,” a regular feature of the journal Currents in Theology and Mission. This will be Barbara’s sixth Chaplaincy at Chautauqua.
Morning Lecture: Krista Tippett, host, "On Being"; Serene ..    Amphitheater
Krista Tippett is the founder and CEO of The On Being Project, host of “On Being,” curator of The Civil Conversations Project who, as Week Seven’s host and co-curator, will be leading daily conversations in the Amphitheater. A journalist and former diplomat who had studied theology, Tippett saw a black hole where intelligent conversation about the religious, spiritual, and moral aspects of human life might be. She pitched and piloted her idea for a show for several years before launching “Speaking of Faith” — later “On Being” — as a weekly national public radio show in 2003. “On Being” is now a pursuit of the ancient and enduring human questions that gave rise to our spiritual traditions and resonate through every institution anew in this century. The show is now heard on over 400 public radio stations and a successful podcast, is produced by On Being Studios, together with the On Being Blog, initiatives like the Poetry Radio Project and Public Theology Reimagined, and an expanding portfolio of new podcasts. Additionally, Tippett is the curator of The Civil Conversations Project, and founder of the independent, non-profit public life and media initiative The On Being Project. Tippett is the author of Speaking of Faith; Einstein’s God; and Becoming Wise: An Inquiry into the Mystery and Art of Living. She is at work on her next book, Letters to a Young Citizen. For her work, President Barack Obama awarded Tippett the National Humanities Medal in 2014. Tippett is a graduate of Brown University and holds a Masters of Divinity from Yale University. A highly respected scholar and public intellectual, the Rev. Dr. Serene Jones is the 16th president of the historic Union Theological Seminary in the City of New York. The first woman to head the 182-year-old institution, Jones occupies the Johnston Family Chair for Religion and Democracy. She is a past president of the American Academy of Religion, which annually hosts the world’s largest gathering of scholars of religion. Jones came to Union after 17 years at Yale University, where she was the Titus Street Professor of Theology at Yale Divinity School, and chair of the university’s Women, Gender and Sexuality Studies Program. Jones is the author of dozens of articles and book chapters and several books, including Trauma and Grace and her recently released memoir, Call It Grace: Finding Meaning in a Fractured World. Jones, a popular public speaker, is sought by media to comment on major issues impacting society because of her deep grounding in theology, politics, women’s studies, economics, race studies, history, and ethics. An ordained minister in both the Christian Church (Disciples of Christ) and the United Church of Christ, Jones received her bachelor’s from the University of Oklahoma, where she graduated Phi Beta Kappa; her Master of Divinity from Yale Divinity School, and her doctorate from Yale University.
Morning Devotional: Rev. Dr. Barbara Lundblad    Amphitheater
Barbara K. Lundblad is the Joe R. Engle Professor of Preaching Emerita at Union Theological Seminary. She received a B.A. degree from Augustana College and a Master of Divinity degree from Yale Divinity School. In addition she is the recipient of several honorary doctorates including Lutheran School of Theology at Chicago. An ordained pastor of the Evangelical Lutheran Church in America, she served for sixteen years as pastor of Our Saviour’s Atonement Lutheran Church in New York City. While teaching at Union she also served as Pastoral Associate at Advent Lutheran Church in Manhattan. A preacher on The Protestant Hour radio program (now Day 1) since 1983, Professor Lundblad has appeared on the Chicago Evening Club television series “30 Good Minutes.” She has preached in hundreds of congregations and universities; has lectured extensively in this country and internationally; and has given the Beecher Lectures at Yale Divinity School. She is the author of Transforming the Stone: Preaching through Resistance to Change and Marking Time: Preaching Biblical Stories in Present Tense. In addition she has written articles for Christianity & Crisis, Christian Century, Journal for Preachers, The Living Pulpit, Word and World, and Currents in Theology and Mission. In 2014 the Academy of Homiletics honored her with the Lifetime Achievement Award. She is currently the editor of “Preaching Helps,” a regular feature of the journal Currents in Theology and Mission. This will be Barbara’s sixth Chaplaincy at Chautauqua.
Morning Lecture: Krista Tippett, host, "On Being"; Michael..    Amphitheater
Krista Tippett is the founder and CEO of The On Being Project, host of “On Being,” curator of The Civil Conversations Project who, as Week Seven’s host and co-curator, will be leading daily conversations in the Amphitheater. A journalist and former diplomat who had studied theology, Tippett saw a black hole where intelligent conversation about the religious, spiritual, and moral aspects of human life might be. She pitched and piloted her idea for a show for several years before launching “Speaking of Faith” — later “On Being” — as a weekly national public radio show in 2003. “On Being” is now a pursuit of the ancient and enduring human questions that gave rise to our spiritual traditions and resonate through every institution anew in this century. The show is now heard on over 400 public radio stations and a successful podcast, is produced by On Being Studios, together with the On Being Blog, initiatives like the Poetry Radio Project and Public Theology Reimagined, and an expanding portfolio of new podcasts. Additionally, Tippett is the curator of The Civil Conversations Project, and founder of the independent, non-profit public life and media initiative The On Being Project. Tippett is the author of Speaking of Faith; Einstein’s God; and Becoming Wise: An Inquiry into the Mystery and Art of Living. She is at work on her next book, Letters to a Young Citizen. For her work, President Barack Obama awarded Tippett the National Humanities Medal in 2014. Tippett is a graduate of Brown University and holds a Masters of Divinity from Yale University. Michael E. Hill began his work as 18th President of Chautauqua Institution on Jan. 1, 2017, and immediately set about ushering in a fresh, expanded vision for the 145-year-old Institution, with emphasis on building its brand and thought leadership with a focus on expanding civil dialogue in the nation, an evolution to year-round programming, and engagement beyond Chautauqua's physical grounds. Prior to his appointment at Chautauqua, Hill served as president and chief executive officer of Youth For Understanding USA, dramatically expanding and diversifying programs. He co-led a historic civil rights trip to Cuba with the Gay Men’s Chorus of Washington, D.C., at the invitation of Mariela Castro, two weeks before diplomatic relations were restored between the U.S. and the island nation. Prior to joining YFU, he served as Senior Vice President of External Affairs for United Cerebral Palsy, and led national development, communications and volunteer efforts for Washington National Cathedral as Executive Director for External Relations and held a similar role at The Washington Ballet. He also directed a $125 million effort to expand the historic Arena Stage, and served as executive director of St. Bonaventure University’s Regina A. Quick Center for the Arts. Hill holds a bachelor’s in journalism from St. Bonaventure and a master’s in arts and cultural management from Saint Mary's University of Minnesota.
Paul Taylor Dance Company with the Chautauqua Symphony Orc..    Amphitheater
Paul Taylor Dance Company will mark 65 years of unrivaled creativity led by Paul Taylor, a cultural icon and one of American history’s most celebrated artists. This evening’s performance will feature works with live orchestra: Concertiana (music by Eric Ewazen), Dust (music by Francis Poulenc) and Promethean Fire (music by Johann Sebastian Bach). Concertiana was Mr. Taylor’s final work, premiering at Lincoln Center in 2018. Of Dust, the New York Times says, “It has grandeur, majesty and a spiritual dimension. It is also quite simply one of the best dance works choreographed by Paul Taylor.” Promethean Fire is set to three keyboard works by Bach and richly orchestrated by Stokowski. The work features all 16 Taylor dancers costumed in black as they weave in and out of intricate patterns that mirror the way varied emotions weave themselves through life. This will be an evening of breathtaking dance and music. “The American spirit soars whenever Taylor’s dancers dance.” –San Francisco Chronicle http://www.ptamd.org/main/about-ptamd/ptdc/ https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=blq1BNhyyVg Residency The Paul Taylor Dance Company and Taylor 2 will be in residence on the grounds of Chautauqua Institution August 6–10. Taylor 2 will be presenting over ten residency activities and classes that will delight community members throughout the week. Be looking for Taylor Movement Classes offered through Special Studies, mini-performances, open rehearsals, a pre-concert chat and more! http://www.ptamd.org/main/about-ptamd/taylor-2/
Morning Devotional: Rev. Dr. Mary Luti    Amphitheater
A native of Boston, MA, Mary Luti is a pastor and teacher ordained in the United Church of Christ, retired as a seminary educator and administrator. After many years as a member of a Roman Catholic women’s community, with assignments in Rome, Madrid, and Mexico City, Mary returned to Boston and earned a PhD in theology in the Jesuit faculty of Boston College, Chestnut Hill, MA. From 1984-1998, she taught the history of Christian Life and Thought at Andover Newton Theological School in Newton Centre, MA (now Andover Newton Seminary at Yale). During this period, she also served as Director of the school’s Center for the Ministry of the Laity and as Associate Dean for Academic Programs. After serving two years as a consultant for congregational development at South Church, UCC, in Springfield, MA, she was called in 2000 to serve as senior minister of the historic First Church in Cambridge, Congregational, in Harvard Square, the 16th minister and the sole woman pastor in the community’s 382 years of continuing life. After an intense period of congregational renewal at First Church, she returned to Andover Newton in 2008 as Visiting Professor of Worship and Preaching and was appointed first Director of the newly inaugurated Wilson Chapel. A sought-after conference speaker, workshop leader and preacher, she was recognized with the outstanding teaching award of the United Church of Christ at its 2011 General Synod. Dr. Luti is the author of Teresa of Avila’s Way, a volume in the series, “The Way of the Christian Mystics” (Liturgical Press), and numerous other publications on topics of the Christian life and practice. A longtime member of the UCC’s Stillspeaking Writers Group, Mary is well-known to many in the denomination and beyond for her regular contributions to the UCC’s online Daily Devotional. She has also pastored several Boston area churches during sabbatical and interim periods, most recently at the Wellesley Congregational Church in Wellesley, MA. Mary is a founding member of The Daughters of Abraham, a national network of interfaith women’s book groups formed after 9/11 whose mission is to provide a replicable grassroots platform for greater understanding, respect, and reconciliation among women of the Abrahamic faiths. (www.daughtersofabraham.com). In retirement, Mary continues to teach, offer workshops, and preach about all the ways people of faith have sung, prayed, preached, shaped communities, and handed on the meaningful traditions of the Christian Church. She and her spouse also organize and lead small group study tours and retreats to southern Spain, Jerusalem, and Assisi that help participants connect great figures and movements of the past with current questions of faith, spirituality and social concern. She lives with her spouse, the Rev. Dr. Anne M. Minton, a retired college professor and Episcopal priest, in a restored textile mill on the Merrimack River in Lowell, MA, the historic city that catapulted the nation into a new industrial era in the early 19th century. Both Mary and Anne are irrationally devoted fans of the Boston Red Sox.
Morning Lecture: Robin Wright; Fellow, Woodrow Wilson Inte..    Amphitheater
A contributing writer to The New Yorker and a fellow at the Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars, Robin Wright has covered a dozen wars and several revolutions, reporting from more than 140 countries on all seven continents for numerous publications, including The Washington Post, The New York Times Magazine, TIME, The Atlantic, The Sunday Times of London, and Foreign Affairs. Wright’s first piece on Iran won the National Magazine Award for best reporting. She has also received the U.N. Correspondents Association Gold Medal for international coverage, and the Overseas Press Club Award for the “best reporting in any medium requiring exceptional courage and initia­tive,” for her coverage of African wars. The American Academy of Diplomacy named her journalist of the year for “distinguished reporting and analysis of international affairs.” She also won the National Press Club Award for diplomatic reporting and has been the recipient of a MacArthur Foundation grant. She has been a fellow at the Brookings Institution and the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace. Wright is the author of several books, including Dreams and Shadows: The Future of the Middle East, which was selected by The New York Times and The Washington Post as one of the most notable books of 2008. Her 2011 book, Rock the Casbah: Rage and Rebellion Across the Islamic World, was selected as the best book on international affairs by the Overseas Press Club.
Morning Devotional: Rev. Dr. Mary Luti    Amphitheater
A native of Boston, MA, Mary Luti is a pastor and teacher ordained in the United Church of Christ, retired as a seminary educator and administrator. After many years as a member of a Roman Catholic women’s community, with assignments in Rome, Madrid, and Mexico City, Mary returned to Boston and earned a PhD in theology in the Jesuit faculty of Boston College, Chestnut Hill, MA. From 1984-1998, she taught the history of Christian Life and Thought at Andover Newton Theological School in Newton Centre, MA (now Andover Newton Seminary at Yale). During this period, she also served as Director of the school’s Center for the Ministry of the Laity and as Associate Dean for Academic Programs. After serving two years as a consultant for congregational development at South Church, UCC, in Springfield, MA, she was called in 2000 to serve as senior minister of the historic First Church in Cambridge, Congregational, in Harvard Square, the 16th minister and the sole woman pastor in the community’s 382 years of continuing life. After an intense period of congregational renewal at First Church, she returned to Andover Newton in 2008 as Visiting Professor of Worship and Preaching and was appointed first Director of the newly inaugurated Wilson Chapel. A sought-after conference speaker, workshop leader and preacher, she was recognized with the outstanding teaching award of the United Church of Christ at its 2011 General Synod. Dr. Luti is the author of Teresa of Avila’s Way, a volume in the series, “The Way of the Christian Mystics” (Liturgical Press), and numerous other publications on topics of the Christian life and practice. A longtime member of the UCC’s Stillspeaking Writers Group, Mary is well-known to many in the denomination and beyond for her regular contributions to the UCC’s online Daily Devotional. She has also pastored several Boston area churches during sabbatical and interim periods, most recently at the Wellesley Congregational Church in Wellesley, MA. Mary is a founding member of The Daughters of Abraham, a national network of interfaith women’s book groups formed after 9/11 whose mission is to provide a replicable grassroots platform for greater understanding, respect, and reconciliation among women of the Abrahamic faiths. (www.daughtersofabraham.com). In retirement, Mary continues to teach, offer workshops, and preach about all the ways people of faith have sung, prayed, preached, shaped communities, and handed on the meaningful traditions of the Christian Church. She and her spouse also organize and lead small group study tours and retreats to southern Spain, Jerusalem, and Assisi that help participants connect great figures and movements of the past with current questions of faith, spirituality and social concern. She lives with her spouse, the Rev. Dr. Anne M. Minton, a retired college professor and Episcopal priest, in a restored textile mill on the Merrimack River in Lowell, MA, the historic city that catapulted the nation into a new industrial era in the early 19th century. Both Mary and Anne are irrationally devoted fans of the Boston Red Sox.
Morning Devotional: Rev. Dr. Mary Luti    Amphitheater
A native of Boston, MA, Mary Luti is a pastor and teacher ordained in the United Church of Christ, retired as a seminary educator and administrator. After many years as a member of a Roman Catholic women’s community, with assignments in Rome, Madrid, and Mexico City, Mary returned to Boston and earned a PhD in theology in the Jesuit faculty of Boston College, Chestnut Hill, MA. From 1984-1998, she taught the history of Christian Life and Thought at Andover Newton Theological School in Newton Centre, MA (now Andover Newton Seminary at Yale). During this period, she also served as Director of the school’s Center for the Ministry of the Laity and as Associate Dean for Academic Programs. After serving two years as a consultant for congregational development at South Church, UCC, in Springfield, MA, she was called in 2000 to serve as senior minister of the historic First Church in Cambridge, Congregational, in Harvard Square, the 16th minister and the sole woman pastor in the community’s 382 years of continuing life. After an intense period of congregational renewal at First Church, she returned to Andover Newton in 2008 as Visiting Professor of Worship and Preaching and was appointed first Director of the newly inaugurated Wilson Chapel. A sought-after conference speaker, workshop leader and preacher, she was recognized with the outstanding teaching award of the United Church of Christ at its 2011 General Synod. Dr. Luti is the author of Teresa of Avila’s Way, a volume in the series, “The Way of the Christian Mystics” (Liturgical Press), and numerous other publications on topics of the Christian life and practice. A longtime member of the UCC’s Stillspeaking Writers Group, Mary is well-known to many in the denomination and beyond for her regular contributions to the UCC’s online Daily Devotional. She has also pastored several Boston area churches during sabbatical and interim periods, most recently at the Wellesley Congregational Church in Wellesley, MA. Mary is a founding member of The Daughters of Abraham, a national network of interfaith women’s book groups formed after 9/11 whose mission is to provide a replicable grassroots platform for greater understanding, respect, and reconciliation among women of the Abrahamic faiths. (www.daughtersofabraham.com). In retirement, Mary continues to teach, offer workshops, and preach about all the ways people of faith have sung, prayed, preached, shaped communities, and handed on the meaningful traditions of the Christian Church. She and her spouse also organize and lead small group study tours and retreats to southern Spain, Jerusalem, and Assisi that help participants connect great figures and movements of the past with current questions of faith, spirituality and social concern. She lives with her spouse, the Rev. Dr. Anne M. Minton, a retired college professor and Episcopal priest, in a restored textile mill on the Merrimack River in Lowell, MA, the historic city that catapulted the nation into a new industrial era in the early 19th century. Both Mary and Anne are irrationally devoted fans of the Boston Red Sox.
Morning Lecture: Joi Ito; director, MIT Media Lab    Amphitheater
Joi Ito is an activist, entrepreneur, venture capitalist and scholar focusing on the ethics and governance of technology, tackling complex problems such as climate change, societal inequity and redesigning the systems that support scholarship and science. As director of the MIT Media Lab and a Professor of the Practice in Media Arts and Sciences, he supports researchers at the Media Lab to deploy design, science, and technology such AI, cryptography, and synthetic biology to transform society in substantial and positive ways. Ito is a member of the 2017 class of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences and a Visiting Professor of Law from Practice at the Harvard Law School, where he and Jonathan Zittrain teach ethics and governance of artificial intelligence. Ito is chairman of the board of PureTech Health and was previously the board chair and chief executive of Creative Commons. He serves on the boards of the John S. and James L. Knight Foundation, the John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation, and The New York Times Company. In Japan, he was a founder of Digital Garage and helped establish and later became CEO of the country's first commercial Internet service provider. Among his honors are a Lifetime Achievement Award from the Oxford Internet Institute and the IRI Medal. He is co-author of Whiplash: How to Survive Our Faster Future, and writes a monthly column for WIRED magazine. Ito earned a PhD from Keio University Graduate School of Media and Governance; he also currently serves as a distinguished researcher at the Keio Research Institute at SFC's Internet and Society Laboratory.
Morning Devotional: Rev. Dr. Mary Luti    Amphitheater
A native of Boston, MA, Mary Luti is a pastor and teacher ordained in the United Church of Christ, retired as a seminary educator and administrator. After many years as a member of a Roman Catholic women’s community, with assignments in Rome, Madrid, and Mexico City, Mary returned to Boston and earned a PhD in theology in the Jesuit faculty of Boston College, Chestnut Hill, MA. From 1984-1998, she taught the history of Christian Life and Thought at Andover Newton Theological School in Newton Centre, MA (now Andover Newton Seminary at Yale). During this period, she also served as Director of the school’s Center for the Ministry of the Laity and as Associate Dean for Academic Programs. After serving two years as a consultant for congregational development at South Church, UCC, in Springfield, MA, she was called in 2000 to serve as senior minister of the historic First Church in Cambridge, Congregational, in Harvard Square, the 16th minister and the sole woman pastor in the community’s 382 years of continuing life. After an intense period of congregational renewal at First Church, she returned to Andover Newton in 2008 as Visiting Professor of Worship and Preaching and was appointed first Director of the newly inaugurated Wilson Chapel. A sought-after conference speaker, workshop leader and preacher, she was recognized with the outstanding teaching award of the United Church of Christ at its 2011 General Synod. Dr. Luti is the author of Teresa of Avila’s Way, a volume in the series, “The Way of the Christian Mystics” (Liturgical Press), and numerous other publications on topics of the Christian life and practice. A longtime member of the UCC’s Stillspeaking Writers Group, Mary is well-known to many in the denomination and beyond for her regular contributions to the UCC’s online Daily Devotional. She has also pastored several Boston area churches during sabbatical and interim periods, most recently at the Wellesley Congregational Church in Wellesley, MA. Mary is a founding member of The Daughters of Abraham, a national network of interfaith women’s book groups formed after 9/11 whose mission is to provide a replicable grassroots platform for greater understanding, respect, and reconciliation among women of the Abrahamic faiths. (www.daughtersofabraham.com). In retirement, Mary continues to teach, offer workshops, and preach about all the ways people of faith have sung, prayed, preached, shaped communities, and handed on the meaningful traditions of the Christian Church. She and her spouse also organize and lead small group study tours and retreats to southern Spain, Jerusalem, and Assisi that help participants connect great figures and movements of the past with current questions of faith, spirituality and social concern. She lives with her spouse, the Rev. Dr. Anne M. Minton, a retired college professor and Episcopal priest, in a restored textile mill on the Merrimack River in Lowell, MA, the historic city that catapulted the nation into a new industrial era in the early 19th century. Both Mary and Anne are irrationally devoted fans of the Boston Red Sox.
Morning Lecture: Bill McKibben; co-founder, 350.org    Amphitheater
Bill McKibben is an author, environmentalist and co-founder of anti-carbon campaign group 350.org, the first planet-wide, grassroots climate change movement, which has organized twenty thousand rallies around the world in every country save North Korea, spearheaded the resistance to the Keystone Pipeline, and launched the fast-growing fossil fuel divestment movement. McKibben is the author of more than a dozen books, including 1989’s The End of Nature, regarded as the first book for a general audience on climate change. Currently, McKibben is the Schumann Distinguished Scholar in Environmental Studies at Middlebury College and a fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences. In 2014, he was awarded the Right Livelihood Prize, sometimes referred to as the “alternative Nobel.” Other honors and awards include Guggenheim and Lyndhurst fellowships; a Lannan Literary Award; a Gandhi Peace Award; a Thomas Merton Prize; a John Muir Award; and the Sam Rose and Julie Walters Prize for Global Environmental Activism at Dickinson College. In accepting that prize, he told the graduating Dickinson students that global climate change is the greatest challenge that has ever confronted human society. A former staff writer for The New Yorker, he writes frequently for a wide variety of publications, including the New York Review of Books, National Geographic, and Rolling Stone. In 2014, biologists honored him by naming a new species of woodland gnat — Megophthalmidia mckibbeni — in his honor.
Morning Devotional: Rev. Dr. Mary Luti    Amphitheater
A native of Boston, MA, Mary Luti is a pastor and teacher ordained in the United Church of Christ, retired as a seminary educator and administrator. After many years as a member of a Roman Catholic women’s community, with assignments in Rome, Madrid, and Mexico City, Mary returned to Boston and earned a PhD in theology in the Jesuit faculty of Boston College, Chestnut Hill, MA. From 1984-1998, she taught the history of Christian Life and Thought at Andover Newton Theological School in Newton Centre, MA (now Andover Newton Seminary at Yale). During this period, she also served as Director of the school’s Center for the Ministry of the Laity and as Associate Dean for Academic Programs. After serving two years as a consultant for congregational development at South Church, UCC, in Springfield, MA, she was called in 2000 to serve as senior minister of the historic First Church in Cambridge, Congregational, in Harvard Square, the 16th minister and the sole woman pastor in the community’s 382 years of continuing life. After an intense period of congregational renewal at First Church, she returned to Andover Newton in 2008 as Visiting Professor of Worship and Preaching and was appointed first Director of the newly inaugurated Wilson Chapel. A sought-after conference speaker, workshop leader and preacher, she was recognized with the outstanding teaching award of the United Church of Christ at its 2011 General Synod. Dr. Luti is the author of Teresa of Avila’s Way, a volume in the series, “The Way of the Christian Mystics” (Liturgical Press), and numerous other publications on topics of the Christian life and practice. A longtime member of the UCC’s Stillspeaking Writers Group, Mary is well-known to many in the denomination and beyond for her regular contributions to the UCC’s online Daily Devotional. She has also pastored several Boston area churches during sabbatical and interim periods, most recently at the Wellesley Congregational Church in Wellesley, MA. Mary is a founding member of The Daughters of Abraham, a national network of interfaith women’s book groups formed after 9/11 whose mission is to provide a replicable grassroots platform for greater understanding, respect, and reconciliation among women of the Abrahamic faiths. (www.daughtersofabraham.com). In retirement, Mary continues to teach, offer workshops, and preach about all the ways people of faith have sung, prayed, preached, shaped communities, and handed on the meaningful traditions of the Christian Church. She and her spouse also organize and lead small group study tours and retreats to southern Spain, Jerusalem, and Assisi that help participants connect great figures and movements of the past with current questions of faith, spirituality and social concern. She lives with her spouse, the Rev. Dr. Anne M. Minton, a retired college professor and Episcopal priest, in a restored textile mill on the Merrimack River in Lowell, MA, the historic city that catapulted the nation into a new industrial era in the early 19th century. Both Mary and Anne are irrationally devoted fans of the Boston Red Sox.
Morning Lecture: Tarana J. Burke; founder, “Me Too” Mo..    Amphitheater
For more than 25 years, Tarana J. Burke has worked at the intersection of racial justice, arts and culture and sexual violence. Fueled by commitments to interrupt sexual violence and other systemic inequalities disproportionately impacting marginalized people, particularly black women and girls, Burke has created and led various campaigns focused on increasing access to resources and support for impacted communities, including the “Me Too” Movement. Burke began her professional life in Selma, where, over the span of a decade, she assisted the organization 21st Century Youth Leadership Movement; served as a curator and consultant at the National Voting Rights Museum and Institute; played a role in the annual commemoration of the Selma Voting Rights Struggle and of the events leading up to the 1965 march from Selma to Montgomery; and served as the executive director of the Black Belt Arts and Cultural Center. In 2003 she co-founded Just Be Inc., an organization committed to the leadership development and wellness of black girls. Burke realized how many were suffering through abuse without access to resources, safe spaces and support; the “Me Too” Movement was born out of the need to fill that void. The movement quickly expanded beyond young people to include adult women and men, queer and trans folks and all marginalized groups. In October 2017 #metoo became a viral phenomenon that quickly spread around the world. Tarana was named Time’s 2017 Person of the Year along with the “Silence Breakers,” a group recognized for standing up against sexual harassment and violence. In 2018, she was featured on the covers of Time as one of the 100 most influential people in the world and Variety’s Power of Women issue. She has received the Ridenhour Prize and The Change Makers Award from Black Girls Rock, and topped the The Root 100 list as the most influential African American in 2018.
Sunday Morning Worship: Miguel De La Torre    Amphitheater
Born in Cuba months before the Castro Revolution, Miguel De La Torre and his family came to the United States as refugees when he was six months old. At the age of nineteen, he began a real estate company in Miami, Florida, and became active in local politics, at one point a candidate for the Florida House of Representatives. The company was a financial success. Convicted by the biblical passage concerning the “Rich Young Ruler (Luke 18),” however, De La Torre dissolved his thirteen-year-old firm and attended Southern Baptist Theological Seminary in order to obtain a Masters in Divinity. During his seminary training he served as pastor to a rural congregation. Lacking opportunities within the church structure due to ethnic discrimination, however, De La Torre continued his theological training and obtained a doctoral. The focus of his academic pursuit was social ethics within contemporary U.S. thought, specifically how religion affects race, class, and gender oppression. He specialized in applying a social scientific approach to Latino/a religiosity within this country, Liberation theologies in the Caribbean and Latin America, and postmodern/postcolonial social theory. De La Torre is one of the most (if not the most) prolific contemporary Latinx religion scholars. Since obtaining his doctoral in 1999, Dr. Miguel De La Torre has authored several hundred articles and over thirty-two books, including the national award-winning Reading the Bible from the Margins, (Orbis, 2002); Santería: The Beliefs and Rituals of a Growing Religion in America (Wm. B. Eerdmans, 2004); Doing Christian Ethics from the Margins, (Orbis, 2004); and the two-volume Encyclopedia on Hispanic American Religious Cultures (ABC-CLIO, 2009). He presently serves as Professor of Social Ethics and Latinx Studies at Iliff School of Theology in Denver. Within the academy he is a past-director to the American Academy of Religion, 2012 and served as co-chair of its Ethics Section; President of the Society of Christian Ethics, and the Executive Officer (and cofounder) of the Society of Race, Ethnicity and Religion. Additionally, he is the founding editor of the “Journal of Race, Ethnicity, and Religion.” A scholar-activist, Dr. De La Torre has written numerous articles in popular media, https://ourlucha.wordpress.com/ and has served on several civic organizations. De La Torre received a Fulbright Specialists Scholarship allowing him to teach at Gadjah Mada University in Indonesia during the summer of 2012. He has also taught classes at Johannesburg University in South Africa (Fall 2014) and Johannes Gutenberg University in Mainz, Germany (Fall 2015). He recently received a Louisville Institute Grant that will allow him to do research in Cuba for an upcoming book on the Political Theology of José Martí.
Morning Devotional: Miguel De La Torre    Amphitheater
Born in Cuba months before the Castro Revolution, Miguel De La Torre and his family came to the United States as refugees when he was six months old. At the age of nineteen, he began a real estate company in Miami, Florida, and became active in local politics, at one point a candidate for the Florida House of Representatives. The company was a financial success. Convicted by the biblical passage concerning the “Rich Young Ruler (Luke 18),” however, De La Torre dissolved his thirteen-year-old firm and attended Southern Baptist Theological Seminary in order to obtain a Masters in Divinity. During his seminary training he served as pastor to a rural congregation. Lacking opportunities within the church structure due to ethnic discrimination, however, De La Torre continued his theological training and obtained a doctoral. The focus of his academic pursuit was social ethics within contemporary U.S. thought, specifically how religion affects race, class, and gender oppression. He specialized in applying a social scientific approach to Latino/a religiosity within this country, Liberation theologies in the Caribbean and Latin America, and postmodern/postcolonial social theory. De La Torre is one of the most (if not the most) prolific contemporary Latinx religion scholars. Since obtaining his doctoral in 1999, Dr. Miguel De La Torre has authored several hundred articles and over thirty-two books, including the national award-winning Reading the Bible from the Margins, (Orbis, 2002); Santería: The Beliefs and Rituals of a Growing Religion in America (Wm. B. Eerdmans, 2004); Doing Christian Ethics from the Margins, (Orbis, 2004); and the two-volume Encyclopedia on Hispanic American Religious Cultures (ABC-CLIO, 2009). He presently serves as Professor of Social Ethics and Latinx Studies at Iliff School of Theology in Denver. Within the academy he is a past-director to the American Academy of Religion, 2012 and served as co-chair of its Ethics Section; President of the Society of Christian Ethics, and the Executive Officer (and cofounder) of the Society of Race, Ethnicity and Religion. Additionally, he is the founding editor of the “Journal of Race, Ethnicity, and Religion.” A scholar-activist, Dr. De La Torre has written numerous articles in popular media, https://ourlucha.wordpress.com/ and has served on several civic organizations. De La Torre received a Fulbright Specialists Scholarship allowing him to teach at Gadjah Mada University in Indonesia during the summer of 2012. He has also taught classes at Johannesburg University in South Africa (Fall 2014) and Johannes Gutenberg University in Mainz, Germany (Fall 2015). He recently received a Louisville Institute Grant that will allow him to do research in Cuba for an upcoming book on the Political Theology of José Martí.
Morning Lecture: Wynton Marsalis, managing and artistic di..    Amphitheater
Wynton Marsalis Managing and artistic director, Jazz at Lincoln Center World-renowned trumpeter and composer 10:45 a.m. Monday, August 19 & Friday, August 23, 2019 Wynton Marsalis returns to Chautauqua to open and close a week on "Exploring Race and Culture in America with Wynton Marsalis and Jazz at Lincoln Center." Through a Monday morning lecture, performances with the Jazz at Lincoln Center Orchestra throughout the week — including the second-ever performance of The Ever Fonky Lowdown — and a Friday morning Amphitheater conversation, Marsalis will convey his hopes, concerns, and insights about contemporary culture and society through a historically informed lens. An internationally acclaimed musician, composer, bandleader, educator and a leading advocate of American culture, at 17, Marsalis became the youngest musician ever to be admitted to Tanglewood’s Berkshire Music Center. Since then, he attended Juilliard, performed 120 concerts a year for 15 consecutive years, produced more than 80 records and won nine Grammy Awards, two George Foster Peabody Awards and an Emmy Award. He is also the first jazz musician to win the Pulitzer Prize for Music. In 1987, Marsalis co-founded the jazz program at Lincoln Center. Today, Jazz at Lincoln Center presents rich and diverse programming that includes concerts, debates, film forums, dances, television and radio broadcasts and educational activities. Marsalis has been the recipient of countless honors around the world, including the Netherlands’ Edison Award, the Grand Prix Du Disque of France, and honorary membership to England’s Royal Academy of Music. The French Ministry of Culture appointed Marsalis to the rank of Knight in the Order of Arts and Literature. He also received France’s highest distinction, the insignia Chevalier of the Legion of Honor. In the United States, he has received a National Medal of the Arts, the Louis Armstrong Memorial Medal, the Frederick Douglass Medallion from the New York Urban League and an Arts Education Award from the American Arts Council. In 2001 was appointed as a United Nations Messenger of Peace. Marsalis has received nearly three dozen honorary degrees and awards from colleges and universities across the country, most recently the President’s Award at Hunter College in 2014.
Morning Devotional: Miguel De La Torre    Amphitheater
Born in Cuba months before the Castro Revolution, Miguel De La Torre and his family came to the United States as refugees when he was six months old. At the age of nineteen, he began a real estate company in Miami, Florida, and became active in local politics, at one point a candidate for the Florida House of Representatives. The company was a financial success. Convicted by the biblical passage concerning the “Rich Young Ruler (Luke 18),” however, De La Torre dissolved his thirteen-year-old firm and attended Southern Baptist Theological Seminary in order to obtain a Masters in Divinity. During his seminary training he served as pastor to a rural congregation. Lacking opportunities within the church structure due to ethnic discrimination, however, De La Torre continued his theological training and obtained a doctoral. The focus of his academic pursuit was social ethics within contemporary U.S. thought, specifically how religion affects race, class, and gender oppression. He specialized in applying a social scientific approach to Latino/a religiosity within this country, Liberation theologies in the Caribbean and Latin America, and postmodern/postcolonial social theory. De La Torre is one of the most (if not the most) prolific contemporary Latinx religion scholars. Since obtaining his doctoral in 1999, Dr. Miguel De La Torre has authored several hundred articles and over thirty-two books, including the national award-winning Reading the Bible from the Margins, (Orbis, 2002); Santería: The Beliefs and Rituals of a Growing Religion in America (Wm. B. Eerdmans, 2004); Doing Christian Ethics from the Margins, (Orbis, 2004); and the two-volume Encyclopedia on Hispanic American Religious Cultures (ABC-CLIO, 2009). He presently serves as Professor of Social Ethics and Latinx Studies at Iliff School of Theology in Denver. Within the academy he is a past-director to the American Academy of Religion, 2012 and served as co-chair of its Ethics Section; President of the Society of Christian Ethics, and the Executive Officer (and cofounder) of the Society of Race, Ethnicity and Religion. Additionally, he is the founding editor of the “Journal of Race, Ethnicity, and Religion.” A scholar-activist, Dr. De La Torre has written numerous articles in popular media, https://ourlucha.wordpress.com/ and has served on several civic organizations. De La Torre received a Fulbright Specialists Scholarship allowing him to teach at Gadjah Mada University in Indonesia during the summer of 2012. He has also taught classes at Johannesburg University in South Africa (Fall 2014) and Johannes Gutenberg University in Mainz, Germany (Fall 2015). He recently received a Louisville Institute Grant that will allow him to do research in Cuba for an upcoming book on the Political Theology of José Martí.
Morning Lecture: Sarah Lewis; author, ; guest ed..    Amphitheater
Sarah Lewis, a scholar and author of The Rise: Creativity, the Gift of Failure, and the Search for Mastery, sparked national conversation with “Vision & Justice” — the landmark issue of Aperture dedicated to photography of the black experience that explores, with eloquent reach, “what humanity looks like,” and how when we view race and justice through the lens of culture, we can enlarge our notion of citizenship, of who belongs and who counts. Lewis’ work at Aperture won the prestigious Infinity Prize from the International Center of Photography, and is required reading at New York University’s Tisch School. Recently, it became one of Harvard’s core “general education” curriculum classes, with Lewis speaking to packed lecture halls about the role of art and artists to reshape our understanding of social justice, even history. Lewis is an assistant professor at Harvard, in the Departments of History of Art and Architecture and African and African American Studies. She has spoken on the TED main stage, at SXSW, appeared on Oprah’s “Power List,” served on President Barack Obama’s Arts Policy Committee, and been profiled in Vogue. She has held positions at Yale’s School of Art, the Tate Modern, and the Museum of Modern Art in New York. Lewis’ essays have been published in Artforum and The Smithsonian, and her book on Frederick Douglass is forthcoming from Harvard University Press. Lewis received her Bachelor of Arts from Harvard University, her Masters of Philosophy from Oxford, and her Ph.D. from Yale.
Morning Devotional: Miguel De La Torre    Amphitheater
Born in Cuba months before the Castro Revolution, Miguel De La Torre and his family came to the United States as refugees when he was six months old. At the age of nineteen, he began a real estate company in Miami, Florida, and became active in local politics, at one point a candidate for the Florida House of Representatives. The company was a financial success. Convicted by the biblical passage concerning the “Rich Young Ruler (Luke 18),” however, De La Torre dissolved his thirteen-year-old firm and attended Southern Baptist Theological Seminary in order to obtain a Masters in Divinity. During his seminary training he served as pastor to a rural congregation. Lacking opportunities within the church structure due to ethnic discrimination, however, De La Torre continued his theological training and obtained a doctoral. The focus of his academic pursuit was social ethics within contemporary U.S. thought, specifically how religion affects race, class, and gender oppression. He specialized in applying a social scientific approach to Latino/a religiosity within this country, Liberation theologies in the Caribbean and Latin America, and postmodern/postcolonial social theory. De La Torre is one of the most (if not the most) prolific contemporary Latinx religion scholars. Since obtaining his doctoral in 1999, Dr. Miguel De La Torre has authored several hundred articles and over thirty-two books, including the national award-winning Reading the Bible from the Margins, (Orbis, 2002); Santería: The Beliefs and Rituals of a Growing Religion in America (Wm. B. Eerdmans, 2004); Doing Christian Ethics from the Margins, (Orbis, 2004); and the two-volume Encyclopedia on Hispanic American Religious Cultures (ABC-CLIO, 2009). He presently serves as Professor of Social Ethics and Latinx Studies at Iliff School of Theology in Denver. Within the academy he is a past-director to the American Academy of Religion, 2012 and served as co-chair of its Ethics Section; President of the Society of Christian Ethics, and the Executive Officer (and cofounder) of the Society of Race, Ethnicity and Religion. Additionally, he is the founding editor of the “Journal of Race, Ethnicity, and Religion.” A scholar-activist, Dr. De La Torre has written numerous articles in popular media, https://ourlucha.wordpress.com/ and has served on several civic organizations. De La Torre received a Fulbright Specialists Scholarship allowing him to teach at Gadjah Mada University in Indonesia during the summer of 2012. He has also taught classes at Johannesburg University in South Africa (Fall 2014) and Johannes Gutenberg University in Mainz, Germany (Fall 2015). He recently received a Louisville Institute Grant that will allow him to do research in Cuba for an upcoming book on the Political Theology of José Martí.
Morning Lecture: Bird Runningwater, director, Sundance Ins..    Amphitheater
Bird Runningwater serves as the director of Sundance Institute’s Native American and Indigenous Program, overseeing the Native Filmmakers Lab, the Native Producers Fellowship, the Sundance Film Festival’s Native Forum, the Full Circle Initiative and was recently appointed to co-lead the Institute’s Outreach and Inclusion work across all programs. Under Runningwater’s tenure, 140 different Indigenous filmmakers have been mentored and supported through Sundance, and more than 110 films written, directed and produced by Indigenous filmmakers have been curated by Runningwater to premiere at Sundance Film Festival. Runningwater currently serves on the Comcast/NBCUniversal Joint Diversity Council and on the Board of Directors of the First Peoples Fund; he is also a past member of the Board of Jurors for the George Foster Peabody Awards, and has served on competition juries for film festivals around the world. In Time magazine’s 2019 Optimist Issue, he was listed among “12 Leaders Who Are Shaping the Next Generation of Artists,” and he is a recipient of the Woodrow Wilson Foundation’s National Fellowship in Public Policy and International Affairs. Before joining Sundance Institute, Runningwater served as executive director of the Fund of the Four Directions, and as program associate in the Ford Foundation’s Media, Arts, and Culture Program. A citizen of the Cheyenne and Mescalero Apache Tribes, he is a graduate of the University of Oklahoma with degrees in journalism and Native American Studies, and he received his Master of Public Affairs degree from the University of Texas at Austin’s Lyndon B. Johnson School of Public Affairs.
Morning Devotional: Miguel De La Torre    Amphitheater
Born in Cuba months before the Castro Revolution, Miguel De La Torre and his family came to the United States as refugees when he was six months old. At the age of nineteen, he began a real estate company in Miami, Florida, and became active in local politics, at one point a candidate for the Florida House of Representatives. The company was a financial success. Convicted by the biblical passage concerning the “Rich Young Ruler (Luke 18),” however, De La Torre dissolved his thirteen-year-old firm and attended Southern Baptist Theological Seminary in order to obtain a Masters in Divinity. During his seminary training he served as pastor to a rural congregation. Lacking opportunities within the church structure due to ethnic discrimination, however, De La Torre continued his theological training and obtained a doctoral. The focus of his academic pursuit was social ethics within contemporary U.S. thought, specifically how religion affects race, class, and gender oppression. He specialized in applying a social scientific approach to Latino/a religiosity within this country, Liberation theologies in the Caribbean and Latin America, and postmodern/postcolonial social theory. De La Torre is one of the most (if not the most) prolific contemporary Latinx religion scholars. Since obtaining his doctoral in 1999, Dr. Miguel De La Torre has authored several hundred articles and over thirty-two books, including the national award-winning Reading the Bible from the Margins, (Orbis, 2002); Santería: The Beliefs and Rituals of a Growing Religion in America (Wm. B. Eerdmans, 2004); Doing Christian Ethics from the Margins, (Orbis, 2004); and the two-volume Encyclopedia on Hispanic American Religious Cultures (ABC-CLIO, 2009). He presently serves as Professor of Social Ethics and Latinx Studies at Iliff School of Theology in Denver. Within the academy he is a past-director to the American Academy of Religion, 2012 and served as co-chair of its Ethics Section; President of the Society of Christian Ethics, and the Executive Officer (and cofounder) of the Society of Race, Ethnicity and Religion. Additionally, he is the founding editor of the “Journal of Race, Ethnicity, and Religion.” A scholar-activist, Dr. De La Torre has written numerous articles in popular media, https://ourlucha.wordpress.com/ and has served on several civic organizations. De La Torre received a Fulbright Specialists Scholarship allowing him to teach at Gadjah Mada University in Indonesia during the summer of 2012. He has also taught classes at Johannesburg University in South Africa (Fall 2014) and Johannes Gutenberg University in Mainz, Germany (Fall 2015). He recently received a Louisville Institute Grant that will allow him to do research in Cuba for an upcoming book on the Political Theology of José Martí.
Morning Lecture: Ariana A. Curtis, curator, Latinx Studies..    Amphitheater
Ariana A. Curtis is the first curator of Latinx Studies at the Smithsonian National Museum of African American History and Culture. She is responsible for museum research and collections related to: U.S. Latinx, U.S. Afro-Latinx, African American & Latinx, African Diaspora, and African American migration to and engagement in Latin America. Additionally, Curtis serves on multiple committees for the Smithsonian American Women’s History Initiative. Among her many conference presentations and keynote addresses, Ariana has spoken at SXSW, Ted Women 2018, Afro-Latin Talks, and Politico Women Rule. She has published in The Public Historian, the anthology Pan African Spaces: Essays in Black Transnationalism, and contributed to a forthcoming women’s history book from Smithsonian Books. Previously, Curtis was curator of Latino Studies at the Smithsonian Anacostia Community Museum. In addition to leading Latinx-centered public programming, she curated two bilingual exhibitions: “Gateways/Portales,” which received honorable mention in the 2017 Smithsonian Excellence in Exhibition Awards and “Bridging the Americas,” which was exhibited both in Washington, D.C. and in Panama City, Panama. She also organized Revisiting Our Black Mosaic, a 2014 symposium about race and immigration in the Washington, D.C. metro area. Curtis is a Fulbright scholar with a doctorate in anthropology (race, gender, and social justice) from American University, a masters in public anthropology from American University, and a bachelor’s from Duke University.
Morning Devotional: Miguel De La Torre    Amphitheater
Born in Cuba months before the Castro Revolution, Miguel De La Torre and his family came to the United States as refugees when he was six months old. At the age of nineteen, he began a real estate company in Miami, Florida, and became active in local politics, at one point a candidate for the Florida House of Representatives. The company was a financial success. Convicted by the biblical passage concerning the “Rich Young Ruler (Luke 18),” however, De La Torre dissolved his thirteen-year-old firm and attended Southern Baptist Theological Seminary in order to obtain a Masters in Divinity. During his seminary training he served as pastor to a rural congregation. Lacking opportunities within the church structure due to ethnic discrimination, however, De La Torre continued his theological training and obtained a doctoral. The focus of his academic pursuit was social ethics within contemporary U.S. thought, specifically how religion affects race, class, and gender oppression. He specialized in applying a social scientific approach to Latino/a religiosity within this country, Liberation theologies in the Caribbean and Latin America, and postmodern/postcolonial social theory. De La Torre is one of the most (if not the most) prolific contemporary Latinx religion scholars. Since obtaining his doctoral in 1999, Dr. Miguel De La Torre has authored several hundred articles and over thirty-two books, including the national award-winning Reading the Bible from the Margins, (Orbis, 2002); Santería: The Beliefs and Rituals of a Growing Religion in America (Wm. B. Eerdmans, 2004); Doing Christian Ethics from the Margins, (Orbis, 2004); and the two-volume Encyclopedia on Hispanic American Religious Cultures (ABC-CLIO, 2009). He presently serves as Professor of Social Ethics and Latinx Studies at Iliff School of Theology in Denver. Within the academy he is a past-director to the American Academy of Religion, 2012 and served as co-chair of its Ethics Section; President of the Society of Christian Ethics, and the Executive Officer (and cofounder) of the Society of Race, Ethnicity and Religion. Additionally, he is the founding editor of the “Journal of Race, Ethnicity, and Religion.” A scholar-activist, Dr. De La Torre has written numerous articles in popular media, https://ourlucha.wordpress.com/ and has served on several civic organizations. De La Torre received a Fulbright Specialists Scholarship allowing him to teach at Gadjah Mada University in Indonesia during the summer of 2012. He has also taught classes at Johannesburg University in South Africa (Fall 2014) and Johannes Gutenberg University in Mainz, Germany (Fall 2015). He recently received a Louisville Institute Grant that will allow him to do research in Cuba for an upcoming book on the Political Theology of José Martí.
Morning Lecture: Wynton Marsalis, managing and artistic di..    Amphitheater
Wynton Marsalis Managing and artistic director, Jazz at Lincoln Center World-renowned trumpeter and composer 10:45 a.m. Monday, August 19 & Friday, August 23, 2019 Wynton Marsalis returns to Chautauqua to open and close a week on "Exploring Race and Culture in America with Wynton Marsalis and Jazz at Lincoln Center." Through a Monday morning lecture, performances with the Jazz at Lincoln Center Orchestra throughout the week — including the second-ever performance of The Ever Fonky Lowdown — and a Friday morning Amphitheater conversation, Marsalis will convey his hopes, concerns, and insights about contemporary culture and society through a historically informed lens. An internationally acclaimed musician, composer, bandleader, educator and a leading advocate of American culture, at 17, Marsalis became the youngest musician ever to be admitted to Tanglewood’s Berkshire Music Center. Since then, he attended Juilliard, performed 120 concerts a year for 15 consecutive years, produced more than 80 records and won nine Grammy Awards, two George Foster Peabody Awards and an Emmy Award. He is also the first jazz musician to win the Pulitzer Prize for Music. In 1987, Marsalis co-founded the jazz program at Lincoln Center. Today, Jazz at Lincoln Center presents rich and diverse programming that includes concerts, debates, film forums, dances, television and radio broadcasts and educational activities. Marsalis has been the recipient of countless honors around the world, including the Netherlands’ Edison Award, the Grand Prix Du Disque of France, and honorary membership to England’s Royal Academy of Music. The French Ministry of Culture appointed Marsalis to the rank of Knight in the Order of Arts and Literature. He also received France’s highest distinction, the insignia Chevalier of the Legion of Honor. In the United States, he has received a National Medal of the Arts, the Louis Armstrong Memorial Medal, the Frederick Douglass Medallion from the New York Urban League and an Arts Education Award from the American Arts Council. In 2001 was appointed as a United Nations Messenger of Peace. Marsalis has received nearly three dozen honorary degrees and awards from colleges and universities across the country, most recently the President’s Award at Hunter College in 2014.
Pat Benatar & Neil Giraldo and Melissa Etheridge    Amphitheater
Ticket Price: $59–$159* (GA @ $59, P1 PLUS @ $100, P1 @ $40, P2 @ $40) *VIP Photo Op Package with premium seating locations available @ $379 Presale: 3/28/19 (Fan Club and VIP Tickets Presale), 10:00 a.m. Public On-Sale Date: 3/29/19, 10:00 a.m. This concert is anticipated to sell out and standing room tickets may be sold Pat Benatar’s staggering vocals and take-no-prisoners attitude, along with Neil Giraldo’s trailblazing artistry as a guitarist, producer and songwriter, forged the undeniable chemistry and unique sound that created some of rock’s most memorable hits including “We Belong,” “Hit Me With Your Best Shot,” “Love Is A Battlefield,” “Promises In The Dark” and “We Live For Love.” Together Benatar and Giraldo have created two multi-platinum albums, five platinum albums and three gold albums, as well as 19 Top 40 hits. They have sold over 30 million records worldwide and have won four consecutive Grammy awards. Benatar and Giraldo have been married since 1982, and this summer they will celebrate the 40th anniversary of their musical career. Melissa Etheridge is one of rock music’s great female icons. Her critically acclaimed eponymous debut album was certified double-platinum. Etheridge’s popularity grew around such memorable songs as “Bring Me Some Water,” “No Souvenirs” and “Ain’t It Heavy” for which she won her first Grammy for Best Female Rock Vocal. Her fourth album, Yes I Am, brought her a second Grammy and featured one of her biggest hit songs, “I’m the Only One.” This six-time platinum album spent more than two and a half years on the charts. Etheridge’s latest release was 2016’s Memphis Rock and Soul, and she is ready to rock the Amphitheater and help Chautauqua celebrate summer on this season’s closing night of popular entertainment. https://www.benatargiraldo.com/ https://www.melissaetheridge.com/ https://youtu.be/WlKUArDGXoY https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=aDpJRI7CocU

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